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Posts Tagged ‘IBM’

Biometric Credit Cards on the way…More personal Info to be stored

December 23, 2013 Comments off

theepochtimes.com

The ‘Black Friday’ attack was a sophisticated, pervasive form of credit card skimming. It was also widespread sweeping consumer details across Target’s 2,000 stores in North America. The point-of-sales breach, likely the result of an email phishing attack on Target’s back-end system, was a big blow the store’s holiday sales and goal to increase it’s online presence, which has stagnated at 2 percent of gross sales.

Collateral damage of the Target attack includes JP Morgan Chase, which had 2 million customers—10 percent—affected by the data breach. As an extra layer of security, Chase has limited customer debit cards to $100 per day, ATM withdrawals, and $300 for debit purchases. All of Target’s bad news and Chase’s consumer restrictions come in the last week of holiday shopping. Chase isn’t the only bank involved.

Public sentiment has been downright negative to “I will never shop at Target again.”

Let’s see what Chase customers think of $100 daily limits. Try going out on town for two on that money. So who can consumers trust with their credit cards and personal information?

It appears no one.

Target’s ripple affect will go beyond the three class action lawsuits, lost revenue, and  Full Article Here

 

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Big Google is watching you

January 16, 2013 Comments off

businessspectator.com

While travelling overseas at Christmas we naturally turned off mobile data on our phones to avoid being ripped off by the phone companies’ rapacious data roaming charges.

Instead, everywhere I went I asked for the Wi-Fi password and sometimes didn’t even need one. No problem, although using Google maps to get around in the street was impossible.

 

In fact with all three phone networks in Australia whacking up their data prices, I’m thinking of turning off mobile data at home as well. There’s more and more public Wi-Fi around and although the domestic Read more…

IBM Thinks Minds Will Control Machines Within 5 Years

January 24, 2012 Comments off

voanews.com

Download this story as a PDF

Japan's Honda Research Institute and precision-equipment manufacturer Shimadzu demonstrated a mind-boggling technology that lets humans control a robot through thought alone -- thus taking pesky button-pressing, voice commands and remote controls out of the equation. 2009

This is the VOA Special English Technology Report.

Controlling a device with your mind. Powering your home with the energy of your own activities. These are two of the developments that experts at IBM think will become reality within the next five years.

The technology company has released its latest “5 in 5” report. The experts think people will soon be able to control many electronic devices simply by using their minds. Scientists at IBM and other companies are researching ways to do this in a field of science known as bioinformatics.

They say people will soon have a way to just think about calling or e-mailing someone in order to make it happen. Bernie Meyerson is IBM’s vice president of innovation.

BERNIE MEYERSON: “[It’s a] simple ability to command a system to do something for you without actually doing or saying anything, literally thinking and having something happen as a result that’s accurate. Something with really deep capability so that a person, for instance, a quadriplegic, a paraplegic can actually utilize brainwaves to make things happen and basically run their own lives independently.”

Another prediction is a way for people to Read more…

Categories: Coming Events, Technology Tags: ,

Biometric Identification Will Replace Many Passwords In Next Five Years, Says IBM Scientist

January 5, 2012 1 comment

huffingtonpost

Passwords have been around since ancient history, but they may become obsolete sooner than you think. According to a recent prediction by IBM Speech CTO David Nahamoo, many of the problems with passwords will be solved by biometric systems that can identify individuals based on unique biological features.

It’s not just fingerprints, DNA and retinas anymore; the way you walk is unique and so is the way you type, for example. Orwell references may be inevitable, but the technology can be used for good as well, aiding in various interactive systems, from video games to cars to iPads, and otherwise making it easier to prove that you’re you.

For a long time, it was hard to use biometrics quickly and accurately in our daily lives, but the combination of various identifiers may make the systems convenient enough for widespread use. A recent column in InformationWeek points to the United States Visitor And Information Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) as a prime example of a system that’s been able to scale: “The enrollment and validation of these attributes is fast and accurate enough for use in everyday, large-scale deployments, and the Department of Homeland Security just announced it will pay Accenture Federal Services $71 million over 13 months to further improve the system.”

There’s also India’s massive biometric census project, which is Read more…

IBM develops first ‘brain chips’ capable of mimicking the process of human thought

August 20, 2011 Comments off

dailymail

The challenge in training a computer to behave like a human brain has tested the limits of science for decades.

But researchers from IBM today said they have made a key step towards combining the two worlds.

The U.S. technology firm has built two prototype chips that it says process data more like how humans digest information than the chips that currently power PCs and supercomputers.

Looking to the future: IBM has developed two prototype chips it claims comes closer than ever to replicating the human brain

The chips represent a significant milestone in a six-year-long project that has involved 100 researchers and some $41million (£25million) in funding from the U.S. government’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa). IBM has also committed an Read more…