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Posts Tagged ‘bees’

Blamed for Bee Collapse, Monsanto Buys Leading Bee Research Firm

April 19, 2012 Comments off

naturalsociety.com

Monsanto, the massive biotechnology company being blamed for contributing to the dwindling bee population, has bought up one of the leading bee collapse research organizations. Recently banned from Poland with one of the primary reasons being that the company’s genetically modified corn may be devastating the dying bee population, it is evident that Monsanto is under serious fire for their role in the downfall of the vital insects. It is therefore quite apparent why Monsanto bought one of the largest bee research firms on the planet.

It can be found in public company reports hosted on mainstream media that Monsanto scooped up the Beeologics firm back in September 2011. During this time the correlation between Monsanto’s GM crops and the bee decline was not explored in the mainstream, and in fact it was hardly touched upon until Polish officials addressed the serious concern amid the monumental ban. Owning a major organization that focuses heavily on the bee collapse and is recognized by the USDA for their mission Read more…

Categories: Genetic Modified Tags: , ,

Study: EPA-approved GMO insecticide responsible for killing off bees, contaminating entire food chain

April 9, 2012 Comments off

naturalnews.com

(NaturalNews) Early last year, leaked documents obtained by a Colorado beekeeper exposed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency‘s (EPA) illegitimate approval of clothianidin, a highly-toxic pesticide manufactured by Bayer CropScience that the regulatory agency knew was capable of killing off bees (http://www.naturalnews.com/030921_EPA_pesticides.html). Now, a new study out of Purdue University in Indiana has not only confirmed, once again, that clothianidin is killing off bees, but also that clothianidin’s toxicity is systemic throughout the entire food chain, which could one day lead to the catastrophic destruction of the food supply.

The study, which was published in the online journal PLoS ONE, investigated the various methods and routes by which a class of insecticides known as neonicotinoids, which includes clothianidin, are harming honey bees. They discovered that both clothianidin and thiamethoxam, another component of neonicotinoid insecticides, persist in “extremely high levels” in planter exhaust material produced during the planting of crops treated with these insecticides, which runs contrary to industry claims that the chemicals biodegrade and are not a threat.

The research team also found neonicotinoid compounds in soil, including in fields where the chemicals were not even sprayed, as well as on various plants and flowers visited by bees. Based on their analysis, the researchers involved with the study determined that bees actively transfer contaminated pollen Read more…

Categories: Toxins Tags: , ,

Millions of Bees Mysteriously Die in Florida

October 3, 2011 Comments off

cbslocal

Honey Bees. Getty Images

Honey Bees. Getty Images

MICCO, Fla. (CBS Tampa/AP) – Florida officials are abuzz as to how millions of honey bees were killed in Brevard County.

Several beekeepers in the county have reported lost colonies this week. Charles Smith of Smith Family Honey Company told Stuart News Thursday he lost 400 beehives. He says the bees appeared to have been poisoned.

“I’ll never get completely compensated for this unless someone handed me 400 beehives,” Smith told Stuart News. “I lost the bees, the ability to make honey and the ability to sell the bees.”

 Smith told Florida Today that he lost $150,000 from the incident.

State officials are testing the bees to determine what type of chemicals contributed to their deaths.

Experts say pesticides might be behind the lost beehives.

“The fact that it was so widespread and so rapid, I think you can pretty much rule out disease,” Bill Kern, an entomologist with the University of Florida’s Research and Education Center, told Florida Today. “It happened essentially almost in one day. Usually diseases affect adults or the brood, you don’t have something that kills them both.”

The case in Micco, 18 miles south of Melbourne, is being investigated by state agriculture officials and the sheriff’s office.

Categories: Strange Events Tags: ,

Einstein was right – honey bee collapse threatens global food security

February 8, 2011 Comments off

The bee crisis has been treated as a niche concern until now, but as the UN’s index of food prices hits an all time-high, it is becoming urgent to know whether the plight of the honey bee risks further exhausting our food security.

Almost a third of global farm output depends on animal pollination, largely by honey bees.
These foods provide 35pc of our calories, most of our minerals, vitamins, and anti-oxidants, and the foundations of gastronomy. Yet the bees are dying – or being killed – at a disturbing pace.
The story of “colony collapse disorder” (CCD) is already well-known to readers of The Daily Telegraph.
Some keep hives at home and have experienced this mystery plague, and doubtless have strong views on whether it is caused by parasites, or a virus, or use of pesticides that play havoc with the nervous system of young bees, or a synergy of destructive forces coming together.
The bee crisis has been treated as a niche concern until now, but as the UN’s index of food prices hits an all time-high in real terms (not just nominal) and grain shortages trigger revolutions in the Middle East, it is becoming urgent to know whether the Read more…

Powdermill researchers to study ‘alarming’ decline of bees

January 24, 2011 Comments off

By Rick Wills

As four previously abundant bumblebee species near extinction in the United States, it is becoming clear how little is known about native bees — which experts say often are more efficient at pollinating some crops than honeybees.

The Powdermill Nature Reserve in Westmoreland County, part of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, plans to take a hard look at native bees.

“There are 20,000 species of bees in the world, and we know almost nothing about native pollinators,” said John Wenzel, director of the Center for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Management, the second of five Powdermill centers that opened recently. “We have only scratched the surface.”

A Penn State study released last month confirmed agriculturally important bumblebees are not just disappearing here but worldwide. Researchers called the findings “alarming.”

“The disappearance of these species happened very quickly, and no one really knows why,” Wenzell said.

The study found that native pollinators, like wild bees and wasps, are infected by the same viral diseases as honeybees and that these viruses are transmitted via pollen. Read more…

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