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Posts Tagged ‘Arizona’

Data on Fireball That Exploded Over Arizona/ISON

December 12, 2013 Comments off

Jer 23:24 Can any hide himself in secret places that I shall not see him? saith the LORD. Do not I fill heaven and earth? saith the LORD.
Nasa/ISS and the ISONIDS http://amsmeteors.org/fireball_event/…
Solar and Quake Links http://www.BpearthWatch.Com

 

Categories: astronomy Tags: , ,

UM study links climate change, decline in songbird populations

January 25, 2012 1 comment

billingsgazette.com

University of Montana biology professor John Maron, left, and Thomas Martin, UM biology professor and U.S. Geological Survey scientist, explain the reduction of songbird populations in Arizona due to changing climate conditions.

JOHN CREPEAU/Missoulian University of MISSOULA — A decline in snow at high elevations has led to shrinking songbird populations in the mountains of northern Arizona, a new study by two University of Montana scientists found.

Some of the same bird species inhabit Montana.

U.S. Geological Survey senior scientist and UM professor Thomas Martin, along with UM biology professor John Maron, recently published the findings of their six-year study on indirect effects of climate change on ecosystems.

The abundance of deciduous trees and songbird populations have declined over the past 22 years because of decreasing snowpack above 8,000 feet in northern Arizona. Because of less snow, elk remain at higher elevations for longer periods of time, browsing on plants that provide cover and nesting places for birds.

The study is available now online, Martin said, while a hard copy of the journal Nature Climate Change is due out next month.

“The indirect effects of climate on plant communities may be Read more…

Fireball sparks panic as it shoots across 250 miles of night sky above California

September 16, 2011 Comments off

sott

When a streak of fire blazed through the air above southern California, people could have been forgiven for thinking the Earth was under attack.Thousands saw it from Phoenix in Arizona to Las Vegas and Los Angeles and local authorities were swamped with reports of ball of flame in the night sky.One witness said: ‘It was huge. It had a Read more…

Massive wall of dust swallows the Phoenix area, again

August 20, 2011 Comments off

freep

A layer of dust hovers over Gilbert, Ariz., on Thursday, in the Phoenix area's third major dust storm in weeks.

 A layer of dust hovers over Gilbert, Ariz., on Thursday, in the Phoenix area’s third major dust storm in weeks. / MATT YORK/Associated Press

PHOENIX — Metropolitan Phoenix was shaking itself off Friday after a giant wall of dust smacked the city for the third time in the last six weeks, turning the skies brown and coating anything left outside.

A 1,000-foot-high wall of dust traveled at least 50 miles into metro Phoenix and neighboring Pinal County on Thursday evening before dissipating. It reduced visibility, created dangerous driving conditions and caused some flight delays.

National Weather Service meteorologist Ken Waters said the size and power of three of the storms set this season apart. Thunderstorms moving through southern Arizona brought winds of up to Read more…

Categories: Arizona Tags: , ,

Heat wave chokes southern U.S.

August 5, 2011 Comments off

thestar

The suffocating heat wave sweeping the southern U.S. that has led to at least four deaths and left farmers’ fields bone dry shows no signs of abating as temperatures continue to reach record highs and electricity demand threatens to cripple the power grid.

The National Weather Service issued yet more excessive heat warnings Thursday for most of the southern plains, where the temperature in parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas reached as high as 43C, without the humidex.

Southern parts of California and Arizona in the west and Georgia, Florida and the Carolinas in the east also fell under heat advisories, while municipalities and counties scrambled to open cooling centres and make house calls on vulnerable residents.

Dallas marked its 34th straight day of temperatures over 38C, while on Wednesday, Fort Smith, Ark., saw the temperature reach 46C without the humidex, breaking a record of 42C set back in 1896.

As if things couldn’t get any worse, Florida residents are bracing for the Read more…

Unemployment rose in 90 percent of U.S. cities in June

August 4, 2011 Comments off

Unemployment rates rose in more than 90 percent of U.S. cities in June, according to a report released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Labor.

Unemployment rose in 345 large metro areas during the month, according to the report. Rates dropped in 20 cities, and remained steady in seven.

The national unemployment rate increased in June to 9.2 percent.

The statistics show a drastic change in unemployment rates in recent months. In May, unemployment rates rose in only 210 cities. In April, rates decreased in nearly all metro areas.

In June, employers added just 18,000 jobs, the lowest number in nine months. It was also a sharp decrease from the average of 215,000 jobs that were added in February, March, and April.

Many of the highest unemployment rates were seen in metro areas that are college towns. Champaign-Urbana, Ill., the home of the University of Illinois, saw its unemployment rate rise from 6.9 percent in May to 9.6 percent in June. College towns in Read more…

Supersize Dust Storms Could Become Southwest Norm

July 13, 2011 1 comment

wired

The massive dust storm that engulfed Phoenix last week was unusual for the 20th century, but could become more common in the 21st.

The storm resulted from thunderstorm-cooled air plummeting into the ground like mist pouring from an open freezer, only exponentially more powerful. Combine those winds with extremely dry conditions, and the result was a wall of dust 100 miles wide and 5,000 feet high.

Dust storms are common in the U.S. southwest, but not storms this big. No formal records are kept, but meteorologists said it was the largest such storm in at least 30 years. It was on par with storms seen in China’s Gobi desert and Australia. Some commentators invoked the apocalyptic storms of the 1930’s Dust Bowl.

 

As dry as it’s been in the southwest this year, with precipitation 50 percent below mid-20th century levels, there’s reason to think that extra-dry conditions will Read more…