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Archive for January 12, 2012

Some earthquakes expected along Rio Grande Rift in Colorado and New Mexico, new study says

January 12, 2012 Comments off

physorg.com

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(PhysOrg.com) — The Rio Grande Rift, a thinning and stretching of Earth’s surface that extends from Colorado’s central Rocky Mountains to Mexico, is not dead but geologically alive and active, according to a new study involving scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences.  

“We don’t expect to see a lot of earthquakes, or big ones, but we will have some earthquakes,” said CU-Boulder geological sciences Professor Anne Sheehan, also a fellow at CIRES. The study also involved collaborators from the University of New Mexico, New Mexico Tech, Utah State University and the Boulder-headquartered UNAVCO. The Rio Grande Rift follows the path of the Rio Grande River from central roughly to El Paso before turning southeast toward the Gulf of Mexico.

Sheehan was not too surprised when a 5.3 magnitude struck about 9 miles west of Trinidad, Colo., in the vicinity of the Rio Grande Rift on Aug. 23, 2011.  The quake was the largest in Read more…

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Biometrics in Argentina: Mass Surveillance as a State Policy

January 12, 2012 Comments off

advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org

Two years ago, the UK dismantled their national ID scheme and shredded their National Identity Registry in response to great public outcry over the privacy-invasive program. Unfortunately privacy protections have been less rosy elsewhere. In Argentina, the national ID fight was lost some time ago. A law enacted during the military dictatorship forced all individuals to obtain a government-mandated ID. Now, they are in the process of enhancing its mandatory National Registry of Persons (RENAPER) with biometric data such as fingerprints and digitized faces. The government plans to repurpose this database in order to facilitate “easyaccess” to law enforcement by merging this data into a new, security-focused integrated system. This raises the specter of mass surveillance, as Argentinean law enforcement will have access to Read more…

Syria-bound ship with arms changes course

January 12, 2012 1 comment

upi.com

LIMASSOL, Cyprus, Jan. 11 (UPI) — Cyprus allowed a Russian-owned ship suspected of carrying ammunition bound for Syria to leave port after agreeing to switch course, officials said Wednesday.

The St. Vincent-Grenadines-flagged ship Chariot was heading from St. Petersburg, Russia, to the Syrian port Latakia when it made an unscheduled docking at the Cypriot port Limassol Tuesday for refueling after bad weather, RIA Novosti reported.

The ship was allowed to return to sea Wednesday, but Cypriot officials gave no indication of its new destination.

“It has been decided the vessel will be released after the ship decided to change its destination and will not go to Syria,” Cypriot government spokesman Stefanos Stefanou said.

The Cypriot Foreign Ministry said the ship carried a “dangerous cargo,” but didn’t violate the European Union arms embargo on Syria.

Cypriot media said the Chariot, owned by the St. Petersburg firm Westberg Ltd., was carrying 35-60 tons of ammunition and explosives meant for the Syrian Defense Ministry.

Seized Iranian ammunition exploded in July near Cyprus’ biggest power station, killing 13 people, RIA Novosti said.

Water supplies may run out by 2030 in India: Study

January 12, 2012 1 comment

dnaindia.com

Palmer Drought Severity Index, which assigns positive numbers when conditions are unusually wet for a particular region, and negative numbers when conditions are unusually dry. A reading of -4 or below is considered extreme drought. Regions that are blue or green will likely be at lower risk of drought, while those in the red and purple spectrum could face more unusually extreme drought conditions. (Courtesy Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews, redrawn by UCAR. This image is freely available for media use.

Water supplies will begin running out in critical regions where they support cities, industries and food production — including in India, China and the Middle East — by 2030 due to over-extraction of groundwater, a scientist has warned.

“The world has experienced a boom in groundwater use, more than doubling the rate of extraction between 1960 and 2000 — with usage continuing to soar up to the present,” says Craig Simmons, director of the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT).

A recent satellite study has revealed falling groundwater tables in the US, India, China, Middle East and North Africa, where expanding agriculture and cities have increased water demand.

“Groundwater currently makes up about Read more…

China to fingerprint all foreigners

January 12, 2012 1 comment

homelandsecuritynewswire.com

Chinese lawmakers are currently considering new visa rules that would require all visitors working and studying in the country to have their fingerprints scanned as they enter and exit

China will join other East Asian countries in fingerprinting foreigners // Source: net.mk

All foreigners entering and exiting China could soon be fingerprinted by customs officials.

Chinese lawmakers are currently considering new visa rules that would require all visitors working and studying in the country to have their fingerprints scanned.

The rules would only apply to foreigners requesting residence visas, which allow an individual to stay in the country for six months or more. Business people, journalists, and students, who typically apply for residence visas, would be affected Read more…

Iran nuclear scientist Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan killed by magnetic bomb in Tehran

January 12, 2012 2 comments

dailymail

Target: Mostafa Ahmadi-Roshan who was killed in Tehran today when two motorcyclists attached a magnetic bomb attached to a carTarget: Mostafa Ahmadi-Roshan who was killed in Tehran today when two motorcyclists attached a magnetic bomb attached to a car

Iran yesterday blamed the U.S. and Israel for the assassination of a university professor and scientist who played a key role in the country’s controversial nuclear weapons programme.

Two hitmen on a motorcycle were said to attached a magnetic bomb to the car of Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan killing him and a passenger instantly as they sat in the Iranian-assembled Peugeot 405 in northern district of the capital Tehran.

A 32-year-old chemistry expert and director of the Natanz uranium enrichment facility in central Iran, Roshan was said to have been involved in Read more…

The Milky Way Contains At Least 100 Billion Planets According to Survey

January 12, 2012 Comments off

spaceref.com

Our Milky Way galaxy contains a minimum of 100 billion planets according to a detailed statistical study based on the detection of three extrasolar planets by an observational technique called microlensing.

Kailash Sahu, of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., is part of an international team reporting today that our galaxy contains a minimum of one planet for every star on average. This means that there should be a minimum of 1,500 planets within just 50 light-years of Earth.

The results are based on observations taken over six years by the PLANET (Probing Lensing Anomalies NETwork) collaboration, which Sahu co-founded in 1995. The study concludes that there are far more Earth-sized planets than bloated Jupiter- sized worlds. This is based on calibrating a planetary mass function that shows the number of planets increases for lower mass worlds. A rough estimate from this survey would point to Read more…

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