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Posts Tagged ‘archaeology’

Pyramid Discoveries Will Force History To Be Re-Written

August 5, 2011 1 comment

bodymindspiritjourney

Pyramid discovered in BosniaThe world’s largest and oldest pyramid has been discovered in Bosnia

A pyramid has been discovered in Bosnia-Herzegovina that is larger, older and more perfectly oriented than Egypt’s Great Pyramid of Giza. Located near the city of Visoko, not only is it the first pyramid to be discovered in Europe, but it is also the largest valley of pyramids in the world.

Its discoverer, Dr. Semir Osmanagich, has also identified pyramids in Asia, Africa, North America and even islands such as Mauritius and Tahiti. He believes these man-made structures are so similar that they prove there was communication during ancient times over vast distances. “Our history books must be re-written,” he said.

The pyramid in Bosnia-Herzegovina has been dated at over 12,000 years old, and it also features the largest complex of Read more…

Ancient Tablet Found: Oldest Readable Writing in Europe

March 30, 2011 Comments off

nationalgeographic.com

The back of a tablet.

Names and numbers fill the back (pictured) of the tablet fragment, found last summer in Greece.

 

Marks on a clay tablet fragment found in Greece are the oldest known decipherable text in Europe, a new study says.

Considered “magical or mysterious” in its time, the writing survives only because a trash heap caught fire some 3,500 years ago, according to researchers.

Found in an olive grove in what’s now the village of Iklaina (map), the tablet was created by a Greek-speaking Mycenaean scribe between 1450 and 1350 B.C., archaeologists say.

The Mycenaeans—made legendary in part by Homer’s Iliad, which fictionalizes their war with Troy—dominated much of Greece from about 1600 B.C. to 1100 B.C. (See “Is Troy True? The Evidence Behind Movie Myth.”)

So far, excavations at Iklaina have yielded evidence of an early Mycenaean palace, giant terrace walls, murals, and a surprisingly advanced drainage system, according to dig director Michael Cosmopoulos.

But the tablet, found last summer, is the biggest surprise of the multiyear project, Cosmopoulos said.

“According to what we knew, that tablet should not have been there,” the University of Missouri-St. Louis archaeologist Read more…

Stonehenge Beneath the Waters of Lake Michigan

February 16, 2011 Comments off

Has a Stonehenge like structure been discovered underneath the waters of Lake Michigan. If so, the site could be around 10,000 years old!

[Image: Standing stones beneath Lake Michigan? View larger].

In a surprisingly under-reported story from 2007, Mark Holley, a professor of underwater archaeology at Northwestern Michigan University College, discovered a series of stones – some of them arranged in a circle and one of which seemed to show carvings of a mastodon – 40-feet beneath the surface waters of Lake Michigan.
If verified, the carvings could be as much as 10,000 years old – coincident with the post Read more…

Giant rats lead scientists to ancient face carvings

February 12, 2011 Comments off
Ancient stone faces carved into the walls of a well-known limestone cave in East Timor have been discovered by a team searching for fossils of extinct giant rats.

Group of petroglyphs in Lena Hara Cave, East Timor

Credit: John Brush

The team of archaeologists and palaeontologists were working in Lene Hara Cave on the northeast tip of East Timor.

“Looking up from the cave floor at a colleague sitting on a ledge, my head torch shone on what seemed to be a weathered carving,” CSIRO’s Dr Ken Aplin said.

“I shone the torch around and saw a whole panel of engraved prehistoric human faces on the wall of the cave. Read more…

Google Earth finds Saudi Arabia’s forbidden archaeological secrets

February 6, 2011 Comments off

An armchair archaeologist has identified nearly 2,000 potentially important sites in Saudi Arabia using Google Earth, despite never having visited the country.

By Praveen Swami

David Kennedy, a professor of classics and ancient history at the University of Western Australia, used Google Earth satellite maps to pinpoint 1,977 potential archaeological sites, including 1,082 teardrop shaped stone tombs.

“I’ve never been to Saudi Arabia,” Dr Kennedy said. “It’s not the easiest country to break into.”

Dr Kennedy told New Scientist that he had verified the images showed actual archaeological sites by asking a friend working in the Kingdom to photograph the locations.

The use of aerial and satellite imaging has been used in Britain to locate Iron Age and Roman sites in Britain, as well as Nazca lines in Peru and Mayan ruins in Belize.

But few archaeologists have been given access to Saudi Arabia, which has long been hostile to the discipline. Hardline clerics in the kingdom fear that it might focus attention on the civilisations which flourished there before the rise of Islam – and thus, in the long term, undermine the state religion.

In 1994, a council of Saudi clerics was reported to have issued an edict asserting that preserving historical sites “could lead to polytheism and idolatry” – both punishable, under the Kingdom’s laws, by death.

Saudi Arabia’s rulers have, in recent years, allowed archaeologists to excavate some sites, including the spectacular but little-known ruins of Maidan Saleh, a 2,000 old city which marked the southern limits of the powerful Nabataean civilisation.

For the most part, though, access to ancient sites has been severely restricted.

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