Archive

Posts Tagged ‘security’

U.S. Government & Military To Get Secret-Worthy Android Phones

February 4, 2012 Comments off

techcrunch.com

hardware

The amount of stuff we trust to fly in and out of our smartphones is astounding. Just look at what happened when a couple of reporters got access to an unwitting (and rather unlucky) Apple employee’s iMessages alone — within days, they learned more about him than most people know about their closest friends.

Now, imagine all the stuff that could fly in and out of a government official’s phone, or that of a highly-ranked member of the military. Forget saucy texts and booty pictures — we’re talking about state secrets, here.

Looking to keep their secrets underwraps while on the go, the U.S government is working on a build of Android custom-tailored to meet their security requirements.

Word of the project comes from CNN, who notes that U.S. officials/soldiers aren’t currently allowed to send any classified data over their smartphones. If they need to transmit anything that might Read more…

NFL wants pat downs from ankles up at all stadiums

September 15, 2011 Comments off

usatoday

The NFL is ordering all fans to be frisked from the ankles up before entering stadiums this season. The ‘enhanced’ security move will impact 16.6 million fans. Previously, security guards were instructed only to search fans from the waist up.
By Reinhold Matay, AP Photo

The NFL wants all fans patted down from the ankles up this season to improve fan safety.

Previously, security guards only patted down fans from the waist up before gaining entry to NFL stadiums. Under the new “enhanced” pat-down procedures, the NFL wants all 32 clubs to search fans from ankles to the knees as well as the waist up.

The stricter security approach impacts the 16.6 million fans expected to attend live regular season NFL games this season.

The league wanted all clubs to implement the enhanced searches for Week One of the new season, says spokesman Brian McCarthy. The NFL hopes fans Read more…

Hackers may target cars next, McAfee says

September 10, 2011 1 comment

cnet

(Credit: McAfee/Wind River)

Think of it as carjacking for the Digital Age.

The increasingly sophisticated systems running a car may lead to new vulnerabilities, according to a study (PDF) released today from security software provider McAfee in partnership with mobile software provider Wind River and embedded security provider Escrypt. Those systems could allow hackers to take control of the car, track its location, and even access devices that are connected to it, including smartphones and tablets carrying valuable personal data.

The potential threat comes as hackers have increasingly shown a willingness to attack companies, government officials and agencies, and even Hollywood. Hacker groups such as Anonymous have caused headaches as they have stolen and released private information.

Those same threats could arrive in your Read more…

Categories: hacking Tags: , , , , ,

Exclusive: Elaborate New York City Post-9/11 Security

September 10, 2011 Comments off

cbs

Surveillance Cameras (file / credit: Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

Surveillance Cameras (file / credit: Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

NEW YORK (CBS 2)— The latest terror threat has come out just as a brand new CBS/New York Times poll shows 1 out of 3 New Yorkers still thinks about the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks at least once a week.

CBS 2’s Marcia Kramer has an exclusive look at the city’s post-9/11 security.

There are radiation detection boats in the waters, cameras that have been placed all over lower and Midtown Manhattan and there are cops with guns and tanks and all kinds of weapons, because in New York a terror attack could come from anywhere, and anyone.

“There’s no shortage of people who are willing to give up their lives for the cause,” NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly said.

It’s been 10 years but our concerns about terrorism are still staggering and constant. Even the death of Osama bin Laden didn’t Read more…

TSA could begin searching for explosives hidden inside you

July 7, 2011 Comments off

homelandsecuritynewswire

Government intelligence officials are now warning airlines that terrorists could be using surgically implanted explosives to bypass security measures; there is no information regarding a specific plot or threat, but airlines could begin to implement additional screening procedures as the current body scanners cannot effectively detect bombs hidden inside an individual; last year, al Qaeda operatives in Iraq implanted two dogs with explosives, but the dogs died before they could loaded onto a U.S.-bound plane
Swabbing hands for explosive residue // Source: consumertraveler.com

Government intelligence officials are now warning airlines that terrorists could be using surgically implanted explosives to bypass security measures.

There is no information regarding a specific plot or threat, but airlines could begin to implement additional screening procedures as the current body scanners cannot effectively detect bombs hidden inside an individual.

According to the Los Angeles Times, U.S. officials have received new information that suggest terrorists may be seriously considering surgically implanting explosive devices to circumvent existing screening procedures.

In response, Nicholas Kimball, a spokesman for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), said Read more…

U.S.-Canada Perimeter Security and an Integrated North American Command

June 8, 2011 Comments off

infowars

While few details have emerged surrounding talks between the U.S. and Canada on a North American security perimeter, there is little doubt that deeper military integration between both countries will play an important part of any such deal. Plans for a common security perimeter have renewed calls to expand the NORAD bilateral air defence model to include ground and naval forces. There are also efforts to increase security cooperation in the Arctic and further integrate military command structures.

As part of the Tri Command Vision, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM), and Canada Command (Canada COM) are working closer together in the defense and security of North America. Moving forward, the Tri Command strategic goals are to, “Improve unity of effort with each other and with our respective mission partners; develop a culture of continuous collaboration and cooperation in planning, execution, training, information management, and innovation; enhance intelligence and information sharing and fusion.” In order to better achieve these objectives, “The Commands shall develop and share Read more…

New airport scanner which will take just five seconds

June 8, 2011 1 comment

telegraph

Passengers could clear airport security in as little as five seconds under plans for a sophisticated new screening system which would not require them to remove their personal belongings.

The 21 feet long smart tunnel combines all existing and imminent security technology in one place and would slash the time passengers wait at airports. Passengers would simply walk the length of the tunnel while they are scanned.

It would prevent the frustration many passengers feel when they have to partially undress at a security gate.

A version is expected to be trialled within 18 months and could be rolled out at major airports within five years. British authorities are known to be keen to use the next generation of airport security scanners as soon as possible.

Currently the aviation industry allows 30 seconds for passengers to pass through the existing security system.

But this time only allows for walking through the detector, removing shoes and belts, placing metal objects in a separate container and producing liquids for inspection.

It does not take into account the time passengers spend putting gathering their belongings afterwards, nor the time they have to queue before reaching the metal detector in the first place.

This can take around 10 minutes at the most efficient airports which now includes Read more…

Jails turning to full body scanners

March 19, 2011 Comments off

homelandsecuritynewswire

Cook County Jail in Chicago recently installed four full-body scanners to help improve security; officials say that the body scanners have enabled officers to better detect contraband items, hidden away in body cavities, and reduced the need for strip searches; the machines are located in the jail’s two maximum security areas as well as the initial processing area; officials say they plan to begin using body scanners at the Cook County courthouse to scan detainees before they enter the courtroom

Keeping weapons and contraband out of jails // Source: avvo.com

Body scanners are no longer just for airports. Cook County Jail in Chicago recently installed four full-body scanners to help improve security.

The machines were first installed last November in the jail’s two maximum security areas Read more…

Canadian defence scientists probe ‘biometrics of intent’

March 16, 2011 Comments off

ottawacitizen.com

OTTAWA — Canadian defence researchers are investigating how brain signals might distinguish hostile intent from everyday emotions such as anger and fear.

Though there is still much to learn, the goal is to push biometric science beyond identification techniques to a new frontier where covert security technology would secretly scan peoples’ minds to determine whether they harbour malicious intent.

“This ability can be used by members of the military and the security forces to isolate adversaries prior to commission of actions,” according to a research paper posted on the federal government’s Defence Research and Development Canada Read more…

U.S. might be giving away sensitive military technology, report finds

March 10, 2011 Comments off

 

nextgov.com

Sensitive military technology might be slipping into enemy hands, in part because of a dramatic decline in the number of foreign workers that the Commerce Department screens, federal auditors have found.

For national security purposes, the United States controls the export of so-called dual-use technologies — items that have both civilian and military uses, including computer security tools — to countries of concern, including Iran and North Korea.

One way to restrict the transfer of such technology is for Commerce to screen visa applications from foreign nationals who wish to work in U.S. high-tech companies.

But the Commerce Department, the agency responsible for checking visa applications to identify potential unlicensed exports, is not screening thousands of those forms, according to a Government Accountability Office report released on Monday.

Reduced visa application vetting is one of several factors that “may indicate the continuing risk that foreign nationals could gain unauthorized access to controlled technology,” the auditors wrote.

Commerce checked only 150 visa forms in fiscal 2009, a dramatic drop from Read more…

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 308 other followers