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Posts Tagged ‘Milky Way Galaxy’

Astronomers find the oldest known star in the universe

August 12, 2013 Comments off

digitaljournal.com

A Digitized Sky Survey image of the Methuselah Star, the oldest known star in our galaxy.Scientists have discovered Methuselah, what is being called and “impossible star,” which appears to be potentially older than the universe.
The Milky Way’s own Methuselah star, formerly knows as HD 140283, seems to be between 14 to 16 billion years old, which is providing a bit of a continuity error in science, since most researches believe the universe to be 13.8 billion years old. However, a team of scientists have worked to try and come up with an explanation for the paradoxical star, accounting several factors such as its distance from us, its brightness and its structure. These scientists have been able to place the star back to approximately 14.5 billion years— still making it older than the universe. But with a margin of error of 800 million years, this can put the star at 13.7 billion years old, possibly making it younger than the universe (but just barely). Discovered over a century ago, the ancient star was found to be moving more than an astonishing 800,000 mph (1.3 million km/h) relative to our own galaxy. Originally born in a dwarf galaxy, which the Milky Way “ate” 12 billion years ago. Now the star, which has become more of a red giant, is a distant 190.1 light-years away in the Libra constellation and continues a long orbit around our galaxy.

 

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SOFIA Spots Recent Starburst in the Milky Way Galaxy’s Center

January 9, 2013 Comments off

nanopatentsandinnovations

Researchers using the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) have captured new images of a ring of gas and dust seven light-years in diameter surrounding the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, and of a neighboring cluster of extremely luminous young stars embedded in dust cocoons.

The images of our galaxy’s circumnuclear ring (CNR) and its neighboring quintuplet cluster (QC) are the subjects of two posters presented this week during the American Astronomical Society’s meeting in Long Beach, Calif. Ryan Lau of Cornell University and his collaborators studied the CNR. Matt Hankins of the University of Central Arkansas in Conway is lead author of the other paper, regarding the QC.

SOFIA/FORCAST mid-infrared image of the Milky Way galaxy’s nucleus showing the Circumnuclear Ring (CNR) of gas and dust clouds orbiting Read more…
Categories: astronomy Tags: ,

Strange Energy From Galactic Center Bombarding Earth

September 14, 2012 Comments off

beforeitsnews.com

Strange particles believed to be emanating from the elusive ‘dark matter’ at the center of the galaxy have been confirmed to be bombarding Earth. Two physicists from the prestigious Department of Physics & Astronomy at University of California discovered more gamma-rays bombarding Earth than believed by astronomers. The stream of electromagnetic radiation (spewed by the process of intensive radioactive decay and other other high-energy emmisions) may be triggering the bizarre mutation of matter and an incredible energy cloud that an astrophysicist says threatens Earth.

According to a groundbreaking investigation conducted by two UC Irvine astrophysicists and submitted to the peer-reviewed American Physical Society journal Physical Review, colliding particles of dark matter may be creating a maelstrom of turbulent energy deep in the heart of the Milky Way Galaxy. Among the particles streaming from the Read more…

Galactic Cosmic Ray Volleys: A Coming Global Disaster (Video)s

April 18, 2012 Comments off

starburstfound.org

This is a very interesting interview with Dr. Paul LaViolette regarding the superwave theory.  The interview is pretty lengthy, however, it provides much insight on how our position in the Milkyway Galaxy will affect us. 

Galactic core outbursts are the most energetic phenomenon taking place in the universe. During the early 60′s astronomers began to realize that the massive object that forms the core of a spiral or giant elliptical galaxy periodically becomes active spewing out a fierce barrage of cosmic rays with a total energy output equal to hundreds of thousands of supernova explosions(1, 2). The cosmic ray electron component of such an outburst is always accompanied by synchroton emission which consists of electromagnetic radiation ranging from Read more…

NASA Mystified By Enormous Energy Field

April 12, 2012 Comments off

zengardner.com

by Zen Gardner

The revelations of our energetic Universe keep on coming from many sources, including NASA’s new satellites, and it’s quite remarkable.

The observable Universe is something mankind has read as a language since the beginning. The unobservable worlds have always been the realm of philosophers, religious expressions and the esoteric sciences.

Are they coming together via modern technology, as we approach the Singularity as some call it, as a manifestation of some sort of consciousness shift?

I think so.

The video below was sent to me by a dear friend at Philosophers Stone in confirmation of my last post on this subject. It so blew my mind I wanted to get it out there as a sequel of sorts and to reinforce the above.

Scientists In Awe

More information being collected by higher and higher technology is making some seriously profound discoveries.

NASA’s Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope is finding hundreds of new objects at the very edge of the electromagnetic spectrum. Many of them have one thing in common: Astronomers have no idea what they are. Read more…

The Milky Way Contains At Least 100 Billion Planets According to Survey

January 12, 2012 Comments off

spaceref.com

Our Milky Way galaxy contains a minimum of 100 billion planets according to a detailed statistical study based on the detection of three extrasolar planets by an observational technique called microlensing.

Kailash Sahu, of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., is part of an international team reporting today that our galaxy contains a minimum of one planet for every star on average. This means that there should be a minimum of 1,500 planets within just 50 light-years of Earth.

The results are based on observations taken over six years by the PLANET (Probing Lensing Anomalies NETwork) collaboration, which Sahu co-founded in 1995. The study concludes that there are far more Earth-sized planets than bloated Jupiter- sized worlds. This is based on calibrating a planetary mass function that shows the number of planets increases for lower mass worlds. A rough estimate from this survey would point to Read more…

Categories: astronomy Tags: ,

Launch of ‘Bullets’ In A Black Hole’s Jet

January 11, 2012 1 comment

nanopatentsandinnovations.blogspot.com

Using observations from NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite and the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope, an international team of astronomers has identified the moment when a black hole in our galaxy launched super-fast knots of gas into space.
X-ray and radio data let astronomers pinpoint when the black hole system H1743-322 ejected powerful gas ‘bullets’ during its mid-2009 outburst. In this animation, an X-ray hot spot in the gas around the black hole produced signals of rising frequency as the spot moved closer to the black hole. When the bullets were ejected June 3, the hot spot vanished.