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Posts Tagged ‘Jupiter’

Astronomers see bright impact on gas giant Jupiter

September 11, 2012 Comments off

astronomynow

The impact captured on Video by George Hall in Dallas, Texas. Image: George Hall.

Amateur astronomers in the United States of America have reported a bright fireball in the Jupiter clouds tops as a result of an apparent impact. The first to see and report the event was amateur astronomer Dan Peterson from Racine, Wisconsin, who just happened to be observing the gas giant through his 300-mm LX200 ‘scope when the fireball burst into view; “This morning (9/10/2012) at 11:35:30 UT, I observed a bright white two second long explosion just inside Jupiter’s eastern limb, located at about Longitude 1 = 335, and Latitude = + 12 degrees north, inside the southern edge of the NEB. This flash appeared to be about 100 miles in diameter. I used my Meade 12 LX200 GPS telescope and a binoviewer working at 400X for the observation, seeing was very good at the time. We’ll have to Read more…

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New Mineral (Wassonite)Found in Antarctic Meteorite

April 8, 2011 Comments off

cosmostv.org

A meteorite discovered in Antarctica in 1969 has just divulged a modern secret: a new mineral, now called Wassonite.

The new mineral found in the 4.5-billion-year-old meteorite was tiny — less than one-hundredth as wide as a human hair. Still, that was enough to excite the researchers who announced the discovery Tuesday (April 5).
“Wassonite is a mineral formed from only two elements, sulfur and titanium, yet it possesses a unique crystal structure that has not been previously observed in nature,” NASA space scientist Keiko Nakamura-Messenger said in a statement.
The mineral’s name, approved by the International Mineralogical Association, honors John T. Wasson, a UCLA professor known for his achievements across a broad swath of meteorite and impact research.
Grains of Wassonite were analyzed from the meteorite that has been officially designated Yamato 691 enstatite chondrite. Chondrites are primitive meteorites that scientists think Read more…

EARTHQUAKE WARNING FROM RUSSIAN INSTITUTE of PHYSICS of the EARTH

March 13, 2011 4 comments

realnewsreporter.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A new report released today in the Kremlin prepared for Prime Minister Putin by the Institute of Physics of the Earth, in Moscow, is warning that the America’s are in danger of suffering a mega-quake of catastrophic proportions during the next fortnight (14 days) with a specific emphasis being placed on the United States, Mexico, Central America and South American west coast regions along with the New Madrid Fault Zone region.

This report further warns that catastrophic earthquakes in Asia and the sub-continent are, also, “more than likely to occur” with the 7.3 magnitude quake in Japan today being “one of at least 4 of this intensity” to occur during this same time period.

Raising the concerns of Read more…

Two planets found sharing one orbit

February 26, 2011 Comments off

newscientist.com

Buried in the flood of data from the Kepler telescope is a planetary system unlike any seen before. Two of its apparent planets share the same orbit around their star. If the discovery is confirmed, it would bolster a theory that Earth once shared its orbit with a Mars-sized body that later crashed into it, resulting in the moon’s formation.

The two planets are part of a four-planet system dubbed KOI-730. They circle their sun-like parent star every 9.8 days at exactly the same orbital distance, one permanently about 60 degrees ahead of the other. In the night sky of one planet, the other world must appear as a constant, blazing light, never fading or brightening.

Gravitational “sweet spots” make this possible. When one Read more…

NIBIRU,PLANET X Admitted by Scientists – NASA shuts down Space Telescope ‘WISE’!!

February 21, 2011 Comments off

You know how you sometimes can sense that something is present even though you can’t see it? Well, astronomers are getting that feeling about a giant, hidden object in space.

And when we say giant, we mean GIANT.

They’ve found the largest planet ‘IN OUR SOLAR SYSTEM’!. It orbits our Sun in a far elliptical orbit, and is said to be 4x’s the size of Jupiter! It has a helium and hydrogen atmosphere. It’s most likely to have moons! This planet fits the exact description of Planet X!

So, one must ask, why are they suddenly telling us now? Scientists have known about this planet since 1983 ( Read article below) and they’ve been using WISE and IRAS to monitor it. Does this mean it will be visible this year? I’m thinking so. They have no choice but to tell us as it will viewable to everyone w/o a telescope this year. And why are they not calling this planet by its real name? Nibiru? Planet X? Well, that would mean that all of Read more…

Giant Stealth Planet May Explain Rain of Comets from Solar System’s Edge

February 19, 2011 1 comment

Our sun may have a companion that disturbs comets from the edge of the solar system — a giant planet with up to four times the mass of Jupiter, researchers suggest.

A NASA space telescope launched last year may soon detect such a stealth companion to our sun, if it actually exists, in the distant icy realm of the comet-birthing Oort cloud, which surrounds our solar system with billions of icy objects.

The potential jumbo Jupiter would likely be a world so frigid it is difficult to spot, researchers said. It could be found up to 30,000 astronomical units from the sun. One AU is the distance between the Earth and the sun, about 93 million miles (150 million km).

Most systems with stars like our sun — so-called class G stars — possess companions. Only one-third are single-star systems like our solar system.

Not a nemesis

Scientists have already proposed that a hidden star, which they call “Nemesis,” might lurk a light-year or so away from our sun. They suggest that during its orbit, this red dwarf or brown dwarf star would regularly enter the Oort cloud, jostling the orbits of many comets there and causing some to fall toward Earth. That would provide an explanation for what seems to be a cycle of mass extinctions here.

Still, other astronomers recently found that if Nemesis did exist, its orbit could not be nearly as stable as claimed.

Now researchers point to evidence that our sun might have a different sort of companion.

To avoid confusion with the Nemesis model, astrophysicists John Matese and Daniel Whitmire at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette dub their conjectured object “Tyche” — the good sister of the goddess Nemesis in Greek mythology, and a name proposed by scientists working on NASA’s Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) space telescope.

It is the WISE observatory that, using its all-seeing infrared eye, stands the best chance of having spotted Tyche, if this companion to the sun exists at all, the researchers said. [WISE telescope’s amazing images]

Matese and Whitmire detailed their research Nov. 17 online edition of the journal Icarus.

Comet-flinging sun companion

The researchers noted that most comets that fly into the inner solar system seem to come from the outer region of the Oort cloud. Their calculations suggest the gravitational influence of a planet one to four times the mass of Jupiter in this area might be responsible.

Two centuries of observations have indicated an anomaly that suggests the existence of Tyche, Matese said. “The probability that it could be caused by a statistical fluke has remained very small,” he added.

The pull of Tyche might also explain why the dwarf planet Sedna has such an unusually elongated orbit, the researchers added.

If Tyche existed, it would probably be very cold, roughly minus 100 degrees F (-73 degrees C), they said, which could explain why it has escaped detection for so long — its coldness means that it would not radiate any heat scientists could easily spot, and its distance from any star means it would not reflect much light.

“Most planetary scientists would not be surprised if the largest undiscovered companion was Neptune-sized or smaller, but a Jupiter-mass object would be a surprise,” Matese told SPACE.com. “If the conjecture is indeed true, the important implications would relate to how it got there — touching on the early solar environment — and how it might have affected the subsequent distributions of comets and, to a lesser extent, the known planets.”

Is Tyche really out there?

The fact of Tyche’s existence is questionable, since the pattern seen in the outer Oort cloud is not seen in the inner Oort.

“Conventional wisdom says that the patterns should tend to correlate, and they don’t,” Matese said.

If the WISE team was lucky, it caught evidence for the Tyche solar companion twice before the space observatory’s original mission ended in October. That could be enough to corroborate the object’s existence within a few months as researchers analyze WISE’s data.

But if WISE detected signs of Tyche only once (or not at all), researchers would have to wait years for other telescopes to confirm or deny the potential solar companion’s existence, Matese said.



Astronomers spot ‘planet’ in Oort Cloud, but are they mistaking Tyche for her sister?

February 15, 2011 Comments off

 

© Ben McGee

If you grew up thinking there were nine planets and were shocked when Pluto was demoted five years ago, get ready for another surprise. There may be nine after all, and Jupiter may not be the largest.

The hunt is on for a gas giant up to four times the mass of Jupiter thought to be lurking in the outer Oort Cloud, the most remote region of the solar system. The orbit of Tyche, as it is provisionally called, would be 15,000 times farther from the Sun than the Earth’s, and 375 times farther than Pluto’s, which is why it hasn’t been seen so far.

But now scientists believe the proof of its existence has already been gathered by a NASA space telescope, Wise, and is just waiting to be analyzed.

The first tranche of data is to be released in April, and astrophysicists John Matese and Daniel Whitmire from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette think it will reveal Read more…