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Posts Tagged ‘volcanoes’

Deep Ocean Mysteries and Wonders

April 10, 2012 Comments off
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Ice Age, Supervolcano Could Topple US Government

March 16, 2012 Comments off

beforeitsnews

As more evidence mounts that the world is slipping faster into the next Ice Age, Washington insiders are scurrying to solidify their new power base for centralized government operations. Fears that the US capital might be struck by another more deadly terrorist attack—or other disasters—prompted federal agencies more than a decade ago to hurriedly establish back-up operations in case catastrophe struck. Despite the fact that many conspiracy theories are weaved around the subjects that follow—including some fairly wild-eyed, tin foil hat scenarios—most conspiracy theories have a basis in fact, albeit the facts are often distorted or wildly exaggerated. The actual story of the bizarre Denver International airport, the nation’s “second capital,” the impending Ice Age possibility, and the Yellowstone supervolcano threat to America follows…

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Climate change will shake the Earth

February 27, 2012 Comments off

guardian

As the Earth's crust buckles, volcanic activity will increase.

As the Earth’s crust buckles, volcanic activity will increase. Photograph: Corbis

The idea that a changing climate can persuade the ground to shake, volcanoes to rumble and tsunamis to crash on to unsuspecting coastlines seems, at first, to be bordering on the insane. How can what happens in the thin envelope of gas that shrouds and protects our world possibly influence the potentially Earth-shattering processes that operate deep beneath the surface? The fact that it does reflects a failure of our imagination and a limited understanding of the manner in which the different physical components of our planet – the atmosphere, the oceans, and the solid Earth, or geosphere – intertwine and interact.

If we think about climate change at all, most of us do so in a very simplistic way: so, the weather might get a bit warmer; floods and droughts may become more of a problem and sea levels will slowly creep upwards. Evidence reveals, however, that our planet is an almost unimaginably complicated beast, which reacts to a dramatically changing climate in all manner of different ways; a few – like the aforementioned – straightforward and predictable; some Read more…

El Hierro Submarine Volcano Eruption

February 16, 2012 Comments off

Irish_Weather_Online

Posted Image

Four months after it began, the underwater volcanic eruption off El Hierro Island (Canaries) persists. This natural-color satellite image, collected on February 10, 2012, shows the site of the eruption, near the fishing village of La Restinga.

Bright aquamarine water indicates high concentrations of volcanic material. Immediately above the vent, a patch of brown water resembles a turbulent hot tub and indicates when and where the eruption is strongest. Video of the eruption shows the activity in more detail.

This image was acquired by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. The eruption is just off the southern coast of El Hierro, the youngest of the Canary Islands. El Hierro is about 460 kilometers (290 miles) west of Morocco and Western Sahara.

According to El Hierro Digital, measurements of the sea floor by the Instituto Oceanográfico Español found that the volcano’s summit is now only 120 meters (390 feet) beneath the ocean surface—10 meters (30 feet) higher than it was in mid-January. The height of the erupting cone is about 210 meters (690 feet) above the former ocean bottom, with a total volume over 145 million cubic meters (512 million cubic feet) of new material.

NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data. Caption by Robert Simmon. Instrument: EO-1 – ALI

Magma Causing Uplift in Oregon

January 5, 2012 Comments off

ouramazingplanet.com

Caption: The Three Sisters area — which contains five volcanoes — is only about 170 miles (274 km) from Mount St. Helens, which erupted in 1980. Both are part of the Cascades Range, a line of 27 volcanoes stretching from British Columbia in Canada to northern California. This perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color ASTER image over digital topography from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset. Credit: NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

Volcanic activity is causing the earth to rise in Oregon, scientists have found.

Though whether such uplift is a sign of an imminent eruption remains uncertain.

As early as the summer of 1996, a 230-square-mile (600-square-kilometer) patch of ground in Oregon began to rise. The area lies just west of the South Sister Volcano, which with the North and Middle Sisters form the Three Sisters volcanoes, the most prominent peaks in the central Oregon stretch of the Cascade Mountains.

Although this region has not seen an eruption in at least 1,200 years, the scattered hints of volcanic activity here have been a cause of concern, leading to continuous satellite-based monitoring. Now 14 years of data is revealing just how the Earth is changing there and the likely cause of the uplift — a reservoir of magma invading the Read more…

EcoAlert –Iceland’s Laki Volcano may be Poised for a Massive Historic Eruption

September 21, 2011 1 comment

dailygalaxy

Flickr-2772596793-image What if one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recent history happened today? A new study suggests that a blast akin to the Laki eruption that devastated Iceland in the 1780s would waft noxious gases southwestward and kill tens of thousands of people in Europe. And in a modern world that is intimately connected by air traffic and international trade, economic activity across much of Europe, including the production and import of food, could plummet. At least four Laki-sized eruptions have occurred in Iceland in the past 1,150 years.

From June of 1783 until February of 1784, the Laki volcano in south-central Iceland erupted, spewing an estimated 122 million metric tons of Read more…

3 New Zealand Super Volcanoes Are Rumbling!

September 2, 2011 Comments off

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Another beautiful eruption of Mt Etna (Italy) on August 29 2011 + videos

August 30, 2011 Comments off

earthquake-report

Enjoy the 12the paroxysm of Mount Etna, Sicily’s most famous volcano.
On the early morning of 29 August 2011, the 12th paroxysmal eruptive episode of this year occurred at the New Southeast Crater, almost 8 days after its predecessor.
This event generated tall lava fountains and an eruption column that caused ash falls in the southeast sector of the volcano, as well as various lava flows down the western slope of the Valle del Bove.
During this paroxysm, the southeastern flank of the pyroclastic cone of the New Southeast Crater fractured, with the opening of several eruptive vents down to the base of the cone, which Read more…

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New underwater volcanic vents discovered along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

August 17, 2011 Comments off

theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com

August 16, 2011MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE – The Irish-led VENTuRE scientific expedition aboard the national research vessel RV Celtic Explorer has discovered a previously uncharted field of hydrothermal vents along the mid-Atlantic ridge – the first to be explored north of the Azores. The mission, led by Dr. Andy Wheeler of University College, Cork (UCC), together with scientists from the National Oceanographic Centre and the University of Southampton in the UK, NUI Galway and the Geological Survey of Ireland, returned to Cork today (August 4th) from an investigation 3,000 metres below the surface of the sea using the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Holland 1. Hydrothermal vents, which spew mineral-rich seawater heated to boiling point by volcanic rock in the Earth’s crust below, are home to

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Surprise Underwater Volcanic Eruption Discovered

August 10, 2011 Comments off
axial-volcano-lava-110809-02.jpgThe chain is all that is visible of an ocean-bottom hydrophone, an instrument that detects earthquakes, buried in about six feet of new lava produced by a recent eruption at the Axial Seamount. Credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University, © Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

An undersea volcano has erupted off the coast of Oregon, spewing forth a layer of lava more than 12 feet (4 meters) thick in some places, and opening up deep vents that belch forth a cloudy stew of hot water and microbes from deep inside the Earth.

Scientists uncovered evidence of the early April eruption on a routine expedition in late July to the Axial Seamount, an underwater volcano that Read more…