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Antarctica Mysteries

June 20, 2011 1 comment

marsanomalyresearch

By J. P. Skipper

For any who wish to track behind me, the above 1st image is included here to help locate the evidence site on the coastal area of Antarctica at the Southern Sea but inland from the coast. When zooming in on this site in Google Earth, one will encounter a narrow pale blue strip at this location within which the evidence reported on here resides. That pale blue strip is a corridor of high resolution surrounded by an extensive sea of smudge obfuscation and that narrow higher resolution strip is the sole reason why we Read more…

Beneath The Ice of East Antarctica: Dramatic Discoveries Mapped by Radar

June 2, 2011 2 comments

nanopatentsandinnovations.blogspot

Scientists from the U.S., U.K. and Australia have used ice-penetrating radar to create the first high- resolution topographic map of one of the last uncharted regions of Earth, the Aurora Subglacial Basin, an immense ice-buried lowland in East Antarctica larger than Texas.

This new topographic map of a portion of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet revealed several giant fjords carved by the advancing and reatreating ice sheet between 34 and 14 million years ago.

Topographic Map of Aurora Subglacial Basin with Fjords Labeled

Credit: University of Texas

The map reveals some of the largest fjords or ice cut channels on Earth, Read more…

Categories: Antarctica Tags: , ,

Walking on thin ice

June 1, 2011 1 comment

theage

Icebergs break away as the melting Antarctica landscape yields to glabal warming.Antarctica

Icebergs break away as the melting Antarctica landscape yields to glabal warming. Photo: Angela Wylie

Every now and then the magnificent, mute marble coast of Antarctica will suddenly find a voice and let out a shattering exclamation – like a gunshot. The noise travels far and wide, thundering uninterrupted across crystal space until sheer distance exhausts it.

It is the sound of an ice cliff collapsing into the ocean. Or maybe of a new iceberg cleaving itself away from the continent and setting sail. It is part of the natural soundtrack of planet history, though it is only rarely, and recently – in geological timescales – heard by humans.

In little remote scientific communities like the Australian Antarctic Division’s Casey Station, on the East Antarctic coast, a roar from the ice might briefly interrupt the labour or conversation of the scientists and tradesfolk who are resident there, working on some aspect of deciphering the climate story. For those lucky enough to be among them, to hear it, it sends a shiver of humility through your bones. You are, after all, at the mercy of this grumbling giant. The cryosphere Read more…

Mystery of cosmic ray source bombarding the southern pole of Earth intensifies

May 9, 2011 Comments off

theextinctionprotocol

May 6, 2011 – ANTARCTICA – Cosmic rays crashing into the Earth over the South Pole appear to be coming from particular locations, rather than being distributed uniformly across the sky. Similar cosmic ray “hotspots” have been seen in the northern skies too, yet we know of no source close enough to produce this pattern. “We don’t know where they are coming from,” says Stefan Westerhoff of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It’s a mystery because the hotspots must be produced within about 0.03 light years of Earth. Further out, galactic magnetic fields should deflect the particles so much that the hotspots would be smeared out across the sky. But no such sources are known to exist. One of the hotspots seen by IceCube points in the direction of the Vela supernova remnant, a possible source of cosmic rays, but it’s almost 1000 light years away. Cosmic rays coming from such large distances should be constantly buffeted and deflected by galactic magnetic fields on route, and should thus have lost all directionality by the time they reach Earth. In other words, such long-distance cosmic rays should appear to come from all parts of the sky. That’s not what has been observed. (Source article below) Read more…

Climate change blamed for decline in penguins: Population has halved in 30 years in western Antarctica

April 13, 2011 Comments off

dailymail

Climate change effects on food sources may have contributed to a halving of penguin populations in western Antarctica, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that populations of Adelie and chinstrap penguins in the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) and Scotia Sea had fallen by 50 per cent in the last 30 years.

The decline was directly related to a huge reduction in numbers of the penguins’ main prey, shrimp-like krill.

The populations of Adelie, pictured here, and Chinstrap penguins have fallen by 50 per cent in the last 30 years due to food shortages
The populations of Adelie, pictured here, and Chinstrap penguins have fallen by 50 per cent in the last 30 years due to food shortages

 

Krill density had dropped by as much as 80per cent, both because of heightened Read more…

New Mineral (Wassonite)Found in Antarctic Meteorite

April 8, 2011 Comments off

cosmostv.org

A meteorite discovered in Antarctica in 1969 has just divulged a modern secret: a new mineral, now called Wassonite.

The new mineral found in the 4.5-billion-year-old meteorite was tiny — less than one-hundredth as wide as a human hair. Still, that was enough to excite the researchers who announced the discovery Tuesday (April 5).
“Wassonite is a mineral formed from only two elements, sulfur and titanium, yet it possesses a unique crystal structure that has not been previously observed in nature,” NASA space scientist Keiko Nakamura-Messenger said in a statement.
The mineral’s name, approved by the International Mineralogical Association, honors John T. Wasson, a UCLA professor known for his achievements across a broad swath of meteorite and impact research.
Grains of Wassonite were analyzed from the meteorite that has been officially designated Yamato 691 enstatite chondrite. Chondrites are primitive meteorites that scientists think Read more…

Pace of polar ice melt ‘accelerating rapidly’: study

March 10, 2011 Comments off

 

(AFP)

WASHINGTON — The pace at which the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets are melting is “accelerating rapidly” and raising the global sea level, according to findings of a study financed by NASA and published Tuesday.

The findings suggest that the ice sheets — more so than ice loss from Earth’s mountain glaciers and ice caps — have become “the dominant contributor to global sea level rise, much sooner than model forecasts have predicted.”

This study, the longest to date examining changes to polar ice sheet mass, combined two decades of monthly satellite measurements with regional atmospheric climate model data to study changes in mass.

“That ice sheets will dominate future sea level rise is not surprising — they hold a lot more ice mass than mountain glaciers,” said lead author Eric Rignot, jointly of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of California, Irvine.

“What is surprising is this increased contribution by the ice sheets is already happening,” he said.

Under the current trends, he said, sea level is likely to be “significantly higher” than levels projected by Read more…

King Crabs Invade Antarctic Waters

February 12, 2011 Comments off

A warmer Antarctica makes a hospitable home for these crabs, endangering an entire ecosystem that has no defenses against them.

THE GIST

  • Shell-crushing king crab are expanding their kingdoms into the Antarctic peninsula.
  • Creatures living there for tens of millions of years have no defenses against these crustaceans.
  • Warmer waters are facilitating the crabs’ advancement.
crab A crab, Paralomis birsteini, lies on the seafloor some 1,200 meters (3,937 feet) below the surface.
Courtesy Richard B. Aronson, Florida Tech 

McMURDO STATION, Antarctica — Warming waters along the Antarctic peninsula have opened the door to shell-crushing king crabs that threaten a unique ecosystem on the seafloor, according to new research by a U.S.-Sweden team of marine researchers.

On a two-month voyage of the Swedish icebreaker Oden and U.S. research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer, marine biologists collected digital images of hundreds of crabs moving closer to the shallow coastal waters that have been protected from predators with pincers for more than 40 million years. They are the same kind of deep-water crabs with big red claws that you might find at the seafood counter.

“Along the western Antarctica peninsula we have found large populations over like 30 miles of transects. It was quite impressive,” said Sven Thatje, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Southampton in England and chief scientist on the cruise.

Finding crabs on the bottom of the ocean isn’t that big a deal. But here in Antarctica, Read more…

Antarctica Mysteries

February 7, 2011 Comments off

For any who wish to track behind me, the above 1st image is included here to help locate the evidence site on the coastal area of Antarctica at the Southern Sea but inland from the coast. When zooming in on this site in Google Earth, one will encounter a narrow pale blue strip at this location within which the evidence reported on here resides. That pale blue strip is a corridor of high resolution surrounded by an extensive sea of smudge obfuscation and that narrow higher resolution strip is the sole reason why we are able to view just a little truth here. Read more…

Lake Vostok drilling in Antarctic ‘running out of time’

January 29, 2011 Comments off
Lake Vostok
The first satellite images of Lake Vostok were obtained in the 1990s

With only about 50m left to drill, time is running out for the Russian scientists hoping to drill into Vostok – the world’s most enigmatic lake.

Vostok is a sub-glacial lake in Antarctica, hidden some 4,000m (13,000ft) beneath the ice sheet.

With the Antarctic summer almost over, temperatures will soon begin to plummet; they can go as low as -80C.

Scientists will leave the remote base on 6 February, when conditions are still mild enough for a plane to land.

The team has been drilling non-stop for weeks. Read more…