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Archive for the ‘Privacy’ Category

Homeland Security hacking into gaming consoles to obtain user data

April 10, 2012 1 comment

thehackernews.com

Homeland+Security+hacking+into+gaming+consoles+to+obtain+user+data
The U.S. government has hired a California-based company to hack into video game consoles, such as Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, to watch criminals, especially child predators, and learn how to collect evidence against them.
The U.S. government has awarded a $177,000 contract to Obscure Technologies to develop tools that can be used to extract data from video games systems.
The $177,000 contract with Obscure Technologies of San Rafael, Calif., is being executed by the U.S. Navy on behalf of the Department of Homeland Security because of the Navy’s expertise in the field, officials said.
Anyone who has ever played a few games of Call of Duty or Halo online knows that communities like Xbox Live aren’t exactly models of good behavior. But the federal government believes the occasional bursts of profanity may not be the worst of what’s going on according with consoles, and it wants a way to dig deeper.
In explaining their case, the government argues that both pedophiles and terrorists alike are using communication modes available only through video game systems to both lure Read more…

Your Cell Phone Makes You A Prisoner Of A Digital World Where Virtually Anyone Can Hack You And Track You

April 9, 2012 Comments off

endoftheamericandream.com

If you own a cell phone, you might as well kiss your privacy goodbye.  Cell phone companies know more about us than most of us would ever dare to imagine.  Your cell phone company is tracking everywhere that you go and it is making a record of everything that you do with your phone.  Much worse, there is a good chance that your cell phone company has been selling this information to anyone that is willing to pay the price – including local law enforcement.  In addition, it is an open secret that the federal government monitors and records all cell phone calls.  The “private conversation” that you are having with a friend today will be kept in federal government databanks for many years to come.  The truth is that by using a cell phone, you willingly make yourself a prisoner of a digital world where every move that you make and every conversation that you have is permanently recorded.  But it is not just cell phone companies and government agencies that you have to worry about.  As you will see at the end of this article, it is incredibly easy for any would-be stalker to hack you and track your every movement using your cell phone.  In fact, many spyware programs allow hackers to listen to you through your cell phone even when your cell phone is turned off.  Sadly, most cell phone users have absolutely no idea about any of this stuff.

The next time that you get a notice from your cell phone company about “changes” to the privacy policy, you might want to Read more…

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Everything Is Spying On You

March 28, 2012 Comments off

infowars.com

George Orwell was merely scratching the surface with telescreens – the 21st century home as a surveillance hub will outstrip anything you read about in 1984. From dishwashers to light bulbs, so-called “smart homes” will allow industry and the government to spy ubiquitously on every aspect of your existence.

CIA chief David Petraeus has hailed the “Internet of things” as a transformational boon for “clandestine tradecraft”. In other words, it will soon be easier than ever before to keep tabs on the population since everything Read more…

Exposed… Google Spying On Laptops Using Microphone!

March 23, 2012 Comments off

knowthelies.com

internet-spy

I like to bring in this article a confirmed surveillance attempt by Google of my laptop microphone around April of 2011. Note… Also before I am writing this my laptop was attacked by hackers again. Now I have to restore my laptop again right around when I am suppose to interview Dr. Michael Coffman via Webcam and Microphone. ~ Brian D Hill

It was even admitted on The Register in Sep 2006 that Google was developing eavesdropping software, that uses Audio ‘fingerprint’ for content-relevant ads, and that as I quote from their news website “to use the existing PC microphone to listen to whatever is heard in the background, be it music, your phone going off or the TV turned down.

The PC then identifies it, using fingerprinting, and then shows you relevant content, whether that’s adverts or Read more…

CIA Chief: We’ll Spy on You Through Your Dishwasher

March 16, 2012 Comments off

wired

CIA Director David Petraeus unwinds with some Wii Golf, 2008. Photo: Wikimedia

More and more personal and household devices are connecting to the internet, from your television to your car navigation systems to your light switches. CIA Director David Petraeus cannot wait to spy on you through them.

Earlier this month, Petraeus mused about the emergence of an “Internet of Things” — that is, wired devices — at a summit for In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm. “‘Transformational’ is an overused word, but I do believe it properly applies to these technologies,” Petraeus enthused, “particularly to their effect on clandestine tradecraft.”

All those new online devices are a treasure trove of data if you’re a “person of interest” to the spy community. Once upon a time, spies had to place a bug in your chandelier to hear your conversation. With the rise of the “smart home,” you’d be sending tagged, geolocated data that a spy agency can intercept in real time when you use the lighting app on your phone to adjust your living room’s ambiance.

“Items of interest will be

Read more…

Facebook Now Has 104,857,600 GB Of Your Personal Data Stored On Its Servers

March 16, 2012 Comments off

breakingnewsworld

Facebook users take for granted just how much of their personal data is surrendered when they sign up to the site and liberally share their lives on the popular social networking platform. But for the interested user, the numbers are here. According to the S-1 filing made by Facebook in anticipation of its IPO, a whopping 104,857,600 GB of data is stored on Facebook servers at any one time.

Facebook Now Has 104,857,600 GB Of Your Personal Data Stored On Its Servers facebook power users

That number was written in the SEC filing as 100 Petabytes of data, but most people of course don’t even know what a Petabyte is or how to gauge its size in relation to something else. Thanks to the fine folks over at TechCrunch though, a visual representation of the figure was created. The simplest way they found to put the number in perspective was to compare 100 Petabytes to the number of Toshiba 320 GB hard drives it would take to accommodate the overall number of bytes. Turns out in order to store 100 Petabytes of data; you would need 312,500 Toshiba hard drives.

Now some people may think Facebook is showing off, but when you really think about it, 845 million active users are bound to have lots of ‘stuff’ to share. And sharing and storage is one in the same where Facebook is concerned.

Should Facebook delete very old shared data from their servers? Let us know your thoughts below.

Mass Surveillance and No Privacy Bill is ‘For the Children’

February 21, 2012 Comments off

networkworld

By Ms. Smith

What happens when stupid non-geeks write bills like SOPA and HR 1981? Rep. Lamar Smith says it’s for the children, of course, and if you object to being spied upon online then you are some kind of guilty pro-child-porn lowlife pond scum sucker. Where does the stupidity stop?

It’s for the children, of course, and if you object to online spying then you are some kind of guilty lowlife pond scum sucker. No wonder so many of us hate stupid people. Rep. Lamar Smith, infamous to geeks as the author of SOPA, is sponsoring the bill H.R. 1981 which is better known as “Protecting Children From Internet Pornographers Act.” H.R. 1981 isn’t exactly as easy to spit out as SOPA and is closer to something out of Orwell’s 1984. The EFF summed it up like this, “This sweeping new ‘mandatory data retention’ proposal treats every Internet user like a potential criminal and represents a clear and present danger to the online free speech and privacy rights of millions of innocent Americans.”

More or less, much like the just-in-case your data trail eventually reveals you are a terrorist, this bill presumes you are guilty until proven innocent of being a child porn dog as it would require ISPs to store your data for

Read more…

Bill Would Allow Total Surveillance of all Canadians

February 14, 2012 1 comment

JASON MAGDER
THE MONTREAL GAZETTE
February 14, 2012

Police will get much easier access to the web-surfing habits and personal information of all Canadians if a new law – expected to be introduced in the House of Commons next week – passes.

Privacy watchdogs caution if the so-called Lawful Access law is passed, it would give police access to webbrowsing history and sensitive personal information, and would grant greater permission to track the cellular phones of suspects – much of it without the requirement of a warrant.

The bill, which is on the order paper for this week, would require Internet service providers and cellular phone companies to install equipment that would monitor users’ activities so that the information could be turned over to police when requested.

It would also grant greater permission to law enforcement authorities to activate tracking mechanisms within cellphones so they can follow the whereabouts of suspected criminals. If there is a suspicion of terrorist activity, the law would allow such tracking to go on for a year, rather than the current 60-day limit.

This isn’t the first time this law has been introduced. The most recent incarnation of the Lawful Access bill died on the order paper when the federal election was called last year.

Full article here

Democrats to continue Internet coup with new cyber bill

February 7, 2012 Comments off

dailycaller.com

A blackout landing page is displayed on a laptop computer screen inside the “Anti-Sopa War Room” at the offices of the Wikipedia Foundation in San Francisco, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, following a recent anti-piracy legislative debacle with SOPA and PIPA, will lead his second effort of 2012 to push Internet-regulating legislation, this time in the form of a new cybersecurity bill. The expected bill is the latest attempt by the Democrats to broadly expand the authority of executive branch agencies over the Internet.

Details about the bill remain shrouded in secrecy. Clues available to the public suggest that the bill might be stronger than President Barack Obama’s cybersecurity proposal, which was released in May 2011. Reid said that he would bring the bill — expected to come out of the Senate Homeland Security and Read more…

‘Deleted’ Facebook photos still viewable THREE YEARS later

February 7, 2012 Comments off

dailymail

Mark Zuckerberg, Founder and CEO of Facebook: Site users claim that 'deleted' photographs persist on the site for up to three years, accessible by anyone with a link to them

Deleted Facebook photos don’t disappear but can still be accessed by anyone with a link to the images themselves.

The company admits that its systems ‘do not always delete images in a reasonable period of time.’

The news is liable to be a shock to users who’ve relied on the delete function to remove embarrassing photos from office parties or nights out.

Deleted images vanish from ‘normal’ views of the site – ie if you log in to Facebook and look on somebody’s photo page, they won’t be visible – but remain visible to anyone with a direct URL link to the picture.

That means that if, for instance, a picture has been circulated by email, the image will still be there for anyone who clicks the link.

Facebook has repeatedly promised to ‘fix’ problems with the systems it uses to remove photographs, after users pointed out that images tended to persist after deletion.

Not all deleted pictures are affected, but a significant percentage.

Technology site Ars Technica reports that a picture of a naked toddler supposedly ‘removed’ in 2008 was still visible as of February 2012.

Site readers reported campaigns of harassment using Read more…