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Posts Tagged ‘money’

New World Order – The endgame has begun

December 23, 2013 Comments off

news-beacon-ireland

The nature of power in today’s world

The central bank system

 “Let me issue and control a nation‘s money and I care not who writes the laws.”

– Amschel Rothschild

 

Perhaps the single most important thing to know about power in the world today is that most nations do not have control over their own currencies. Instead privately owned, for-profit central banks – such as the Federal Reserve Bank in the US – create money out of nothing and then loan it at interest to their respective governments. This is an incredibly profitable scam, but that’s not the worst of it.

Not only do the central banks have the power to create money for free, they also have the power to set interest rates, to decide how much credit is issued, and to decide how much money is put into circulation. With this power central banks can – and do – orchestrate boom and bust cycles, enabling the super-wealthy owners of the banks to profit from investments during the booms, and buy up assets at bargain prices during the busts. And that still isn’t the whole story.

The most profitable of all central bank activities has been the financing of major wars, particularly the two World Wars. When nations are engaged in warfare, with their very survival at stake, the governments stretch their resources to the limit in the competition to prevail. The struggle to get more financing becomes as important as the competition on the battlefield. Moneylenders love a desperate borrower, and vast fortunes have been made by extending credit to both sides in conflicts: the longer a war continues, the more Full Article Here

Is a cashless society inevitable?

April 17, 2012 Comments off

cbc.ca

 An RCMP officer holds Canada’s new $100 banknote, which is made from plastic polymer and is designed to last longer and thwart counterfeiters. (Fabiola Carletti/CBC) Sweden and several other countries are experimenting with cash-free transactions, a trend that is fuelling debate about the need for tangible currency.

Readers were quick to offer their two cents onFriday’s editorial about the idea, “The International movement for the end of cash” by CBC’s Brent Bambury.

The majority of commenters were resistant to the idea of a cashless society, citing everything from decreased privacy and higher-tech crime to corporate control and technological vulnerabilities.

  • “Without strict laws, too, a cashless society will be one in which you have no fiscal privacy. Far from being more secure, intangible assets that Read more…

Canada Launches Its Own Virtual Cash, Called MintChip

April 12, 2012 Comments off

popsci.com

Canadian Penny Is No More mrgreen09 via Flickr

Next time you visit Canada, you might use digital currency to purchase your poutine, using something called MintChip backed by the Canadian government. The Royal Canadian Mint announced it’s getting rid of the penny and starting a new e-currency instead, and it wants the software community to help develop it.

The government just launched the MintChip Challenge— which was apparently so popular it’s already fully registered — to seek new digital payment apps for this new virtual currency. The idea is sort of a hybrid, combining the convenience of electronic transactions and the anonymity of cash. It will work via SD cards, but it will have no personal information or bank account data associated with it (so they say). It’s sort of like BitCoin but with actual, government-backed value.

The four-month contest includes 500 developers who will build apps that can demonstrate MintChip’s value. They’ll have to work on a variety of smartphone and desktop browsers. The prize: Solid gold wafers and coins worth about $50,000.

Its anonymity is a pretty unique idea. Other electronic payment systems — PayPal, Square, NFC-enabled phones, etc. — all connect to a person’s credit card or bank account. But cash is a great equalizer; you don’t need to have good credit to use it. MintChip would enable the same type of low-cost transactions for which you’d normally use cash. A Canadian banking group called Interac estimates that small-value transactions under $20 are worth $90 billion to the Canadian economy, the Toronto Star reported.

MintChip still has some kinks to be ironed out, including privacy, security of the currency and other questions. But it’s certainly an interesting concept.

[via Slashdot]

Categories: Canada Tags: , , ,

The “cashless society” and Total Monetary Surveillance

April 4, 2012 1 comment

marketoracle

Photo Credit Infowars

Economic Collapse writes: Most people think of a cashless society as something that is way off in the distant future. Unfortunately, that is simply not the case. The truth is that a cashless society is much closer than most people would ever dare to imagine. To a large degree, the transition to a cashless society is being done voluntarily. Today, only 7 percent of all transactions in the United States are done with cash, and most of those transactions involve very small amounts of money. Just think about it for a moment. Where do you still use cash these days? If you buy a burger or if you purchase something at a flea market you will still use cash, but for any mid-size or large transaction the vast majority of people out there will use another form of payment. Our financial system is dramatically changing, and cash is rapidly becoming a thing of the past. We live in a digital world, and national governments and big banks are both encouraging the move away from paper currency and coins. But what would a cashless society mean for our future? Are there any dangers to such a system?

Those are very important questions, but most of the time both sides of the issue are not presented in a balanced way in the mainstream media. Instead, most mainstream news articles tend to trash cash and talk about how wonderful digital currency is.

For example, a recent CBS News article declared that soon we may not need “that raggedy dollar bill” any longer and that the “greenback may soon be a goner”…. Read more…

Canada Scraps the Penny

April 4, 2012 Comments off

theepochtimes.com

Canada’s federal budget, released last week, includes the decision to end production of the penny. (Matthew Little/The Epoch Times)

TORONTO—Penny pinchers in Canada may soon turn their attention to nickels and dimes given the news in the country’s federal budget that just came down: pennies are being discontinued.

“Given its declining purchasing value, some Canadians consider the penny more of a nuisance than a useful coin,” notes the announcement that came with the publication of budget.

Credit, debit, and electronic transactions will keep exact purchase prices, but cash transactions will round prices that end in 3 cents up to 5 cents, and round prices that end in 2 cents down to zero.

While the Royal Canadian Mint will stop producing the penny, the coin will Read more…

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: , ,

Secretive Plan For a Global Currency

March 22, 2011 Comments off

www.globalresearch

Excerpt from “The Global Economic Crisis: The Great Depression of the XXI Century”
by Ellen Brown ~ Global Research
The following is an excerpt of a chapter by Ellen Brown from the new book by Global Research Publishers, “The Global Economic Crisis: The Great Depression of the XXI Century.” 

Michel Chossudovsky
Andrew Gavin Marshall (editors)

 

 

Help us get the word out, “like” the book on Facebook, comment, and share with friends!

By acting together to fulfill these pledges we will bring the world economy out of recession and prevent a crisis like this from recurring in the future. We are committed to take all necessary actions to restore the normal flow of credit through the financial system and ensure the soundness of systemically important institutions, implementing our policies in line with the agreed G20 framework for restoring lending and repairing the financial sector. We have agreed to support a general SDR allocation which will inject $250bn into the world economy and increase global liquidity.– G20 Communiqué, London, April 2, 2009

Towards a New Global Currency?

Is the Group of Twenty Countries (G20) envisaging the creation of a Global Central bank? Who or what would serve as this global central bank, cloaked with the power to issue the global currency and police monetary policy for all humanity? When the world’s central bankers met in Washington in September 2008 at the height of the financial meltdown, they discussed what body might be in a position to serve in that awesome and fearful role. A former governor of the Bank of England stated:

The answer might already be staring us in the face, in the form of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS)… The Read more…

The Chinese government started stockpiling food 3 years ago: What has the US government been doing beside spending money we don’t have?

March 1, 2011 Comments off

nowpublic.com

I wrote this three years ago, when the Chinese were reportedly stockpiling food in their cities. The world economic and political situation has worsened. With rising food prices, massive unemployment, union protests and government debt driving states to the brink of shut down and bankruptcy, the situation has worsened–and we owe the Chinese more than ever. ED.

by Monica Davis

Rumor has it that the Chinese government is advising its cities to start stockpiling food and fuel.  The government news agency reports that the central government has told the largest cities to stockpile at least two weeks of food, until the world economic turmoil caused by the banking industry’s foreclosure woes slows down.  Lots of luck on that.

With China’s exposure in the twitchy American financial markets, it is no wonder that the Chinese are getting nervous.  They have a lot at stake in the American economy, as do many foreign investors, past and present.

In a historical analysis of foreign investment in the United States, one writer notes that: Read more…