Archive

Posts Tagged ‘DARPA’

Next in ID Verification: Behavioral Biometrics

February 19, 2015 Comments off

pymnts.com

shutterstock_4104976

The current height in identity verification on the Web is passwords, fingerprints and iris recognition. But the process may move out of the realm of the physical altogether.

The U.S. military is developing a new “cognitive” identity verification system at West Point that could ultimately replace passwords, fingerprints and iris recognition systems for Web users. The system uses “cognitive fingerprints” instead of physical characteristics such as palms, face, DNA or iris recognition.

The biometric API centers on behavioral-based biometrics in which algorithms are used to confirm identity based on the way an individual uses desktop or mobile devices. This can include observing the rhythm of

Read more…

Advertisements

Pentagon Now Sees Big Data As “National Security Threat”

August 13, 2013 Comments off

The data divers at the Defense Department know better than most how to how to track down someone just by looking at his phone records. Now they want to know if America’s enemies could cause a fiscal meltdown or a massive cyber attack by combing through Netflix queues, Uber accounts, and Twitter feeds.

The doomsday thinkers over at DARPA are looking for researchers to “investigate the national security threat posed by public data available either for purchase or through open sources.” The question is, could a determined data-miner use only publicly available information–culled from Web pages and social media or from a consumer data broker–to cause “nation-state type effects.” Forget identify theft. DARPA appears to be talking about Read more…

U.S. government spending on big data to grow exponentially

August 10, 2013 Comments off

biometricupdate.com

 

 

August 9, 2013 –

 

Biometrics Research Group, Inc. has observed that national security and military applications are driving a large proportion of “Big Data” research spending.

 

Big Data is a term used to describe large and complex data sets that can provide insightful conclusions when analyzed and visualized in a meaningful way. Conventional database tools do not have capabilities to manage large volumes of unstructured data.  The U.S. Government is therefore investing in programs to develop new tools and technologies to manage highly complex data.  The basic components of Big Data include hardware, software, services and storage.

 

Biometrics Research Group estimates that federal agencies spent approximately US$5 billion on Big Data resources in the 2012 fiscal year. We estimate that annual spending will grow to Read more…

Ready for World War III with China?

August 7, 2013 Comments off

batr.org

“U.S. policy must create a climate in which a rising China is never tempted to use its growing power coercively within or outside the region.”  – Richard Haas, chairman of the U.S. Council on Foreign Relations

 china-president-hu-says-prepare-navy-for-war.jpg

Ready for World War III with China?

With the constant drumbeat that Armageddon is imminent, it is easy to dismiss the geopolitical threats that pose a realpolitik danger. The prospects that definite weapons of mass destruction will engulf the planet in a nuclear winter are upon us once again. After the collapse of the Soviet evil empire, the Reagan – Gorbachev détente provided the world with one of its last hopes for restoring rational international relations. Regretfully, the last superpower used the defeat of the Marxist model of tyranny to impose their Pax American version of a global New World Order. The military machine of NATO, furnished with DARPA technology, would implement the Read more…

Next Up for Big Brother: Recording and Transcribing Public Conversations

March 6, 2013 1 comment

allgov.com

Matt Lease, a computer scientist at the University of Texas, is working on ways to literally record all human conversations no matter where they take place. But his research is being funded by the Department of Defense, raising the question of how such a technology might be used in the hands of the government.

 

Lease’s plan is to utilize crowdsourcing, voice recognition software and everyday devices like smartphones to gather human speech, whether in a business meeting or on the street, and store it somewhere so people could access what they said anytime.

 

He told Wired’s Danger Room that he saw the work as both a “need and opportunity to really make conversational speech more accessible, more part of our permanent record instead of being so ephemeral, and really trying to imagine what this world would look like if we really could capture all these conversations and make use of them effectively going forward.”

 

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) liked Lease’s idea so much it gave him a $300,000 grant to support his efforts.

 

If successful, this new system could raise “some thorny legal and social questions about privacy,” wrote Robert Beckhusen at Wired.

 

One example cited by Lease involves “respecting the privacy rights of multiple people involved,” and how to gain permission of everyone talking before capturing and storing a conversation. In the hands of spy agencies, this is not expected to be an issue.

-Noel Brinkerhoff

11 Body Parts Defense Researchers Will Use to Track You

January 29, 2013 Comments off

wired.com

The Ear

Cell phones that can identify you by how you walk. Fingerprint scanners that work from 25 feet away. Radars that pick up your heartbeat from behind concrete walls. Algorithms that can tell identical twins apart. Eyebrows and earlobes that give you away. A new generation of technologies is emerging that can identify you by your physiology. And unlike the old crop of biometric systems, you don’t need to be right up close to the scanner in order to be identified. If they work as advertised, they may be able to identify you without you ever knowing you’ve been spotted.

Biometrics had a boom after 9/11. Gobs of government money poured into face and iris recognition systems; the Pentagon alone spent nearly $3 billion in five years, and the Defense Department was only one of many federal agencies funneling cash in the technologies. Civil libertarians feared the Read more…

This Is Not A Mosquito It’s An Insect Spy Drone For Urban Areas Already In Production Funded By The Gov (VIDEO)

January 23, 2013 Comments off

pakalertpress.com

It’s an insect spy drone for urban areas, already in production, funded by the Government. It can be remotely controlled and is equipped with a camera and a microphone. It can land on you, and it may have the potential to take a DNA sample or leave RFID tracking nanotechnology on your skin.

This Is Not A Mosquito It’s An Insect Spy Drone For Urban Areas Already In Production Funded By The Gov

It can fly through an open window, or it can attach to your clothing until you take it in your home.

And for all you who automatically say “fake” because you don’t think the government is funding this… do some research.

Source: http://is.gd/Uy5DJT
Research paper: http://is.gd/1UcubI
Footage: http://is.gd/wYN00X
Knowledge of Today

Read more…