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Posts Tagged ‘Salton Sea’

Source of mystery odor still not found; some say Salton Sea to blame

September 11, 2012 Comments off

pasadenastarnews

Dead tilapia fish rot on the mud of the shore of the Salton Sea in March. Funding to stop the ecological collapse of the sea is not likely in the near futures with its $9 billion price tag. (Getty Images file photo)

A mail carrier in San Bernardino said it smelled like rotten eggs. A woman in Rancho Cucamonga blamed it on dairy cows in Chino. A man in Rialto said he couldn’t smell it at all. And about 60 miles west in Los Angeles, curious callers in the north end of the San Fernando Valley were calling the Fire Department seeking answers.

They were among thousands across the Southland on Monday to catch a whiff of what officials said was the result of biological decay, possibly from the Salton Sea, and an unusual wind that pushed it west.

Fontana resident Walter Martinez, 33, may have best described the foul odor wafting through the Inland area.

“It’s kind of funky,” he said. “If I go outside and take a breath, I cough. I feel an air irritation.”

Air quality officials from around the region fielded phone calls throughout the day from residents concerned about the smell.

Field inspectors with the South Coast Air Quality Management District in Diamond Bar spent the day investigating the possible causes of what they described as “widespread sulfur odors.”

“Fish kills, algae Read more…

California Mega-Quake Imminent Say Scientists

July 5, 2011 Comments off

Weather

The San Andreas fault is highlighted in red. It strikes through the heart of Southern California, including the Salton Sea.
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Like a steaming kettle with the top on, pressure is building beneath the surface of California that could unleash a monster earthquake at any time. That’s according to a new study from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography.

Geologists say Southern California is long overdue for a huge earthquake that could unleash widespread damage.

It all comes down to the Salton Sea, which lies to the east of San Diego. The Salton Sea lies directly on the San Andreas Fault and covers more than 350 square miles.

A big earthquake has hit the lake bed about every 180 years. But when officials started damming the Colorado River to reduce floods downstream (including in the Salton Sea), the moderate earthquakes stopped for the Salton.

Sounds like a good thing, right? Not necessarily. Seismologists think the Read more…