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Posts Tagged ‘ancient’

2,500-year-old solar observatory in Peru reveals advanced culture

March 10, 2011 Comments off

freethoughtnation.com

The wonderful archaeological discovery of recent years at Chankillo, Peru, is described by physicist Dr. Brian Cox in the BBC video linked below. As he describes and waits for the sun rising over the top of the hill, to be seen through the niches in the 2,500-year-old monument, Cox has a big grin, like this is the greatest thing he’s ever seen.

We astrotheologians and archaeoastronomy afficionados agree! That’s why we work so hard to bring attention to the world’s great astrotheological traditions that go hand in hand with these fantastic monuments, proving that ancient man was far more advanced than is commonly perceived.

We also maintain that these astronomically aligned archaeological ruins found globally, along with the myths symbolizing the knowledge encased therein, represent very important artifacts that need to be preserved.

Prof Brian Cox visits Chankillo solar calendar in Peru

Professor Brian Cox has visited a giant desert solar calendar in Peru in his quest to understand the nature of time in creating and ending the universe.

The 2,500-year-old solar calendar in Chankillo was built by a civilization of which very little is known.

Regarding Chankillo, Wikipedia states: Read more…

Giant rats lead scientists to ancient face carvings

February 12, 2011 Comments off
Ancient stone faces carved into the walls of a well-known limestone cave in East Timor have been discovered by a team searching for fossils of extinct giant rats.

Group of petroglyphs in Lena Hara Cave, East Timor

Credit: John Brush

The team of archaeologists and palaeontologists were working in Lene Hara Cave on the northeast tip of East Timor.

“Looking up from the cave floor at a colleague sitting on a ledge, my head torch shone on what seemed to be a weathered carving,” CSIRO’s Dr Ken Aplin said.

“I shone the torch around and saw a whole panel of engraved prehistoric human faces on the wall of the cave. Read more…

Tower of Babel’s Ruins Waiting for Archaeologists

January 6, 2011 1 comment

Archaeologists are hoping to save the ruins of the Biblical era Tower of Babel, located in Iraq, and learn how it was built before it crumbled under the weight of confusion.

Following years of devastation under the dictatorship of Saddam Hussein and the ensuing American invasion of Iraq, World Monuments Fund conservationist Jeff Allen told The New York Times this week that archeologists are beginning to work on ancient Babylonian sites and possibly restore some of them.

No one has broached the idea of reproducing the Tower of Babel, which the Creator destroyed because of the generation’s attempt to compete with Him, “make a name for ourselves,” and build a tower to the skies while everyone in the world still spoke one language.

The Bible relates that their effort turned to confusion, with no one understanding anyone else, and that the tower became a self-destructive effort, both physically and morally..

“All this is unexcavated. There is great potential at this site. You could excavate the street plan of the entire city,” said Allen.

As a first step, experts are working on a plan to prevent further deterioration of the mud-brick ruins, which were damaged by Hussein’s personal building projects.

A mound of mud-brick buildings is all that remains of the ancient city in Babylon where the Tower was being built, whose foundations appear to be a square of earthen embankments, measuring 300 feet on each side.

King Nebuchadnezzar II, who reigned nearly 2,600 years ago, tried to rebuild the Tower of Babel to a height of almost 300 feet.

It is not clear whether the original building was actually a “tower,” an English translation of the Hebrew term, or was a “ziggurat,” a stepped pyramid that was common at the time. Building materials consisted of mud and brick because stone was not readily available.

Nebuchadnezzar described how “gold, silver and precious stones from the mountain and from the sea were liberally set into the foundations” and how to rebuild it he called on “various peoples of the Empire, from north and south, from mountains and the coasts.”

The rebuilt tower also began to crumble, but a Greek historian, visiting the site 2,570 years ago, wrote, “It has a solid central tower, one furlong square, with a second erected on top of it and then a third, and so on up to eight. All eight towers can be climbed by a spiral way running around the outside, and about halfway up there are seats for those who make the journey to rest on.”