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Posts Tagged ‘Guatemala’

Hike in worldwide food prices forces change in diet as more go hungry

June 15, 2011 Comments off

vancouversun

Costs rise 37 per cent in past year; more women, girls negatively impacted

Soaring food prices over the past year have prompted 17 per cent of Canadians to change their diets due to the higher cost of food. But Canadians haven't yet felt the full impact of raw food price increases, in part because of our strong dollar.

Soaring food prices over the past year have prompted 17 per cent of Canadians to change their diets due to the higher cost of food. But Canadians haven’t yet felt the full impact of raw food price increases, in part because of our strong dollar.

Photograph by: Noah Seelam, AFP, Getty Images, Postmedia News

Soaring food prices and health concerns are prompting people around the world to change what they eat, according to a new 17-nation survey done for Oxfam. And Canadians aren’t exempt from the trend.

Of the 16,421 people surveyed by GlobeScan, 53 per cent said say they’re no longer eating the same foods they did two years ago. Nearly four in 10 of those say some of the food they used to eat is now too expensive, while one-third changed their diets for health reasons.

“The rising cost of food is pushing more Read more…

Bilderbergers May Give Green Light to Mexican Central Banker as New IMF Boss

June 8, 2011 Comments off

infowars

Business Report today reports that Mexican central banker Agustín Carstens will be the next boss at the International Monetary Fund.

Earlier today, Prison Planet.com editor and lead journalist Paul Joseph Watson reported via video that the new IMF head would be decided this week at the Bilderberg confab.


The Latin America News Dispatch announced Carstens bid on May 25.

According to news reports, a dozen Latin American countries support the appointment of Carstens to head up the globalist loan sharking operation. The countries are Belize, Bolivia, Colombia, Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Venezuela.

The nations, a statement said, are convinced “of the need to promote greater participation of emerging economies in the region” in selecting the replacement of Dominique Strauss-Kahn as head of the world finance body.

Strauss-Kahn stepped down from the position after it was alleged he attempted to rape a hotel maid. Some believe Strauss-Kahn was set-up in order to remove him from the IMF.

French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde has also been mentioned as a possible replacement. Both Carstens and Lagarde have embarked on tours to promote their bids.

Agustín Carstens is a top-level insider. He is a Mexican economist who has held high-level positions at the Banco de México, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and Bank of International Settlements.

As an economist, he has advocated an orthodox neoliberal economic approach to the third world and so-called “emerging economies.”

Earthquake shakes wide area of southern Mexico

April 7, 2011 Comments off

google.com

Could there be a connection with the Solar Storm from yesterday?  Definitely.

MEXICO CITY (AP) — A magnitude-6.5 earthquake shook a wide area of southern and central Mexico on Thursday, sending people fleeing into the streets, but causing only minor reported damage.

The epicenter was located near Las Choapas, a town of about 83,000 residents about 370 miles (600 kilometers) southeast of Mexico City. It swayed buildings for several seconds in the capital, and in the Gulf coast state of Veracruz, people ran from their homes and school children assembled on playgrounds.

Near the epicenter, cracks in walls forced the evacuation of one elementary school, said Bernabe Hernandez Perez, head of civil protection in Las Choapas.

Gov. Javier Duarte de Ochoa said earlier that he had no reports of damage in the oil-producing state.

“Veracruz is completely quiet without problems,” he told state television. “It was felt all over the state, but nothing major happened. It was only a scare.”

The temblor also was felt strongly in the state of Chiapas, bordering Guatemala, where there also were no immediate reports of damage or injuries, as well as the Pacific coast state of Guerrero.

The U.S. Geological survey said the quake hit at a depth of 104 miles (167 kilometers).

E. Asia, S. America under tsunami warning after Japan quake

March 11, 2011 1 comment
By REUTERS
03/11/2011 10:45

Biggest earthquake to hit Japan in 140 years triggers 10-meter tsunami, kills at least 6 people; 4 million homes without power; hotel collapses in city of Sendai, people feared buried in rubble; UN rescue teams on standby.

SINGAPORE – A tsunami warning has been issued for areas across East Asia and the western coast of South America following a huge earthquake that hit Japan on Friday, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said.

Among the countries for which a tsunami warning is in effect are: Read more…

AP IMPACT: Past medical testing on humans revealed

February 28, 2011 Comments off

In this June 25, 1945 picture, army doctors expose patients to malaria-carrying mosquitoes in the malaria ward at Stateville Penitentiary in Crest Hill, Ill. Around the time of World War II, prisoners were enlisted to help the war effort by participating in studies that could help the troops. A series of malaria studies at Stateville Penitentiary in Illinois and two other penitentiaries were designed to test antimalarial drugs that could help soldiers fighting in the Pacific. Shocking as it may seem, government doctors once thought it was fine to experiment on disabled people and prison inmates.

By MIKE STOBBE,

ATLANTA – Shocking as it may seem, U.S. government doctors once thought it was fine to experiment on disabled people and prison inmates. Such experiments included giving hepatitis to mental patients in Connecticut, squirting a pandemic flu virus up the noses of prisoners in Maryland, and injecting cancer cells into chronically ill people at a New York hospital.

Much of this horrific history is 40 to 80 years old, but it is the backdrop for a meeting in Washington this week by a presidential bioethics commission. The meeting was triggered by the government’s apology last fall for federal doctors infecting prisoners and mental patients in Guatemala with syphilis 65 years ago.

U.S. officials also acknowledged there had been dozens of similar experiments in the United States — studies that often involved making healthy people sick.

An exhaustive review by The Associated Press of medical journal reports and decades-old press clippings found more than 40 such studies. At best, these were a search for lifesaving treatments; at worst, some amounted to curiosity-satisfying experiments that hurt people but provided no useful results.

Inevitably, they will be compared to the well-known Tuskegee syphilis study. In that episode, U.S. health officials tracked 600 black men in Alabama who already had syphilis but didn’t give them adequate treatment even after penicillin became available.

These studies were worse in at least one respect — they violated the Read more…