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Archive for the ‘Odd Weather’ Category

Historic Tornado Outbreak: 3 Days, 241 Tornadoes, 14 States

April 17, 2011 Comments off

accuweather

This image, courtesy of the National Weather Service Forecast Office in San Diego, Calif., shows tornado reports April 14-16, 2011 as of 12:00 p.m. EDT Sunday April 17, 2011..

From Thursday, April 14, 2011 to Saturday, April, 16, 2011, devastating tornadoes rampaged across communities of the southern United States. Cities and towns from Oklahoma to North Carolina were assaulted by the deadly twisters.

The tornado outbreak led to a total of 241 tornado reports in 14 states over the three-day period. This will likely rank this tornado outbreak among the largest in Read more…

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Map shows most of Northern Hemisphere is covered in snow and ice

February 4, 2011 Comments off



At first glance it looks like a graphic from a Discovery Channel program about a distant ice age. But this astonishing picture shows the world as it is today – with half the Northern Hemisphere covered with snow and ice.

The image was released by the National Oceanic And Atmospheric Association (NOAA) on the day half of North America was in the grip of a severe winter storm.

The map was created using multiple satellites from government agencies and the US Air Force.

That Antarctica, the Arctic, Greenland and the frozen wastes of Siberia are covered in white comes as no surprise. But it is the extent to which the line dips down over the Northern Hemisphere that is so remarkable about the image.

A new satellite map by the government agency NOAA shows the extent of the snow blanketing a vast area from the west coast of Canada to eastern China

The shroud of white stretches down from Alaska and sweeps through the Midwest and along to the Eastern seaboard. The bitter cold has reached as far as Texas and northern Mexico where in Ciudad Juarez temperatures today were expected to dip to minus 15C.

In the U.S. tens of millions of people chose to stay at home rather than venture out. In Chicago, 20in of snow fell leading to authorities closing schools for the first time in 12 years. The newspaper for Tulsa, Okalahoma, was unable to publish its print edition for the first time in Read more…

8 Strange Earth Changes That May Threaten Civilization

January 26, 2011 Comments off

Say what, two suns may be visible from Earth in 2012? Everyday we seem to be getting bombarded with warning signs that our planet is changing rapidly.  In fact, many of the changes are occurring for the first time in modern recorded history and all seem to indicate a need for civilization to adapt.

Record-breaking heat and cold are striking all corners of the globe; earthquake activity has spiked, even in places thought not to have active fault lines; birds, bees, fish, and other animals are dropping dead with no coherent cause, and there is a flurry of talk about galactic anomalies beginning to happen.

Since the man-made global warming theory has simmered down from a boil, many other concerns have surfaced that appear to minimize possible effects of CO2 concentrations as our greatest concern. Sure, many of these changes may be connected in some way, but the idea that there is a silver bullet to stop this train of collective events is unlikely.

One thing we can say is that we live in very interesting times.  These unprecedented events are accelerating at a blistering pace, as we hurl through space on this ball we call Earth. It seems this turbulent cycle is going to continue to manifest despite our best human efforts to stop it.  The only thing we can hope to do is digest the available information and plan for the worst, while hoping for the best.  Assuredly, humans possess a far greater ability to adapt through technology than the animal kingdom, yet we certainly can’t thrive without protecting the entire biosphere.

Here are 8 strange Earth changes that should demand our attention: Read more…

POLE SHIFT PHENOMENA REPORTED by RUSSIAN SCIENTISTS

January 23, 2011 4 comments

ALEXEY N. DMITRIEV

The Sun

Let’s begin with the Sun. The Sun is the center of our Solar System, and all life that is on this Earth came from the Sun. If there were no Sun, we would not be alive. This is simply scientific fact. And so any changes that occur in or on the Sun will eventually affect every person alive. The solar activity during this last sunspot cycle was greater than anything ever seen before. Yet every astronomer that I talked to about this except one insisted that everything was “normal.” That one person, who worked at NASA, claimed that what was going on within the Sun was absolutely incredible. She also said that she was not “allowed” to talk about it. But she talked anyway, because she felt that the world needed to know, but at the same time she asked that I not publicly discuss what she had said. Sort of a Catch-22. So the photo at left is just a hint (click on it for a larger view). It’s a recent picture of the Sun from, I believe, the year 2000, showing multiple sunspots ringing the sun on the two latitudes of 19.48 north and south. Some of you will see the significance of this much energy’s being emitted at this particular location.

So let’s look at the obvious question: Read more…

Flooding, Avalanche Threat Continues Across Northwest

January 17, 2011 1 comment

Drenching rainfall from the latest in a series of storms will continue to cause flooding across parts of the Pacific Northwest today.

Another 1 to 3 inches of rain will fall today along the Pacific coast and in the valleys of western Washington and Oregon, including Seattle and Portland. Heavy rain will also douse areas well to the east of the Cascades, across parts of western Washington and Oregon, as well as parts of Idaho.

The rain will fall heaviest during the morning hours before becoming more showery-in-nature by tonight.

Regardless of intensity, any additional rainfall will only exasperate ongoing flooding, which could make for slow travel along the I-5 corridor south to Medford. Motorists should always avoid driving through areas where water is ponding.

Higher rainfall totals are likely in the upslope areas of the Cascades. River flooding is already ongoing along rivers flowing off the mountains, including the Cowlitz, Nisqually and Puyallup Rivers. Read more…

It Really Is a Small World

January 17, 2011 3 comments

There is a flood in Australia of biblical proportions though it must be said there is little news of it in the U.S. media. Much of Queensland is under water which would be comparable to saying that much of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and a large portion of New York is under water. Australia is very big.

If that news was not disturbing enough, on Tuesday, Krakatau volcano in Indonesia erupted, forcing the evacuation of tens of thousands in its vicinity as ash rained down on two large provinces. Meanwhile, the Kizimen volcano on Kamchatka is erupting as well.

England is passing through the worst winter in the last hundred years of recorded history. Its heavy investment in clean energy, specifically wind turbines, has turned out to be a bad idea since they tend not to turn much when the weather turns cold. Having shut down most of its coal mines, England is experiencing a lack of electrical power that is killing some folks.

No, it is not the Apocalypse, but it might as well be for people fleeing or trapped by these huge events.

No doubt some people are trying to organize efforts to save the kangaroos and koala bears in Australia while others are worrying about indigenous animals in Indonesia. If this sounds like they have idiotic priorities, they do. The same indifference Nature shows to these critters applies to you as well.

The anniversary of the Haiti earthquake, January 13, will occasion a flurry of articles and analysis of what has happened since (not much) but will fade by the weekend. Haiti hasn’t had a good day for centuries.

Meanwhile, snow has fallen in 49 of the U.S. States including Hawaii! It covered 69% of the lower 48. The northeast just experienced its second blizzard since Christmas.

Time to panic? Hardly.

So when should we panic? I would suggest a good time would be when we in America wake up and discover that the current administration has forced enough coal-burning utilities to shut down and there’s no electricity or just not enough to go around. Coal provides fifty percent of all of the electricity we use in the U.S.

We might begin to panic when we realize that the government remains steadfastly in the way of building more nuclear plants to generate electricity, despite its rhetoric stating the opposite.

Most Americans will begin to get angry when a gallon of gasoline hits $4 or more and will wonder why without wondering what happens when the U.S. government shuts down much of the drilling in the Gulf of Mexico by simply not issuing permits and forbids exploration or drilling off the long East and West coasts where billions of barrels of oil are believed to exist. Brazil is doing it. Why not us?

Oil is a global commodity which means that its price is determined by supply and demand. Right now, as China’s economy continues to surge and ours continues to stagnate, China is buying up as much oil as it can get its hands on. It is drilling for it off the coast of Cuba, a mere 90 miles from the tip of Florida.

Due to the floods in Australia, a major producer of coal, China is looking to purchase coal dug out of the mines in Appalachia, precisely where the Obama administration has done its best to shut down mines.

So, you see, it really is a small world after all.

The last great eruption of Krakatau actually lowered the temperature worldwide by throwing so much “schmutz” into the atmosphere it interfered with the Sun’s warming rays.

No matter where you live, it helps if the government doesn’t behave in a totally irrational and stupid way in the name of some bogus notion like global warming.

By the way, where is Al Gore these days? I hear China is experiencing some monster snow storms and it wouldn’t surprise me to hear he’s over there.

© Alan Caruba,

Year of Extremes, Strongest La Nina: What It Means for Coming Months

January 17, 2011 Comments off

2010 was a year of extreme weather events with epic flooding, snowstorms, drought, heat waves and severe cold unfolding across the U.S. and the globe. It tied 2005 as the warmest year on record, and was also a year in which one of the strongest December La Niñas in recorded history was observed.

La Niñas, which occur when sea surface temperatures across the equatorial central and eastern Pacific Ocean are below normal, play a significant role in the overall weather pattern across the globe. The current La Niña has been influential in 2010’s extreme events. Details on those events and their connection to La Niña can be found in this AccuWeather.com news story.

While some of the extremes have fallen in line with overall weather conditions typically expected during a La Niña, other events have been the complete opposite. Disastrous flooding in Southern California during December and recent extreme cold, snow and ice in the Southeast are examples of events in contrast with what is typically expected during Read more…