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Posts Tagged ‘Coriolis effect’

Multiple vortex forming over Northern America

May 11, 2011 4 comments

thewatchers

There is an upper level low pressure system vortex storm forming of East Coast of US. It’s an occluded front with a low pressure of 29.29hg or 992mb. The winds are rotating the system counterclockwise. In previous post we gave some possible explanation of the situation and we gave some notes about polar cyclones, arctic storms, nor’eastern storms and explanation of Coriolis effect. The upper level low pressure systems are important to forecasting and can...

There is an upper level low pressure system vortex storm forming of East Coast of US. It’s an occluded front with a low pressure of 29.29hg or 992mb. The winds are rotating the system counterclockwise. In previous post we gave some possible explanation of the situation and we gave some notes about polar cyclones, arctic storms, nor’eastern storms and explanation of Coriolis effect.

The upper level low pressure systems are important to forecasting and can dramatically alter one’s forecast. Upper level lows can occur in association with a mid-latitude cyclone or may begin without the aid of a mid-latitude cyclone. Upper level lows without the aid of a surface low can develop when air flows over a mountain range, in association with an upper level short wave, or in Read more…

Warm Water Causing Cold Winters

May 9, 2011 Comments off

accuweather

This map shows sea‑surface temperatures averaged over eight days in September 2001, as measured by NASA’s Terra satellite. Dark red represents warm water (32 degrees Celsius) and purple is cold (‑2 degrees Celsius). The Gulf Stream can be seen as the orange strip extending from the eastern U.S. toward the Atlantic.

Imagine this: you are standing outside in New York City while waiting for a cab. It is in the winter and you are likely freezing. What if you were doing the same thing, but in Porto, Portugal?

Porto shares the same latitude at the Big Apple, but in Portugal you would be about 10 degrees warmer.

This happens for the northeastern coast of the U.S. and eastern coast of Canada. This is also true in other parts of the world. When the northeastern coast of Asia is colder, the Pacific Northwest is warmer.

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have found an explanation. The culprit is warmer water off the eastern coasts of Read more…