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Posts Tagged ‘computers’

Edible Microchips, Biometric Identity Systems And Mind Reading Computers

January 19, 2012 4 comments

 

As technology continues to advance at an exponential rate, will we someday find ourselves living in a “scientific dictatorship” where virtually everything that we do, say and think is monitored and controlled by technology?  To many of you that may sound like a wild assertion, but just keep reading.  Our world is changing faster than ever before, and scientists have some absolutely wild things planned for our future.  As you read this, they are feverishly developing edible microchips, cutting edge biometric identity systems, and mind reading computers.  Many futurists envision a world where someday nearly all humans are embedded with microchips and have thousands of tiny nanobots living inside of them.  The idea is that we can “take control of our own evolution” and use technology to “improve” humanity.  But very few of those futurists address the potential downsides.  The truth is that all of this technology could one day be used by a totalitarian government to establish a dystopian nightmare where nobody has any liberties and freedoms whatsoever.

The world of tomorrow is not going to be anything like the world of today, and most people have no idea how dramatically the world is changing.

For instance, many people have never even heard of “edible microchips”.

Unfortunately, they are Read more…

China to Require Microblog Users to Register Using Real Names

January 18, 2012 Comments off

voanews.com

Photo: AP
A Chinese man uses a computer at an Internet cafe in Beijing, China, July 14, 2010 (file photo).

China’s top Internet regulator says Beijing will soon require all users of microblogs to register under their real names to post comments online.

Wang Chen, who heads China’s State Council Information Office, said Wednesday increased Internet monitoring is necessary in order to prevent the spread of harmful information.

“We must impose control and management measures on some phenomena on the Internet, such as inventing rumors, damaging social stability, delivering bad information such as pornography, and even conducting illegal commercial activity,” said Wang.

Last month, Beijing and several other major Chinese cities began a trial program requiring all new microblogs users to disclose their identities to the government. Wang said the program will be expanded to Read more…

New Cyber Attacks Will Target Power Grids And Major Public Works

September 15, 2011 Comments off

businessinsider

Russian turbine

Russian turbine before the accident

Image: wikipedia commons

Commander of the new U.S. Cyber Command General Keith Alexander said Tuesday that he’s most concerned about attacks targeting America’s electrical grid, and destroying large public machinery.

Gen. Alexander says cyber-attacks over the Internet are shifting from data theft to physical assaults.

To illustrate his point the General used two examples.

First, he pointed to the 2003 Northeast power outage started by a downed tree branch. Following the initial accident at the pole, the utility company’s Read more…

New data spill shows risk of online health records

August 22, 2011 Comments off

physorg.com

Until recently, medical files belonging to nearly 300,000 Californians sat unsecured on the Internet for the entire world to see.

There were insurance forms, Social Security numbers and doctors’ notes. Among the files were summaries that spelled out, in painstaking detail, a trucker’s crushed fingers, a maintenance worker’s broken ribs and one man’s bout with sexual dysfunction.

At a time of mounting computer hacking threats, the incident offers an alarming glimpse at privacy risks as the nation moves steadily into an era in which every American’s sensitive medical information will be digitized.

can lower costs, cut bureaucracy and ultimately save lives. The government is offering bonuses to early adopters and threatening penalties and cuts in Read more…

IBM develops first ‘brain chips’ capable of mimicking the process of human thought

August 20, 2011 Comments off

dailymail

The challenge in training a computer to behave like a human brain has tested the limits of science for decades.

But researchers from IBM today said they have made a key step towards combining the two worlds.

The U.S. technology firm has built two prototype chips that it says process data more like how humans digest information than the chips that currently power PCs and supercomputers.

Looking to the future: IBM has developed two prototype chips it claims comes closer than ever to replicating the human brain

The chips represent a significant milestone in a six-year-long project that has involved 100 researchers and some $41million (£25million) in funding from the U.S. government’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa). IBM has also committed an Read more…

Hackers target 72 organisations in ‘biggest cyber attack in history’

August 3, 2011 Comments off

telegraph

Security experts have discovered the biggest series of cyber attacks to date, involving the infiltration of the networks of 72 organisations including the United Nations, governments and companies around the world.

Security experts have discovered the biggest series of cyber attacks to date, involving the infiltration of the networks of 72 organisations including the United Nations, governments and companies around the world

A security expert who has been briefed on the hacking said the evidence points to China Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Security company McAfee, which uncovered the intrusions, said it believed there was one “state actor” behind the attacks but declined to name it, though one security expert who has been briefed on the hacking said the evidence points to China.

The long list of victims in the five-year campaign include the governments of the United States, Taiwan, India, South Korea, Vietnam and Canada; the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN); the International Olympic Committee (IOC); the World Anti-Doping Agency; and an array of companies, from defence contractors to high-tech enterprises.

In the case of the United Nations, the hackers broke into the computer system of the UN Secretariat in Geneva in 2008, hid there unnoticed for nearly two years, and quietly combed through reams of secret data, according to McAfee.

“Even we were surprised by the enormous diversity of the victim organizations and were taken aback by the audacity of the perpetrators,” McAfee’s vice president of threat research, Dmitri Alperovitch, wrote in a 14-page report.

“What is happening to all this data Read more…

Cybercrime Fight Costing Companies More This Year

August 3, 2011 Comments off

pcworld

Cybercrime cost corporations 56 percent more this year than last, according to an annual study from the Ponemon Institute and sponsored by ArcSight, an HP company.

Cybercrime Fight Costing Companies More This Year“Cybercrimes can do serious harm to an organization’s bottom line,” said the study, which found that the median cost related to cybercrime to the 50 companies in the survey was $5.9 million.

Larry Ponemon, founder and chairman of the Traverse, Mich., company that bears his name, told PCWorld there have been several root causes for the bump up in the cost of cyber crime. “Sophisticated stealthy types of cyber crime are happening more frequently,” he said.

When the study was done last year, he explained, more visible forms of cybercrime dominated the Read more…

Anonymous Fires Back at NATO with FBI Hack, Releases 400MB of Their Data

July 30, 2011 Comments off

gizmodo

Despite the recent spate of arrests on their side, Anon released 400MB of NATO data courtesy of big-time cybersecurity firm ManTech last night. This is their way of making good on a promise and reiterating that they “aren’t scared anymore”.

You’ll recall that NATO officially condemned Anonymous early last month. Well, as part of their long attack on ManTech, you’ll find a bevy of stolen NATO reports from the past several years, financial charts, and pictures of personnel both on duty and at rest. Pretty big, and this is only a portion of the gig of data they say they’re sitting on.

Anonymous effectively called ManTech’s $100 million contract with the FBI into very loud question. Indeed, ManTech also have contracts with the likes of the DOJ, NSA, and and NASA. All of whom are at risk now that Anon has gotten inside. They end their release with this:

Dear Government and Law Enforcement, we are repeating this message as we have the suspicion you still do not take us seriously: We are not scared anymore and your threats to arrest us are meaningless. We will continue to demonstrate how you fail at about every aspect of cybersecurity while burning hundreds of millions of dollars that you do not even have.

Pentagon reveals 24,000 files stolen in cyber-attack

July 15, 2011 Comments off

telegraph

The Pentagon has disclosed that it suffered one of its largest ever losses of sensitive data in March when 24,000 files were stolen in a cyber-attack by a foreign government.
The few copies of the book that managed to evade the Pentagon's dragnet are being sold for up to $2,000 (£1,260) on the internet

One of the Pentagon’s fears is that eventually a terrorist group will acquire the ability to steal data Photo: AP

William Lynn, the US deputy secretary of defence, said the data was taken from the computers of a corporate defence contractor.

He said the US government had a “pretty good idea” who was responsible but did not elaborate.

Many cyber-attacks in the past have been blamed on China or Russia, and one of the Pentagon’s fears is that eventually a terrorist group will acquire the ability to steal data.

Mr Lynn disclosed the March attack in a speech outlining a new cyber-strategy, which formally declares cyberspace a new warfare domain, much like air, land and sea.

It calls for developing more resilient computer networks so the Read more…

FBI seizes servers in brute force raid

June 22, 2011 1 comment

tgdaily

The FBI seized a number of web servers during a recent data center raid in Reston, Virginia – a facility used by the Swiss-based hosting company Digital One.

The operation knocked several web sites offline, including those run by New York publisher Curbed Network.

FBI seizes servers in brute force raid“This problem is caused by the FBI, not our company. In the night FBI [took] 3 enclosures with equipment plugged into them, possibly including your server — we cannot check it,” DigitalOne CEO Sergej Ostroumow confirmed in an official email to clients.

“After [the] FBI’s unprofessional ‘work’ we can not restart our own servers, that’s why our Web site is offline and support doesn’t work.”

Unsurprisingly, the raid has been tentatively linked to an ongoing investigation of Lulz Security.

Indeed, an unnamed government official told the New York Times the FBI was “actively investigating” LulzSec  along with suspected “affiliated” hackers.

While most Americans probably don’t really care about a few downed sites, the brute force raid executed by the Feds surely doesn’t bode well for the future.

One can’t help but wonder what comes next: mass Gmail seizures, Amazon cloud server confiscations, or perhaps entire data centers carted off in FBI trucks?

Clearly, U.S. law enforcement officials must learn how to minimize “collateral damage” to neutral civilian infrastructure during cyber-related raids. 

If they don’t, such operations could potentially be as disruptive as those executed by hostile digital infiltrators.

Rather ironic, don’t you think?