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Posts Tagged ‘tetonic plates’

Russia: “4 Hectares of New Land Emerged, from the Shift of Tectonic Plates”

September 14, 2011 1 comment

poleshift.ning.com

Apologies to Alexsandr, from whose Q to the Z’s on the 9/3 Q & A Chat I borrowed this. I feel this deserves a blog post. Land appearing virtually overnite from admitted plate activity. This is just more proof of Planet X’s influence, IMO.

Below a Google translation of a report, source of which, including video, here.

Amazing natural phenomenon has been documented in recent days. Huge beds of clay and stone rose by about 5 meters above the Sea of ​​Azov in the Temryuk district of Krasnodar region, forming a peninsula.

Scientists suggest that the cause of the “new lands” have awakened mud volcanoes, and seismologists have Read more…

Huge ‘Ocean’ Discovered Inside Earth

August 30, 2011 Comments off

livescience

This article was published a few years back but it is still very interesting.

Scientists scanning the deep interior of Earth have found evidence of a vast water reservoir beneath eastern Asia that is at least the volume of the Arctic Ocean.

The discovery marks the first time such a large body of water has found in the planet’s deep mantle.

The finding, made by Michael Wysession, a seismologist at Washington University in St. Louis, and his former graduate student Jesse Lawrence, now at the University of California, San Diego, will be detailed in a forthcoming monograph to be published by Read more…

Scientists Study Future Megathrust Earthquake In Pacific Northwest

July 29, 2011 Comments off

irishweatheronline

Seismic chart showing the Japan quake on 11 March 2011

Seismic chart showing the Japan quake on 11 March 2011

The Olympic Peninsula in Washington State, USA, and British Columbia, Canada, could be among the hardest hit locations in the event of a future megathrust earthquake along the Pacific coast.

A new study led by Simon Fraser University earth scientist Andy Calvert and published in Nature Geoscience this week indicates the depth of the fault between the two tectonic plates forming the Earth’s surface in the Pacific Northwest is seven kilometres deeper than previously proposed.

Calvert speculates it may mean part of the fault’s locked zone — where a megathrust earthquake can occur — could be beneath the Olympic Peninsula.

Calvert’s team studied a 200-kilometre section of a fault formed by the subduction of the oceanic Juan de Fuca plate under the Read more…

Puerto Rico, Gulf and Atlantic States — plate slippage soon

July 19, 2011 Comments off

Case Study: Tsunami in Seaside, Oregon

June 25, 2011 1 comment

carleton

Oregon Coast’s Vulnerability

tsunami map Recent research suggests that a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake could create tsunami waves that impact over 1,000-km of coastline in the U.S. and Canada. Source: USGS

The northwestern coast of Oregon is susceptible to both local and far-field tsunamis. The Cascadia Subduction Zone, where the eastward moving Juan de Fuca plate meets the westward moving North American Plate, is just off the Pacific Northwest coast of the United States and Canada. It is a 750-kilometer long fault zone. This area is very active tectonically, and therefore has the potential to produce large earthquakes and possibly, subsequent tsunamis. This subduction zone is thought to have last ruptured in 1700.

Additionally, far-field earthquakes throughout the Pacific are also capable of spawning tsunamis that could eventually reach the Oregon coast. Historical records show that since 1812, about 28 tsunamis with wave heights greater than one meter have reached the U.S. west coast. The March 1964 “Good Friday” earthquake created the most devastating of these tsunamis. The epicenter of this earthquake was near Anchorage, Alaska. The tsunami that followed this earthquake reached coasts all along the western U.S. within six hours. Cannon Beach, a small coastal community in northwestern Oregon was inundated during Read more…

Tectonic plates rattle- more turbulence at the South Pole

June 21, 2011 Comments off

theextinctionprotocol

June 21, 2011ANTARCTICA – A 5.5 magnitude earthquake struck the South Sandwich Islands region, situated around 750km south east of South Georgia, in the South Atlantic early Sunday.  It was the latest in a series of quakes to hit the Antarctic Region during the past 24 hours. The moderate quake struck at 9.37am GMT at a depth of 137km and was centered 69 km (42 miles) NNW of Visokoi Island and 330 km (205 miles) NNW of Bristol Island. The last significant earthquake to be recorded in the South Sandwich Islands region occurred on Read more…

Time to shift view of seismic risk – experts

May 25, 2011 Comments off

terradaily

Knowledge of seismic risk is badly skewed in favour of earthquakes that occur on plate boundaries, such as the March 11 temblor that hit northeast Japan, rather than those that strike deep inland, a pair of scientists said on Sunday.

In commentary appearing in the journal Nature Geoscience, Philip England of Oxford University and James Jackson of Cambridge University say that in seismic terms, the 9.0-magnitude Sendai quake was “a remarkable story of resilience.”

Good civic training and building construction meant that the death rate was “impressively low,” they said. Around 25,000 people died, or 0.4 percent of those exposed to the event, and most of these died from the tsunami that followed.

The March 11 event occurred on a plate boundary, where the jigsaw of plates that float on Earth’s crust jostle and grind and slide under each other.

England and Jackson say plate boundaries are relatively well-studied, but a far greater threat lurks in continental inland areas.

“Death rates in earthquakes within continental interiors have often exceeded five percent and can be as high as 30 percent,” they warn.

According to their count, over the past 120 years, there have been around Read more…