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Posts Tagged ‘tap water’

India objects to ‘smuggling’ superbug samples out to UK

April 8, 2011 Comments off

timesofindia

NEW DELHI: India on Thursday seriously objected to biological samples in the form of “swabs of seepage water and tap water” being carried out of the country “on the sly” by British scientists to test the presence of the multi-drug resistant superbug.

India said it was a signatory to World Health Organization’s International Materiel Transfer Agreement as per which permission is required to carry out any biological material from the country.

“The way scientists carried out samples from India to be tested in UK does not point to a good scientific motive. It is illegal,” said Dr V M Katoch, director general of Indian Council for Medical Research. “Some people want to keep the heat on India,” he added.

According to him, such multi-drug resistant bacteria — like what is being called a superbug caused by the NDM1 gene — exists in environment across the world. “To keep on pressing India as a hotbed of such superbugs is unfair, and its motive is questionable,” Dr Katoch added.

The scientists had collected 171 swabs of seepage water and 50 public tap water samples Read more…

Deadly Fluoride in Baby Food, Beer, Large Number of Food Products

January 28, 2011 Comments off

Infowars.com

I was looking for a picture for this story and ran into this story:Here is the link> Why is Fluoride Bad for You?

enlarge photo must read! > >

Fluoride isn’t just in your drinking water. It is in a variety of food and beverage products, including baby food and beer.

Here is an excerpt from a USDA database:

2004 USDA National Fluoride Database of
Selected Beverages and Foods

For Full Report on USDA Website
CLICK HERE

Intended goal of fluoridation: Delivery of 1 milligram of fluoride per day

1 milligram/liter = 1ppm (parts per million)

**mcg/100g = ppm * 100 (beverages corrected for specific gravity) Read more…
Categories: Toxins Tags: , , , ,

Unregulated Toxin Present in Tap Water of 31 U.S. Cities

January 6, 2011 Comments off

California is the first state to consider a limit on the “Erin Brockovich” chemical, which has been found in 31 of 35 U.S. cities recently surveyed.

The tap water in many U.S. metropolitan areas was found to have higher-than-recommended levels of chromium-6, a known carcinogenic compound that is not regulated by any state or national agency, according to a study released this week by a public health research and lobbying organization.

The Environmental Working Group (EWG), who performed the study, estimated that 74 million Americans in 42 states drink chromium-polluted tap water, much of which is likely the cancer-causing chromium-6 form.

Chromium-6 comes from industrial processes used to manufacture pigments, dyes and chrome plating, in addition to commonly being discharged from steel and pulp mills. It is also used to tan leather and prevent corrosion.

The compound, also known as hexavalent chromium, is best known from the 2000 biographical film Erin Brockovich, starring Julia Roberts.

Brockovich helped to wage a class-action lawsuit against Pacific Gas & Electric Company for contaminating groundwater in Hinkley, California. The company had hired consultants to produce sham research to obscure the link between the chromium-6 and elevated cancer rates, but, in the end, the residents of Hinkley—where chromium-6 concentrations reached as high as 580 parts per billion (ppb), with natural background levels of 1.19 to 3.09 ppb—were awarded a $333 million settlement in 1996.

Water pollution U.S. United States Erin Brockovich Chemical Chromium-6 Toxin Cancer Carcinogen 

Image courtesy EWG
EWG commissioned testing for chromium-6 in tap water from 35 U.S. cities. Red dots indicate EWG’s test sites and measured hexavalent chromium concentrations in parts per billion (ppb). Size of dot reflects the level found. Brown-shaded areas represent population-adjusted average concentrations of total chromium by county, calculated from EWG’s national tap water database.

More recently, EWG commissioned laboratory tests of tap water from 35 U.S. cities, where previous testing by local utilities had shown high levels of “total chromium,” a measure that includes chromium-3, an essential nutrient for human glucose metabolism.

The average chromium-6 level of all 35 cities was 0.18 ppb, with samples from the city of Norman, Oklahoma registering the highest at 12.9 ppb. One part per billion is the equivalent of one faucet drip of pollutant in 66,000 gallons. Tests detected chromium-6 in samples from 31 cities, and 25 cities showed the toxic metal at concentrations above a 0.06 ppb limit being considered by regulators in California — the only state to require chromium testing.

The compound was undetected in:

  • Indianapolis, Indiana
  • San Antonio, Texas
  • Plano, Texas
  • Reno, Nevada Read more…