Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Darwin gap’

Stress of Sliding Plates Builds Near Chile

February 9, 2011 Comments off
 

Rafael Vallejos/European Pressphoto Agency

NEAR EPICENTER Concepción, Chile’s second-largest metropolitan area, was badly damaged in last February’s quake.

By HENRY FOUNTAIN

When a magnitude-8.8 earthquake struck off the coast of Chile last February, geophysicists and seismologists were not surprised. The quake’s epicenter was on a roughly 200-mile stretch of a fault where stresses had been building for nearly two centuries, and experts had expected that one day the strain would be relieved in a cataclysmic event.

But as scientists have pored over volumes of data from what may turn out to be the best-studied major earthquake yet, they have concluded that Read more…

Scientists warn of new Chilean quake

February 1, 2011 Comments off

Rescue workers search for victims and survivors after an apartment complex collapsed during an 8.8-magnitude earthquake in Concepcion on February 27, 2010. Scientists say there is a high risk of a new earthquake in an area of Chile's Pacific coast which was hit by a massive quake and tsunamis last year.

Nearly 500 people were killed when an 8.8-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of central Chile triggering a local tsunami in February 2010.

According to the report published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the previous quake had only partly broken stresses, deep in the Earth’s crust in the Chilean city of Concepcion, that have been building up since an 1835 quake witnessed by British naturalist Charles Darwin.

Darwin documented the 1835 earthquake during a five-year voyage.

“We conclude that increased stress on the unbroken patch may in turn have increased the probability of another major to great earthquake there in the near future,” the report read.

Chile’s February quake was the most powerful since the one in 2004 which caused a devastating tsunami in the Indian Ocean.

“It’s impossible to predict exactly when a new quake might happen,” Stefano Lorito of Italy’s Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia told Reuters.

Scientists examined data from tsunamis, satellites and other sources to calculate the Read more…