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Posts Tagged ‘Virginia’

Strong East Coast quake highly unusual: scientist

August 24, 2011 Comments off

reuters

Washington Monument tilting as a result of the 5.9 earthquake

(Reuters) – The strong earthquake that rattled the eastern United States on Tuesday was highly unusual in its severity, though it was centered in a part of Virginia known for smaller quakes, seismologists said.

The initial earthquake, which registered a magnitude of 5.9 just before 2 p.m. EDT, was felt from the Carolinas to New England.

“One of this size is highly unusual,” said Karen Fisher, a professor of seismology at Brown University and president-elect of the seismology section at the American Geophysical Union. “This is the largest earthquake by far that I am aware of occurring there in recent history.”

The quake’s epicenter in central Virginia is in an area the U.S. Geological Survey calls the Central Virginia Seismic Zone, Fisher said by phone from Providence, Rhode Island.

While the strength of the quake was unusual, the Read more…

Earthquake map shows epicenter in central Virginia (Video)

August 23, 2011 2 comments

nj.com

earthquake epicenter VirginiaView full sizeU.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey has posted this map of the 5.9-magnitude earthquake that hit central Virginia just before 2 p.m. today, sending tremors up and down the East Coast.

The yellow glow represents the area where potential damage is deemed “light” and perceived shaking is “moderate.”

The quake’s frequency hit the geology of the region just right, like a tuning fork, and reverberated outward, said Alexander Gates, the chairman of earth and environmental sciences at Rutgers-Newark, and an earthquake expert. But there’s no likely danger for aftershocks of the Virginia quake, which will be significantly more minor, he said.

“That was pretty good, huh? I was impressed,” Gates said. “You don’t get earthquakes like that so often on the East Coast.”

Though small earthquakes occur in New Jersey all the time, earthquake experts said today’s shaking was highly unusual.

“It’s probably the largest one people have felt in New Jersey in decades,” Read more…

Categories: Earthquake, Virginia Tags: ,

Rare brain amoeba claims three lives

August 20, 2011 Comments off

abc

Image Wikipedia

Three young Americans have died this year from a rare water-borne amoeba that swims up through the nose and infects the brain, the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) said.

Naegleria fowleri – an amoeba found in warm freshwater lakes and rivers and occasionally in poorly treated swimming pools – causes a “rare, but severe” brain infection and kills around three people a year, the CDC said.

In the first week the disease causes major headaches, fever, vomiting and a stiffening of the neck, eventually leading to confusion, seizures and Read more…

FBI seizes servers in brute force raid

June 22, 2011 1 comment

tgdaily

The FBI seized a number of web servers during a recent data center raid in Reston, Virginia – a facility used by the Swiss-based hosting company Digital One.

The operation knocked several web sites offline, including those run by New York publisher Curbed Network.

FBI seizes servers in brute force raid“This problem is caused by the FBI, not our company. In the night FBI [took] 3 enclosures with equipment plugged into them, possibly including your server — we cannot check it,” DigitalOne CEO Sergej Ostroumow confirmed in an official email to clients.

“After [the] FBI’s unprofessional ‘work’ we can not restart our own servers, that’s why our Web site is offline and support doesn’t work.”

Unsurprisingly, the raid has been tentatively linked to an ongoing investigation of Lulz Security.

Indeed, an unnamed government official told the New York Times the FBI was “actively investigating” LulzSec  along with suspected “affiliated” hackers.

While most Americans probably don’t really care about a few downed sites, the brute force raid executed by the Feds surely doesn’t bode well for the future.

One can’t help but wonder what comes next: mass Gmail seizures, Amazon cloud server confiscations, or perhaps entire data centers carted off in FBI trucks?

Clearly, U.S. law enforcement officials must learn how to minimize “collateral damage” to neutral civilian infrastructure during cyber-related raids. 

If they don’t, such operations could potentially be as disruptive as those executed by hostile digital infiltrators.

Rather ironic, don’t you think?