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Posts Tagged ‘face recognition’

Pentagon Inks Deal for Smartphone Tool That Scans Your Face, Eyes, Thumbs

February 13, 2013 Comments off

wired.com

California-based AOptix landed a deal with the Defense Department for its biometrics identification system that loads onto a smartphone (shown here as a hardware mock-up). Photo: AOptix

In a few years, the soldier, marine or special operator out on patrol might be able to record the facial features or iris signature of a suspicious person all from his or her smartphone — and at a distance, too.

The Defense Department has awarded a $3 million research contract to California-based AOptix to examine its “Smart Mobile Identity” biometrics identification package, Danger Room has learned. At the end of two years of research to validate the concepts of what the company built, AOptix will provide the Defense Department with a hardware peripheral and software suite that turns a commercially available smartphone into a device that Read more…

11 Body Parts Defense Researchers Will Use to Track You

January 29, 2013 Comments off

wired.com

The Ear

Cell phones that can identify you by how you walk. Fingerprint scanners that work from 25 feet away. Radars that pick up your heartbeat from behind concrete walls. Algorithms that can tell identical twins apart. Eyebrows and earlobes that give you away. A new generation of technologies is emerging that can identify you by your physiology. And unlike the old crop of biometric systems, you don’t need to be right up close to the scanner in order to be identified. If they work as advertised, they may be able to identify you without you ever knowing you’ve been spotted.

Biometrics had a boom after 9/11. Gobs of government money poured into face and iris recognition systems; the Pentagon alone spent nearly $3 billion in five years, and the Defense Department was only one of many federal agencies funneling cash in the technologies. Civil libertarians feared the Read more…

Ecuador Implements “World’s First” Countrywide Facial- and Voice-Recognition System

December 12, 2012 Comments off

slate.com

Rafael Correa, the president of Ecuador

Photo by ERNESTO BENAVIDES/AFP/Getty Images

The United States is often considered a world leader when it comes to deploying the latest biometric security and surveillance technologies. But it could have an unlikely new competitor: Ecuador.

According to Russian company the Speech Technology Center, the small Latin American country has successfully completed installation of “the world’s first biometric identification platform, at a nation-wide level, that combines voice and face identification capabilities.”

As I reported back in September, Speech Technology Center operates under the name SpeechPro in the United States. The company’s controversial technology enables authorities to build a massive database containing several million “voiceprints” of known criminals, suspects, or persons of interest. When authorities want to ID speakers on an intercepted Read more…

FBI launches $1 billion nationwide facial recognition system

September 7, 2012 1 comment

extremetech

Facial recognition

The US Federal Bureau of Investigation has begun rolling out its new $1 billion biometric Next Generation Identification (NGI) system. In essence, NGI is a nationwide database of mugshots, iris scans, DNA records, voice samples, and other biometrics, that will help the FBI identify and catch criminals — but it is how this biometric data is captured, through a nationwide network of cameras and photo databases, that is raising the eyebrows of privacy advocates.

Until now, the FBI relied on IAFIS, a national fingerprint database that has long been due an overhaul. Over the last few months, the FBI has been pilot testing a facial recognition system — and soon, detectives will also be able to search the system for other biometrics such as DNA records and iris scans. In theory, this should result in much faster positive identifications of criminals and fewer unsolved cases.

According to New Scientist, facial recognition systems have reached the point where they can Read more…

Biometrics: Those Tell-Tale Signs That Say Who You Are

April 24, 2012 Comments off

sciencedaily.com

ScienceDaily (Apr. 23, 2012) — Forget about fingerprints or iris recognition; the way you walk or move your hands, even your pulse, can be analysed for unique characteristics. EU-funded researchers are looking at ways this new technology could protect your security and make identity checking less obtrusive and more accurate.

You might think that PIN codes and fingerprints are pretty secure identity systems, but they are in fact simple to hack. The criminal community has found it too easy to steal PIN numbers just using cameras, card copiers or the point of a knife at the cash point. And James Bond famously tricked an adversary to believing his false identity by wearing ‘fake fingerprints’.

The use of biometric identification — using the unique properties and characteristics of an individual to help identify them — continues to grow in popularity. Modern electronic passport checks use face recognition, and iris scanning has also been tested in some airports.

Recognising the growing market fo Read more…

Robocop becomes reality with Spain’s Ex-Sight

April 17, 2012 Comments off

smartplanet.com


ALICANTE–The cyborg facial recognition of Robocop becomes a reality as Spain’s Ex-Sight technology equips police officers with the ability to scan 100,000 faces per second. They can then cross these images with whose in a database and, in moments, identify suspects.

The first widespread implementation of this technology is with the Brazilian police getting ready for the next World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics. ”The military police have a database of suspicious people they connect with our software, and our software runs inside the control center in every stadium,” says Elazar Lozano Vidal, of Ex-Sight Spain. There are cameras at each entrance of the sports stadiums. “The police have also cameras in the glasses, one of the lens is a screen and (the other) has a camera in the glass.”

Lozano says these Ex-Eye facial recognition glasses are used to scan every person that goes in front of these cameras, up to 100,000 faces a second, and that one well-situated police officer is enough to detect a crowd on a street.

The officer “moves his face and with the glasses detects a lot of people, and Read more…

Japanese surveillance system scans 36 million faces in seconds (VIDEO)

March 23, 2012 Comments off

itworld.com

March 22, 2012, 1:52 PM — Interesting stuff out of Japan – DigInfo has a video showing a new system created by Hitachi Kokusai Electric that can scan more than 36 million faces based on surveillance footage or regular photos in about a second. The high speed is “achieved by detecting faces through image recognition when the footage from the camera is recorded, and also by grouping similar faces,” a spokesman says.

It’s unclear whether this achieves the level of tech on the old “24” TV show, where Jack Bauer could identify people on surveillance footage in a matter of seconds, but it’s still an interesting scenario for large-scale security setups.