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Posts Tagged ‘south america’

Tectonic Plates moving Again: Will South America split away from Central America?

March 6, 2013 Comments off

destination-yisrael.biblesearchers.com

Earthquakes South AmericaEarthquakes heralding the Collapsing of the Nazca and the Cocos Plates along the Western Coastline of South America

One of the expectations of Earth Change researchers is that with the evidence of the folding of the tectonic plates under the Pacific Ocean and the collapsing or subduction of the Western Regions of the Ring of fire in the Far East, that these collapsing plates will eventually pull the Northern Regions of South America to the west into the Pacific Ocean and tear away South America from Central America.

Recently it was noticed that the buoys along the Cocos and the Nazca Plates were deactivated. At the same time the earthquakes along the eastern regions of those same plates that were jutting up against South America along the Andes, from the tip of South America upwards to Peru were increasing exponentially. 

As the South American coastline is being pulled over the Nazca Plate, what has been called the “South American Roll” has been activating earthquakes that would have been noticed by the buoys rising or collapsing with the rolling earthquakes are now silent. It would be expected that the officials in charge of the buoys deployment and activation would hesitate to let the southern Read more…

Unprecedented glacier melting in the Andes blamed on climate change

January 22, 2013 Comments off

phys.org

pastorurimelt.jpgGlaciers in the tropical Andes have been retreating at increasing rate since the 1970s, scientists write in the most comprehensive review to date of Andean glacier observations. The researchers blame the melting on rising temperatures as the region has warmed about 0.7°C over the past 50 years (1950-1994). This unprecedented retreat could affect water supply to Andean populations in the near future. These conclusions are published today in The Cryosphere, an Open Access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

The international team of scientists – uniting researchers from Europe, South America and the US – shows in the new paper that, since the 1970s, glaciers in tropical Andes have been melting at a rate unprecedented in the past 300 years. Globally, glaciers have been retreating at a moderate pace as the planet warmed after the peak of the Little Ice Age, a cold period lasting from the 16th to the mid-19th century. Over the past few decades, however, the rate of melting has increased steeply in the tropical Andes. Glaciers in the mountain range have shrunk by an average of 30-50% since the 1970s, according Read more…

Iran’s Ahmadinejad touring Latin American countries

January 11, 2012 Comments off

examiner.com

Ahmadinejad is thumbing his nose at the US by courting regimes in South America that share his hatred for the United States. Credit: NewswithViews

Iran’s Foreign Minister Ali-Akbar Salehi announced during the weekend that Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad began his low-key tour of Latin American countries, according to a report obtained by the Terrorism Committee of the National Association of Chiefs of Police.

FM Salehi stated that the planned Latin American tour will take the Ahmadinejad to Venezuela, Nicaragua, Cuba and Ecuador, all nations run by left-wing governments hostile to the United States.

According to several intelligence reports from U.S. agencies and the U.S. Congress, Venezuela is home to a number of Iranian intelligence and military officers, as well as members of the Lebanon-based terrorist group Hezbollah, which is supported by the Iranian regime.

During his tour, the President Ahmadinejad is expected to Read more…

Brazil to build nuclear submarines which will dramatically alter balance of power in South America

July 18, 2011 Comments off

dailymail

Sub: Brazil plans to build its first nuclear submarine in the next few yearsThe Brazilian government has started work on a submarine programme which will include the construction of South America’s first nuclear subs.

The move will boost Brazil’s claim to be the strongest force in the region, and strengthen the country’s military assertiveness.

This new-found power may harm Britain in the event of another flare-up over the Falklands, according to U.S. news agency Global Post, as Brazil thinks the islands should belong to Argentina.

The defence plan was announced in 2008, and will eventually involve the construction of five new submarines. Each will cost around $565 million.

The first, being built in collaboration with a French contractor, is due to come into service in 2016.

By the time the programme is complete, Brazil will Read more…

Heart Disease And Stroke Worldwide Tied To National Income

July 8, 2011 1 comment

nanopatentsandinnovations

An analysis of heart disease and stroke statistics collected in 192 countries by the World Health Organization (WHO) shows that the relative burden of the two diseases varies widely from country to country and is closely linked to national income, according to researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Reporting this week in the journal Circulation, the UCSF scientists found that developing countries tend to suffer more death and disability by stroke than heart disease – opposite the situation in the United States and other countries with higher national incomes.

This map shows the burden of disease from stroke and/or ischemic heart disease. Click to enlarge.
Credit: University of California – San Francisco

This observation may help health officials design interventions that best fit the needs of Read more…

32 Inches Of Snow Falls In Driest Place On Earth!

July 8, 2011 Comments off

www.sott.net

Emergency services were forced to rescue stranded motorists following heavy snowfall

One of the driest spots on earth has experienced its heaviest snowfall in almost two decades, according to the Chilean Directorate of Meteorology (DMC).

A cold front brought up to 80 centimetres (31.5 inches) of snow to the Atacama desert region of South America forcing emergency services to close local roads and rescue dozens of motorists from their vehicles. The temperature in the Chilean capital, Santiago, dropped below minus 8c on Wednesday. Neighbouring Argentina and Uruguay are also experiencing subzero temperatures.

Located in the north of Chile, the Atacama Desert records less than 50mm of rain on average each year. Some weather stations in the region record only 1-3mm of rain each year. The desert is, according to NASA, National Geographic and many other publications, the driest desert in the world, due to the Read more…

Dead Penguins Washing Ashore With Disturbing Regularity

June 30, 2011 Comments off

treehugger

penguin dead on beach photo Photo: elisfanclub / cc

Last week, several dozen dead and dying Magellanic penguins were discovered on beaches throughout south Brazil, apparent victims of an oil spill. So far more than 140 penguins have been transfered to animal care facilities to be cleaned and rehabilitated, while an untold number more have already perished from contaminated waters. If this fact alone weren’t cause enough for concern, what’s more troubling is that it’s hardly an isolated incident. For the last ten years, with disturbing regularity, penguins have been washing ashore starving or covered in oil. And while the origins of these annual mass deaths remain officially a mystery — one biologists believes Read more…