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Posts Tagged ‘Iris recognition’

11 Body Parts Defense Researchers Will Use to Track You

January 29, 2013 Comments off

wired.com

The Ear

Cell phones that can identify you by how you walk. Fingerprint scanners that work from 25 feet away. Radars that pick up your heartbeat from behind concrete walls. Algorithms that can tell identical twins apart. Eyebrows and earlobes that give you away. A new generation of technologies is emerging that can identify you by your physiology. And unlike the old crop of biometric systems, you don’t need to be right up close to the scanner in order to be identified. If they work as advertised, they may be able to identify you without you ever knowing you’ve been spotted.

Biometrics had a boom after 9/11. Gobs of government money poured into face and iris recognition systems; the Pentagon alone spent nearly $3 billion in five years, and the Defense Department was only one of many federal agencies funneling cash in the technologies. Civil libertarians feared the Read more…

5 Creepy New Ways for Police to Intrude on Your Rights

January 17, 2013 Comments off

alternet.org

Handcuffs that give shocks? Mobile iris scan readers? Thanks to Homeland Security cash, police departments are stocking up on all kinds of creepy new technologies.
January 14, 2013  |
 One of the most disturbing trends in law enforcement in recent years is the hyper-paramilitarization of local police forces. Much of the funding for tanks for Fargo’s hometown cop shop comes from the Department of Homeland Security. The feds have a lot of money to throw around in the name of preventing terrorism, and municipalities want to get that money. As anyone who has done budgeting knows, the best way to ensure your funding stays high is to request a lot of money and spend it all.

As a result, every year the police get more tools, gadgets, weapons, and surveillance technologies that, whatever their stated purpose, serve to give cops greater capabilities to curtail the rights of anyone unlucky enough to be standing in their path.

We were going to list these in order from least to most creepy, but that proved far too challenging. So here are some cop tools you may not be familiar with, in no particular order.

1. Shock-cuffs.These made a splash in late 2012 when it was reported that Scottsdale Inventions had submitted a patent for metal handcuffs capable of Read more…

Biometrics: Those Tell-Tale Signs That Say Who You Are

April 24, 2012 Comments off

sciencedaily.com

ScienceDaily (Apr. 23, 2012) — Forget about fingerprints or iris recognition; the way you walk or move your hands, even your pulse, can be analysed for unique characteristics. EU-funded researchers are looking at ways this new technology could protect your security and make identity checking less obtrusive and more accurate.

You might think that PIN codes and fingerprints are pretty secure identity systems, but they are in fact simple to hack. The criminal community has found it too easy to steal PIN numbers just using cameras, card copiers or the point of a knife at the cash point. And James Bond famously tricked an adversary to believing his false identity by wearing ‘fake fingerprints’.

The use of biometric identification — using the unique properties and characteristics of an individual to help identify them — continues to grow in popularity. Modern electronic passport checks use face recognition, and iris scanning has also been tested in some airports.

Recognising the growing market fo Read more…

NYPD Forces Retina Scan on Occupy Wall Street Activists

March 22, 2012 Comments off

popdecay

It remains unclear whether there is compelling state interest in forcing retina scans on peaceful protesters exercising their right to free speech in a public place, but that’s just what the New York Police Department is doing to the Occupy Wall Street activists.

Over 90 Occupy Wall Street protesters were arrested Saturday afternoon, and some were arraigned yesterday in Manhattan Criminal Court, but not before learning that the cost of their bail would spike exponentially — or that the opportunity to post bail would be denied arbitrarily – if protesters did not submit to retina scans.

Activists and lawyers alike were surprised yesterday to learn that Read more…

Biometric Identification Will Replace Many Passwords In Next Five Years, Says IBM Scientist

January 5, 2012 1 comment

huffingtonpost

Passwords have been around since ancient history, but they may become obsolete sooner than you think. According to a recent prediction by IBM Speech CTO David Nahamoo, many of the problems with passwords will be solved by biometric systems that can identify individuals based on unique biological features.

It’s not just fingerprints, DNA and retinas anymore; the way you walk is unique and so is the way you type, for example. Orwell references may be inevitable, but the technology can be used for good as well, aiding in various interactive systems, from video games to cars to iPads, and otherwise making it easier to prove that you’re you.

For a long time, it was hard to use biometrics quickly and accurately in our daily lives, but the combination of various identifiers may make the systems convenient enough for widespread use. A recent column in InformationWeek points to the United States Visitor And Information Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) as a prime example of a system that’s been able to scale: “The enrollment and validation of these attributes is fast and accurate enough for use in everyday, large-scale deployments, and the Department of Homeland Security just announced it will pay Accenture Federal Services $71 million over 13 months to further improve the system.”

There’s also India’s massive biometric census project, which is Read more…

Mexico to pioneer iris technology on ID cards

January 25, 2011 Comments off

Its only a matter of time until the U.S. moves to this widespread technology.

Mexico will on Monday become the first country to start using iris scans for identity cards, according to the government, which claims the scheme will be highly secure.

“The legal, technical and financial conditions are ready to start the process of issuing this identity document,Felipe Zamora, responsible for legal affairs at the Mexican Interior Ministry, told journalists Thursday.

The documents, which will include the eye’s image as well as fingerprints, a photo and signature, will be 99 percent reliable, Zamora said.

Critics, including the National Human Rights Commission, have slammed the system, expressing concern that compiling personal data could violate individual rights.

The move will be introduced gradually, with some 28 million minors taking part in a first two-year stage, due to cost 25 million dollars.

The cards are due to start for adults from 2013.

Iris recognition is increasingly used in airports, controlling access to restricted areas, and prisoner booking and release.