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Posts Tagged ‘Sumatra’

Number Of Recorded Earthquakes Rises Sharply

June 20, 2011 Comments off

irishweatheronline

Seismic chart showing 2011 Japan quake

Seismic chart showing 2011 Japan quake

2011 is on target to record the largest number of earthquakes in a single year for at least 12 years.

Research by Irish Weather Online, using data from the US Geological Survey (USGS), has found that earthquake activity (5.0-9.9 magnitude) from 01 January to 19 June 2011 is already exceeding the total annual seismic activity for the years 2001, 2002 and 2003.  2011’s total number of recorded earthquakes is also expected to exceed the most seismically active year of the past 12 years, 2007.

A total of 1,445 earthquakes, ranging in magnitude from 5.0 to 9.9, have been recorded in the year up to 19 June. The total number of earthquakes recorded globally for the entire of 2007 was 2,270.

The massive earthquakes in Japan (2011), Chile (2010), Sichuan (2008), Sumatra (2005 and 2008) and Indonesia (2004) have served to remind us of the devastating impact of earthquakes on life and property.  While the number of earthquakes ranging Read more…

Is this the age of megaquakes?

April 19, 2011 1 comment

msn

Kyodo / Reuters

Buildings tossed together by the tsunami is seen in Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan March 12, 2011. Scientists are asking if another megaquake will strike in the next six years.

By John Roach

First there was the earthquake and tsunami in Sumatra in 2004. Chile was shaken and lashed violently a year ago. Japan is still reeling from the twin disasters on March 11. It seems as if the Earth has woken from a long slumber and is violently re-jiggering its plates. Is there any truth to the notion?

The question of megaquake clustering, which I explored in the days following the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, was a hot topic of conversation Thursday at the Seismological Society of America’s annual meeting in Memphis, Tenn., according to various media reports.

There, Charles Bufe, a seismologist retired from the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver, said the spate of recent megaquakes is very similar to a string of seven magnitude 8.5 or greater quakes that struck between 1950 and 1965. The intervening decades, he noted, were quiet.

Bufe and USGS colleague David Perkins analyzed the clustering and concluded that Read more…

Japan quake set Texas aquifer in motion

March 22, 2011 Comments off

star-telegram

When the earth shook during the March 11 earthquake off Japan, it had enough force to move water deep inside the Edwards Aquifer in Central Texas.

Within 15 minutes of the magnitude-9.0 earthquake, the Edward Aquifer Authority’s J-17 monitoring well in Bexar County started to vibrate, with the water level fluctuating about a foot.

“It moved up and down for almost two hours,” said Roland Ruiz, a spokesman for the water authority. “We thought it was certainly interesting that a quake that far away would register in the aquifer.”

It isn’t the first time vibrations from earthquakes have shown up in the aquifer. Last year’s 8.8 quake in Chile and 7.0 temblor in Haiti were also detected.

The Dec. 26, 2004, earthquake off Sumatra, Indonesia, caused the largest fluctuation in the aquifer when the water level moved about 2.6 feet. That 9.1 quake triggered a tsunami that killed more than 200,000 people.

The Edwards Aquifer Authority provides water to 1.7 million people in South Central Texas, including San Antonio.

“It just seems to be a natural ripple effect felt halfway around the world,” said Ruiz, who added that the “sloshing around” inside the aquifer did not create any problems.

Bill Hanna, 817-390-7698

The megaquake connection: Are huge earthquakes linked?

March 18, 2011 Comments off

newscientist.com

The recent cluster of huge quakes around the Pacific Ocean has fuelled speculation that they are seismically linked. New Scientist examines the evidence

A wave of activity (Image: Bernd Settnik/EPA/Corbis)

A wave of activity (Image: Bernd Settnik/EPA/Corbis)

AT 2.46 pm local time on Friday last week, Japan shook like never before. The magnitude 9.0 earthquake wrenched the main island of Honshu 2.5 metres closer to the US and nudged the tilt of Earth’s axis by 16 centimetres. At the epicentre, 130 kilometres offshore, the Pacific tectonic plate lurched westwards, and a 10-metre-high tsunami sped towards the coastal city of Sendai and the surrounding region.

The devastation caused by the events is difficult to exaggerate – estimates suggest the number of fatalities could top 10,000. One of the few consolations is that quakes of magnitude 8.5 and above are rare: the Sendai earthquake is in the top 10 of the highest-magnitude quakes of the last 100 years.

Yet three of these – the December 2004 Sumatra quake, the February 2010 Chile quake, and now Sendai – have struck in just over six years. This presents a horrifying possibility: Read more…

Geologist Predicts Major N. America Earthquake Imminent (Video)

March 16, 2011 8 comments

This is a very interesting interview with Jim Berkland who is an accredited geologist that worked with the U.S. Geological Survey and predicted the 1989 world series earthquake in San Francisco 4 days before its occurrence.  Mr. Berkland explains the correlation regarding the super moon, equinoctial tide, strange animal deaths, and the current seismic window causing the earthquake catastrophes that we have witnessed in Chile, Sumatra, New Zealand, and currently Japan.  My advice is if you are on the west coast and if you are able to-leave.  I am not a fear monger but I do take precaution, especially with all of the accredited reports that are available all over the internet.  Our heart and prayers are going out to all whom are affected by the quakes.

Read more…

Japan Quake Shifts Earth Axis: Though Slight, Days Will Be Shortened In Centuries

March 13, 2011 Comments off

conservativerefocus

https://i0.wp.com/astrobob.areavoices.com/astrobob/images/Earth_wobble_earthquake.jpg

The Montreal Gazette

By Carmen Chai, Postmedia News

Initial results out of Italy’s National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology show that the 8.9-magnitude earthquake that rattled Japan Friday shifted the earth’s rotation axis by about 25 centimetres.

INGV’s report, which came hours after the devastating incident, is equivalent to “very, very tiny” changes that won’t be seen for centuries, though, Canadian geologists say.

Only after centuries would a second be lost as each day is shortened by a millionth of a second, according to University of Toronto geology professor Andrew Miall.

“Ten inches sounds like Read more…