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Posts Tagged ‘Facebook’

‘Deleted’ Facebook photos still viewable THREE YEARS later

February 7, 2012 Comments off

dailymail

Mark Zuckerberg, Founder and CEO of Facebook: Site users claim that 'deleted' photographs persist on the site for up to three years, accessible by anyone with a link to them

Deleted Facebook photos don’t disappear but can still be accessed by anyone with a link to the images themselves.

The company admits that its systems ‘do not always delete images in a reasonable period of time.’

The news is liable to be a shock to users who’ve relied on the delete function to remove embarrassing photos from office parties or nights out.

Deleted images vanish from ‘normal’ views of the site – ie if you log in to Facebook and look on somebody’s photo page, they won’t be visible – but remain visible to anyone with a direct URL link to the picture.

That means that if, for instance, a picture has been circulated by email, the image will still be there for anyone who clicks the link.

Facebook has repeatedly promised to ‘fix’ problems with the systems it uses to remove photographs, after users pointed out that images tended to persist after deletion.

Not all deleted pictures are affected, but a significant percentage.

Technology site Ars Technica reports that a picture of a naked toddler supposedly ‘removed’ in 2008 was still visible as of February 2012.

Site readers reported campaigns of harassment using Read more…

High-tech devices leave users vulnerable to spies

January 6, 2012 2 comments

physorg.com

Spy technology is now available to the who wants to glean cellphone information, read private emails and track someone’s location using global positioning systems. And increasingly, experts say, the technologies are being used by spouses and partners to track, harass and stalk.

“Technology has just exploded. It’s so sophisticated now, and it’s very easy to utilize these different technologies to keep tabs on a person and find out where they’re going,” said Gina Pfund, chief assistant prosecutor of the Domestic Violence Unit in Passaic County, N.J.

The person watching or listening is often a family member and frequently a suspicious or controlling partner. They have scanned Facebook pages, viewed online Web-browsing histories, and examined cellphone records for proof. But some take it a step further, planting Read more…

Congress Could Make Facebooking at Work a Felony

September 15, 2011 Comments off

theatlanticwire

Congress Could Make Facebooking at Work a Felony

“Imagine that President Obama could order the arrest of anyone who broke a promise on the Internet.” That’s what The Wall Street Journal‘s Orin Kerr thinks the latest cyber-security legislation will lead to: An assault on checking Facebook at work. Today the Senate Judiciary Committee will vote on proposed changes to the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, which would seek tougher sentences for digital offenses. As more of the world moves online, so has crime. And legislation needs to adapt. But, does the latest updates to the bill target the right cyber criminals?

No, regular folk are in danger. The way the law is worded, it Read more…

5 Unexpected Places You Can Be Tracked With Facial Recognition Technology

September 1, 2011 2 comments

alternet.org

Facial recognition technology has become more advanced, and it’s increasingly popping up in two realms: law enforcement and commerce.
 Earlier this summer Facebook rolled out facial recognition software that identifies users even when they appear in untagged photos. Like every other time the social networking site has introduced a creepy, invasive new feature, they made it the default setting without telling anyone.

Once people realized that Facebook was basically harvesting biometric data, the usual uproar over the site’s relentless corrosion of privacy ensued. Germany even threatened to sue Facebook for violating German and EU data protection laws and a few other countries are investigating. But facial recognition technology is hardly confined to Facebook — and unlike the social networking site, there’s no “opt-out” of leaving your house.

Post-9/11, many airports and Read more…

Police Use of iPhone Iris Scanners Raise Privacy Concerns

July 21, 2011 Comments off

siliconangle

The so-called “biometric” technology, which seems to take a page from TV shows like “MI-5″ or “CSI,” could improve speed and accuracy in some routine police work in the field.  Dozens of police departments nationwide are gearing up to use a tech company’s already controversial iris- and facial-scanning device that slides over an iPhone and helps identify a person or track criminal suspects.

But its use has set off alarms with some people who are more concerned about possible civil liberties and privacy issues.  Constitutional rights advocates are concerned, in part because the device can accurately scan an individual’s face from up to four feet away, potentially without a person’s being aware of it.

“This is (the technology) stepping out of the cruiser and riding on the officer’s belt, along with his flashlight, his handcuffs, his sidearm or the other myriad tools,” said John Birtwell, spokesman for the Plymouth County Sheriff’s Department in southeastern Massachusetts, one of the first departments to use the devices.

“What we don’t want is for them to become a general surveillance tool, where the Read more…

Apparently, China is Trying to Buy Facebook

July 5, 2011 1 comment

penn-olson

Maybe it’s decided that Facebook is the lesser of two evils when it comes to Western social networks. Maybe it’s just Beijing buying itself a birthday present. Whatever the reason, it appears that China — or more specifically, one of China’s sovereign wealth funds — is trying to buy a significant stake in Facebook.

A Business Insider report cites “a source at a fund that buys stock from former Facebook employees” who was approached directly about helping to put together a stake big enough “to matter” and “a second source tells us there is a rumor going around the social network that Citibank is at this very moment trying to acquire as much as $1.2 billion worth of Facebook stock on behalf of two sovereign wealth funds – China’s and another from the Middle East.”

$1.2 billion isn’t going to be nearly enough of a stake to matter at a company whose value is pegged around $100 billion, but the news has caused some concern, given that Read more…

China Blocks Web Searches in an Attempt to Halt Protests

June 16, 2011 Comments off

dailytech

China has blocked internet searches after riots and unrest struck its southern province of Guangdong, home to many impoverished migrant workers.  (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Despite rampant censorship, the hacker collective Anonymous is yet to target the Chinese government as it did governments in the Middle East.

Anonymous remains silent on Chinese censorship

In China the long dreaded “Jasmine Revolution” might be starting to finally materialize.  Outraged and impoverished, migrant workers in Zengcheng, a city in the country’s sea-facing southern Guangdong province, have taken to the streets in protest, clashing with police.  The protests and riots began last week when police told two migrant workers to stop selling goods in the street, and then proceeded to knock down one of the migrants who was pregnant.  Video of the incident went viral and Read more…

Next generation Internet addresses tested on global scale

June 9, 2011 Comments off

rawstory

WASHINGTON (AFP) – A worldwide test was under way on Wednesday of the next generation of Internet addresses designed to replace the dwindling pool of 4.3 billion unique identifiers in the original system.

Hundreds of companies, organizations and institutions around the world are taking part in “World IPv6 Day,” including Internet giants such as Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Yahoo!

Internet Protocol version 6 is the new system of unique identifying numbers for websites, computers and other Internet-connected gadgets and is replacing the original addressing system, IPv4, which is nearing exhaustion.

IPv6 provides more than four billion Read more…

Analysts raise alarm on Facebook expansion of facial recognition technology

June 9, 2011 Comments off

smartcompany

The expansion of Facebook’s facial recognition technology into Australia has raised privacy and security concerns, with local analysts warning information accumulated by the social networking giant could be used for malicious purposes.

In a statement on its blog on Tuesday, Facebook announced it had launched the feature beyond North America into most countries. The feature uses facial recognition technology to speed up the process of tagging friends in photos.

The technology scans new uploaded photos and determines if the faces in these new images resemble those in previously tagged photos. If they do, the feature will suggest friends to tag. Previously, users had to tag photos manually, without suggestions.

According to the social network’s blog, more than 100 million photos per day are uploaded to Facebook and the goal of the feature is to Read more…

French government bans journalists from saying “Facebook” and “Twitter” on-air

June 7, 2011 Comments off

allheadlinenews

In France, radio and television news anchors are now prohibited from saying the words “Facebook” and “Twitter” on air, unless the terms are specifically part of a news story. The new stipulation comes from a 1992 governmental measure which forbids the promotion of commercial enterprises on news programs.

clearpxl

French news organizations now cannot suggest their audience “follow them on Twitter” or to go to their “Facebook page.”

Instead, they will have to say “find us on social networking websites” or tell viewers to “check out our webpage at this URL to find links to our pages on social networks.”

The French TV regulatory agency Superior Audiovisual Council, or CSA says the French government is simply upholding its laws.

“Why give preference to Facebook, which is Read more…