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Posts Tagged ‘moon’

The Power of the Supermoon?

March 12, 2011 1 comment

accuweather.com

As I have mentioned here, on ABCnews.com (see the story by clicking here) and to people I had talked with about the supermoon, I was neutral, not a believer or non-believer in the power of the supermoon. Notice I say Read more…

Planet “X” Revealed by Cornell University

February 27, 2011 Comments off

Headlines from recent Cornell University web pages.:

Persistent Evidence of a Jovian Mass Solar Companion in the Oort Cloud

search.arxiv.org:8081/paper.jsp?r=1004.4584&qid=null&qs=nemesis&byDate=1

We present an updated dynamical and statistical analysis of outer Oort cloud cometary evidence suggesting the sun has a wide-binary Jovian mass companion. The results support a conjecture that there exists a companion of mass ~ 1-4 M_Jup orbiting in the innermost region of the outer Oort cloud. Our most restrictive prediction is that the orientation angles of the orbit normal in galactic coordinates are centered on the galactic longitude of the ascending node Omega = 319 degree and the galactic inclination i = 103 degree (or the opposite direction) with an uncertainty in the normal direction subtending ~ 2% of the sky. A Bayesian statistical analysis suggests that the probability of the companion hypothesis is comparable to or greater than the probability of the null hypothesis of a statistical fluke. Read more…

Two planets found sharing one orbit

February 26, 2011 Comments off

newscientist.com

Buried in the flood of data from the Kepler telescope is a planetary system unlike any seen before. Two of its apparent planets share the same orbit around their star. If the discovery is confirmed, it would bolster a theory that Earth once shared its orbit with a Mars-sized body that later crashed into it, resulting in the moon’s formation.

The two planets are part of a four-planet system dubbed KOI-730. They circle their sun-like parent star every 9.8 days at exactly the same orbital distance, one permanently about 60 degrees ahead of the other. In the night sky of one planet, the other world must appear as a constant, blazing light, never fading or brightening.

Gravitational “sweet spots” make this possible. When one Read more…