Archive

Posts Tagged ‘lunar eclipse’

The Coming Four Blood Moons

February 7, 2013 Comments off

Four ‘blood-red’ total lunar
eclipses will fall on Passover
and Sukkot in 2014 and 2015,
the same back-to-back occurrences
at the time of 1492, 1948 and 1967 Read more…

Volcano ash could turn Australia eclipse blood red

June 15, 2011 Comments off

ap

 Australian night owls will be treated to a lunar eclipse, and ash in the atmosphere from a Chilean volcano could turn it blood red.

The Sydney Observatory says the eclipse will begin at 3:25 a.m. Thursday (1:25 p.m. EDT, 5:25 p.m. GMT Wednesday) and last until after 5 a.m.

Scientists say the specific phenomenon happening Thursday — known as a “deep lunar eclipse” — often exudes a coppery color. But the intensity of the color depends on the amount of ash and dust in the atmosphere. Luckily for moon-gazers, there’s plenty of ash in the air. Air travelers haven’t been so lucky: The ash has grounded hundreds of flights around the region.

Scientists say the eclipse can be safely observed with the naked eye.

Researcher cites ancient Minoan-era ‘computer’

April 7, 2011 Comments off

www.ana.gr

(ANA-MPA) — The Minoan civilisation on pre-Classical Crete discovered the first rudimentary analog computer in mankind’s history, according to researcher Minas Tsikritsis, an academic who specialises in ancient Aegean writing systems.

Tsikritsis, who also hails from Crete where the Bronze Age Minoan civilization flourished from approximately 2700 BC to 1500 century BC maintains that the Minoan Age object discovered in 1898 in Paleokastro site, in the Sitia district of western Crete, preceded the heralded “Antikythera Mechanism by 1,400 years, and was the first analog and portable computer in history.

“While searching in the Archaeological Museum of Iraklion for Minoan Age findings with astronomical images on them we came across a stone-made matrix unearthed in the region of Paleokastro, Sitia. In the past, archaeologists had expressed the view that the carved symbols on its surface are related with the Sun and the Moon,” Tsikritsis said.

The Cretan researcher and university professor told ANA-MPA that after the relief image of a spoked disc on the right side of the matrix was analysed it was established that it served as a cast to build a mechanism that functioned as an analog computer to calculate solar and lunar eclipses. The mechanism was also used as sundial and as an instrument calculating the geographical latitude. (ANA-MPA)