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Posts Tagged ‘iris scan’

Will iris scans be the way our children see their future?

August 6, 2013 Comments off

ocala.com

iris scanner NJ school 2003 apgraphicsbankSix-year-old Susie is excited about her first day of school. She lets go of her mom’s hand, looks back and waves at her as she climbs the steps of the big yellow school bus. When she reaches the top step, she presses her face against a machine that looks like binoculars — an iris scanner — which confirms that she has boarded the bus, and then she takes a seat next to her best friend.

Fast-forward 12 years, and little Susie is all grown up and ready to buy her first car — but there is a problem. The car salesman explains to Susie that there is an issue with her credit, and they won’t be able to finance the car she worked for throughout high school. As it turns out, Susie’s identity was stolen by a hacker years before she was even old enough to know what credit was. Using her biometric information collected by her school, the hacker obtained loans and credit cards all during her school years.

Is this a far-fetched scenario? Not really.

Biometric information is any physical or behavioral information that is Read more…

Computer Can Pick You Out From Your Eyes In A Crowd: ‘Needle in Haystack’ Search Capability

April 18, 2012 Comments off

nanopatentsandinnovations.blogspot

Identifying people by acquiring pictures of their eyes is becoming easier, according to a new report* from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). NIST researchers evaluated the performance of iris recognition software from 11 different organizations and found that some techniques produced very rapid results—though this speed was often at the cost of accuracy.

According to a NIST report, software that identifies people based on scans of the iris, the ‘colored’ part of the eye that surrounds the pupil, can produce very rapid results, but this speed is often at the cost of accuracy.

Credit: Talbott/NIST

Iris recognition, a form of biometric identification based on noncontact imaging of the complex texture in an individual’s iris, has been purported to be both fast and accurate—claims that had not been validated until now. The Iris Exchange (IREX) III report is the first public and independent comparison of commercially available algorithms that use iris recognition for the challenging task of finding an individual match within a large database of potential identities. Previous published studies only used single algorithms or considered “one-to-one” verification, in which an Read more…

NYPD Forces Retina Scan on Occupy Wall Street Activists

March 22, 2012 Comments off

popdecay

It remains unclear whether there is compelling state interest in forcing retina scans on peaceful protesters exercising their right to free speech in a public place, but that’s just what the New York Police Department is doing to the Occupy Wall Street activists.

Over 90 Occupy Wall Street protesters were arrested Saturday afternoon, and some were arraigned yesterday in Manhattan Criminal Court, but not before learning that the cost of their bail would spike exponentially — or that the opportunity to post bail would be denied arbitrarily – if protesters did not submit to retina scans.

Activists and lawyers alike were surprised yesterday to learn that Read more…

5 Things You Should Know About the FBI’s Massive New Biometric Database

January 11, 2012 Comments off

alternet.org

The FBI claims that their fingerprint database (IAFIS) is the “largest biometric database in the world,” containing records for over a hundred million people. But that’s nothing compared to the agency’s plans for Next Generation Identification (NGI), a massive, billion-dollar upgrade that will hold iris scans, photos searchable with face recognition technology, palm prints, and measures of gait and voice recordings alongside records of fingerprints, scars, and tattoos.

Ambitions for the final product are candidly spelled out in an agency report: “The FBI recognizes a need to collect as much biometric data as possible within information technology systems, and to make this information accessible to all levels of law enforcement, including International agencies.” (A stack of documents related to NGI was obtained by the Center for Constitutional Rights and others after a FOIA lawsuit.)

It’ll be “Bigger — Better — Faster,” the FBI brags on their Web site. Unsurprisingly, civil libertarians have concerns about the Read more…

e-Passports to add more biometrics by 2014

September 13, 2011 1 comment

eetindia

IMS Research finds a rapid migration from paper or machine readable passports to smart card-based passports (complying with the ICAO standard for e-Passports) started in 2007, leading to nearly half of all passports now in use being e-Passports.

Within five years 90 per cent of passport holders will be using e-passports that integrate a smart card IC chip, according to IMS Research in its report titled, “Electronic Government and Health Care ID Cards – World – 2011.”

“This trend is set to Read more…

Police Use of iPhone Iris Scanners Raise Privacy Concerns

July 21, 2011 Comments off

siliconangle

The so-called “biometric” technology, which seems to take a page from TV shows like “MI-5″ or “CSI,” could improve speed and accuracy in some routine police work in the field.  Dozens of police departments nationwide are gearing up to use a tech company’s already controversial iris- and facial-scanning device that slides over an iPhone and helps identify a person or track criminal suspects.

But its use has set off alarms with some people who are more concerned about possible civil liberties and privacy issues.  Constitutional rights advocates are concerned, in part because the device can accurately scan an individual’s face from up to four feet away, potentially without a person’s being aware of it.

“This is (the technology) stepping out of the cruiser and riding on the officer’s belt, along with his flashlight, his handcuffs, his sidearm or the other myriad tools,” said John Birtwell, spokesman for the Plymouth County Sheriff’s Department in southeastern Massachusetts, one of the first departments to use the devices.

“What we don’t want is for them to become a general surveillance tool, where the Read more…

Cops to Get Facial Recognition Devices; Will They Need Warrants to Use Them?

July 14, 2011 1 comment

abajournal

Police departments in several states are getting new high-tech devices that can scan irises, recognize faces and collect fingerprints.

The devices, made by BI2 Technologies, are attached to an iPhone for immediate searches of criminal databases, the Wall Street Journal (sub. req.) reports. The development is “raising significant questions about privacy and civil liberties,” the story says.

Currently the technology, called “Moris” for Mobile Offender Recognition and Information System, is used by the military to identify insurgents. But B12 has Read more…