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Posts Tagged ‘social networking’

How secretly developed software became capable of tracking people’s movements online

February 12, 2013 Comments off

The U.S. government can track where you are, who you’re with, what you look like, and where you’ll likely be next thanks to a tool created by defense contractor Raytheon.

The tool, called Riot, or rapid information overlay technology, looks at your Twitter, Facebook, Gowalla, and Foursquare to determine Read more…

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Facebook new app update let them record sound & video from your phone, at any time, without your consent

January 19, 2013 2 comments

abovetopsecret.com

Posted by MrMaybeNot

For me this is where they stepped over the line. Facebook came out with an app update today on Android and when I looked at the new permissions this version request over the previous ones, I noticed that by updating, you consent to let Facebook use your microphone and record with your camera anytime, without your confirmation. I know I won’t be updating, but how many millions will?

Picture from my Android TV box: (same thing was asked on my phone)

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CIA Chief: We’ll Spy on You Through Your Dishwasher

March 16, 2012 Comments off

wired

CIA Director David Petraeus unwinds with some Wii Golf, 2008. Photo: Wikimedia

More and more personal and household devices are connecting to the internet, from your television to your car navigation systems to your light switches. CIA Director David Petraeus cannot wait to spy on you through them.

Earlier this month, Petraeus mused about the emergence of an “Internet of Things” — that is, wired devices — at a summit for In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm. “‘Transformational’ is an overused word, but I do believe it properly applies to these technologies,” Petraeus enthused, “particularly to their effect on clandestine tradecraft.”

All those new online devices are a treasure trove of data if you’re a “person of interest” to the spy community. Once upon a time, spies had to place a bug in your chandelier to hear your conversation. With the rise of the “smart home,” you’d be sending tagged, geolocated data that a spy agency can intercept in real time when you use the lighting app on your phone to adjust your living room’s ambiance.

“Items of interest will be

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Facebook Now Has 104,857,600 GB Of Your Personal Data Stored On Its Servers

March 16, 2012 Comments off

breakingnewsworld

Facebook users take for granted just how much of their personal data is surrendered when they sign up to the site and liberally share their lives on the popular social networking platform. But for the interested user, the numbers are here. According to the S-1 filing made by Facebook in anticipation of its IPO, a whopping 104,857,600 GB of data is stored on Facebook servers at any one time.

Facebook Now Has 104,857,600 GB Of Your Personal Data Stored On Its Servers facebook power users

That number was written in the SEC filing as 100 Petabytes of data, but most people of course don’t even know what a Petabyte is or how to gauge its size in relation to something else. Thanks to the fine folks over at TechCrunch though, a visual representation of the figure was created. The simplest way they found to put the number in perspective was to compare 100 Petabytes to the number of Toshiba 320 GB hard drives it would take to accommodate the overall number of bytes. Turns out in order to store 100 Petabytes of data; you would need 312,500 Toshiba hard drives.

Now some people may think Facebook is showing off, but when you really think about it, 845 million active users are bound to have lots of ‘stuff’ to share. And sharing and storage is one in the same where Facebook is concerned.

Should Facebook delete very old shared data from their servers? Let us know your thoughts below.

Official List Of Words Feds Monitor On Social Networking Sites

February 28, 2012 9 comments

alexanderhiggins

The Feds have been forced to release their social network monitoring manual, which contains the list of words the government watches on social media and news sites.

Earlier the Huffington Post reported on the Feds have been forced to give up their list of words they monitor on Facebook, Twitter, and comments being posted on news articles so I compiled that list below.

Homeland Security Manual Lists Government Key Words For Monitoring Social Media, News

Ever complain on Facebook that you were feeling “sick?” Told your friends to “watch” a certain TV show? Left a comment on a media website about government “pork?”

If you did any of those things, or tweeted about your recent vacation in “Mexico” or a shopping trip to “Target,” the Department of Read more…

India Bans Army From Using Social Networks

February 7, 2012 Comments off

breakingnewsworld.net

The contemporary soldier has to operate in a very sophisticated setting, using some of the latest technology, but many armies around the world are quite selective about which bits of technology they allow their soldiers to use.

India Bans Army From Using Social Networks indian armyOne case in point is the Indian Army which has taken the rather broad and somewhat harsh approach of banning entirely, the use of social media and social networks by its soldiers. The reason given for the wholesale ban is the typical “security safeguards” excuse, and many in the blogosphere are simply not convinced by it. Although there hasn’t been an official confirmation from the Army, sources close to the situation say that the ban is effectively immediately and will affect the 36,000 officers and 1.3 million regular soldiers that currently make up India’s armed forces.

The ban means that once you a soldier is enlisted in the Indian Army, he or she is not permitted to even have Read more…

‘Deleted’ Facebook photos still viewable THREE YEARS later

February 7, 2012 Comments off

dailymail

Mark Zuckerberg, Founder and CEO of Facebook: Site users claim that 'deleted' photographs persist on the site for up to three years, accessible by anyone with a link to them

Deleted Facebook photos don’t disappear but can still be accessed by anyone with a link to the images themselves.

The company admits that its systems ‘do not always delete images in a reasonable period of time.’

The news is liable to be a shock to users who’ve relied on the delete function to remove embarrassing photos from office parties or nights out.

Deleted images vanish from ‘normal’ views of the site – ie if you log in to Facebook and look on somebody’s photo page, they won’t be visible – but remain visible to anyone with a direct URL link to the picture.

That means that if, for instance, a picture has been circulated by email, the image will still be there for anyone who clicks the link.

Facebook has repeatedly promised to ‘fix’ problems with the systems it uses to remove photographs, after users pointed out that images tended to persist after deletion.

Not all deleted pictures are affected, but a significant percentage.

Technology site Ars Technica reports that a picture of a naked toddler supposedly ‘removed’ in 2008 was still visible as of February 2012.

Site readers reported campaigns of harassment using Read more…