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Posts Tagged ‘fingerprints’

German Defense Minister von der Leyen’s fingerprint copied by Chaos Computer Club

December 31, 2014 Comments off

www.dw.de

A speaker at the yearly conference of the Chaos Computer Club has shown how fingerprints can be faked using only a few photographs. To demonstrate, he copied the thumbprint of the German defense minister.

Jan Krissler, also know by his alias “Starbug,” told a conference of hackers he has copied the thumbprint of German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen. Speaking at the 31st annual conference of the Chaos Computer Club in Hamburg, Krissler highlighted the dangers in relying on security technology.

Krissler explained that he didn’t even need an object that von der Leyen had touched to create the copy. Using several close-range photos in order to capture every angle, Krissler used a commercially available software called VeriFinger to create an image of the minister’s fingerprint.

Along with fellow hacker Tobias Fiebig, Krissler has been working at the Technical University of Berlin on research into weaknesses of

Read more…

China to fingerprint all foreigners

January 12, 2012 1 comment

homelandsecuritynewswire.com

Chinese lawmakers are currently considering new visa rules that would require all visitors working and studying in the country to have their fingerprints scanned as they enter and exit

China will join other East Asian countries in fingerprinting foreigners // Source: net.mk

All foreigners entering and exiting China could soon be fingerprinted by customs officials.

Chinese lawmakers are currently considering new visa rules that would require all visitors working and studying in the country to have their fingerprints scanned.

The rules would only apply to foreigners requesting residence visas, which allow an individual to stay in the country for six months or more. Business people, journalists, and students, who typically apply for residence visas, would be affected Read more…

Biometric Identification Will Replace Many Passwords In Next Five Years, Says IBM Scientist

January 5, 2012 1 comment

huffingtonpost

Passwords have been around since ancient history, but they may become obsolete sooner than you think. According to a recent prediction by IBM Speech CTO David Nahamoo, many of the problems with passwords will be solved by biometric systems that can identify individuals based on unique biological features.

It’s not just fingerprints, DNA and retinas anymore; the way you walk is unique and so is the way you type, for example. Orwell references may be inevitable, but the technology can be used for good as well, aiding in various interactive systems, from video games to cars to iPads, and otherwise making it easier to prove that you’re you.

For a long time, it was hard to use biometrics quickly and accurately in our daily lives, but the combination of various identifiers may make the systems convenient enough for widespread use. A recent column in InformationWeek points to the United States Visitor And Information Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) as a prime example of a system that’s been able to scale: “The enrollment and validation of these attributes is fast and accurate enough for use in everyday, large-scale deployments, and the Department of Homeland Security just announced it will pay Accenture Federal Services $71 million over 13 months to further improve the system.”

There’s also India’s massive biometric census project, which is Read more…

Mobile biometrics to hit US streets

August 3, 2011 Comments off

aljazeera

With new mobile gadgetry, suspects will no longer have to be taken to police stations for their fingerprints and irises to be scanned and recorded [GALLO/GETTY]

We’re fast approaching a time when law enforcement will no longer need to ask you for your identification – your physical self, and the biometric data therein, are all that will be required to identify you.

A gadget attached to a mobile phone can photograph and plot key points and features on your face (breaking the numbers down into biometric data), scan your iris and take your fingerprints on the spot.

This gizmo doesn’t exist in a futuristic world – it’s already been prototyped and tested. By autumn, the Mobile Offender Recognition and Information System (MORIS), which will allow 40 law enforcement agencies across the US to carry out such biometric diagnostics, will be rolled out. So far, the 1,000 units on order – at $3,000 and 12.5 oz per device – will be going to sheriff and police departments.

Proponents of the technology figure the Read more…

Cops to Get Facial Recognition Devices; Will They Need Warrants to Use Them?

July 14, 2011 1 comment

abajournal

Police departments in several states are getting new high-tech devices that can scan irises, recognize faces and collect fingerprints.

The devices, made by BI2 Technologies, are attached to an iPhone for immediate searches of criminal databases, the Wall Street Journal (sub. req.) reports. The development is “raising significant questions about privacy and civil liberties,” the story says.

Currently the technology, called “Moris” for Mobile Offender Recognition and Information System, is used by the military to identify insurgents. But B12 has Read more…

Global Biometric Forecast to 2012

May 18, 2011 Comments off

rncos

Biometric market has been growing as one of the fastest emerging markets for the past few years especially due to rising need for personal security concerns, and the advent of new technologies that offered numerous future growth opportunities. Recent developments, larger & wider scale adoption, significant capability & performance advancements, standards development, and consumer acceptance, indicate looming and substantial market expansion of the biometric industry.

Many governments across the world are adopting biometric technologies to strengthen national security and maintain individual identity. Besides, corporate security and identity theft are fueling growth in the global biometric market. According to our new research report “Global Biometric Forecast to 2012”, the global biometric market is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of around 23% during 2011 – 2013. The report explains prevalent market trends and future scenario of the biometric market in different verticals, technologies, and regions, underlining the future potential areas and key issues crucial for the market development.

Among the technologies, fingerprint recognition is possibly the most widely used and familiar biometric technology. Further, biometrics is also becoming a Read more…

House approves biometrics listing bill -MANILA, PHILIPPINES

May 13, 2011 Comments off

bworldonline

MANILA, PHILIPPINES

THE HOUSE of Representatives approved on second reading on Tuesday a bill that seeks to clean the voter record in preparation for the midterm elections in 2013.

The Web site of the Bills and Index service stated that House Bill 3469 requires all voters to have their biometrics data — photographs, fingerprints and signature — taken by an election officer.

The bill, aside from ensuring that the Automated Fingerprint Identification System will identify double registrants and other irregularities, is seen to also discourage cheating.

Data from the Commission on Elections (Comelec) showed that there were 704,542 voters with double or multiple registration in May 2010 general elections.

The bill defines such voters as those registered in more than one city or municipality.

Only half of the 50.8 million voters have biometrics data, the Comelec said.

The bill seeks to prohibit those without biometrics data from voting. Read more…

FBI center takes on $1 billion ID project

March 23, 2011 1 comment

wvgazette.com

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The Clarksburg FBI complex is taking part in a $1 billion project that will enable law enforcement agencies to identify criminals and terrorists by physical characteristics more quickly and accurately, an FBI official said Monday in Charleston.

Earlier this month, the FBI center unveiled its “Next Generation Identification System,” which will slowly replace an older system that can no longer handle the volume of fingerprints sent to Clarksburg.

“It’s bigger, better, faster,” said Stephen Morris, a deputy assistant director at the FBI Center. “It increases capacity and accuracy.”

Morris spoke Monday at a Charleston Rotary Club luncheon at the Civic Center.

The NGI system, built by Lockheed Martin, allows FBI employees to Read more…

Biometrics: dream come true or nightmare?

March 4, 2011 Comments off

computerworld.com

Having previously looked at how biometric recognition is more than a fictional spy-thriller, we didn’t look at biometric technology used in the past which seems like something out of the future. These are some of those past biometrics, followed by a few new biometric recognition technologies being proposed for everything from securing your smartphone, replacing the ID in your wallet, and even required testing to prove paternity.

From WikiLeaks diplomat cables, we discovered that the State Department is more interested in collecting biometric data than was previously disclosed. A cable supposedly from Hillary Clinton told certain embassies in Africa to collect more biographical information like fingerprints, facial images, DNA, and iris scans for U.S. Intelligence. Besides asking for “detailed biometric Read more…

DNA “Genetic Patdown” Introduced to Airports by DHS

February 28, 2011 Comments off
activistpost.com
NetBio — Rapid DNA Analysis Solutions

Nicholas West
Activist Post

A new level of invasive screening is scheduled for airports this summer:  a portable DNA scanner to conduct on-site, real-time genetic testing.

This technology is being implemented under the cover of combating human trafficking, illegal immigration, and finding missing persons, but Richard Seldon of NetBio, creator of the scanners, clearly states that “DNA information has the potential to become part of the fabric of day-to-day life.” In an interview with Katie Drummond who broke this story for The Daily, Seldon envisions additional applications in emergency rooms, food safety tests, and law enforcement.

DNA collection is actually nothing new, as the Pentagon has admitted that it currently has a DNA database with 80,000 suspected foreign terrorists on it, and growing daily.  However, this collection apparatus has been secretly in place for Americans as well.  Lawsuits are pending from families who uncovered a secret program to collect DNA from babies and store it in a military database.  However, that was a secret that had to be uncovered.  The fact that DNA screening is being rolled out openly marks a new level of blatant tyranny in America.

To a certain extent, DNA collection already has become part of the fabric of day-to-day life; police in America have had the authority to conduct warrantless searches since 2009 by taking blood and saliva during arrests, even from those not convicted of a crime.  This has quickly morphed into DNA being taken through mandatory blood tests at DUI checkpoints in Florida.

It has been argued that DNA extraction is no different than taking fingerprints.  This argument is patently absurd, due to the simple fact that fingerprints have no bearing on one’s genetic information . . . or manipulation.  It is the genetic information of individuals that has been the holy grail of all tyrannies as the endgame for their control grid.

The current focus on DNA extraction and databasing is a well-known globalist initiative stated by the UN to register every newborn.  This initiative has the full support of globalist and population-control advocate, Bill Gates, who would like to see a universal birth registry which would presumably tie in to his universal vaccine program.  Additionally, globalist behemoths such as the RAND Corporation have issued documents that identify an interest in biotechnology for the purpose of population reduction, cloning, and to “identify, understand, manipulate, improve, and control living organisms (including ourselves).”

It is important to note that the technology of tracking, tracing, and databasing innocent people right down to their blood is a top-down directive from federal agencies, not a legitimate scientific endeavor.  Legitimate science researches ways to increase human potential and freedom, not use it as a system for identification and control.  With the rise of nanotechnology as a federal initiative, we should strongly resist the collection of our life force to be used in any way that government-controlled science sees fit.