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Posts Tagged ‘eruption’

Something Strange With Volcano Eruption in Chile

June 6, 2011 Comments off

modernsurvivalblog

puyehue-volcano-eruption-plume

What appears to be an enormous ash cloud rising from the eruption of a long dormant volcano named Puyehue in southern Chile on June 4, 2011, isn’t quite matching up with the location of the recorded earthquakes today in the immediate area.

“The Cordon Caulle (volcanic range) has entered an eruptive process, with an explosion resulting in a 10-kilometer-high gas column,” Chilean state emergency office said.

The thing is, for some unknown reason, as of this writing, eight earthquakes near magnitude 5 have shook the earth near the Puyehue volcano. The problem is, the earthquakes are located 20 to 40 miles away from the eruption! Very Strange Indeed. (Strange because one would think that Read more…

Flights out of Scotland cancelled as ash cloud from Iceland volcano ‘will drift over UK within hours’

May 23, 2011 Comments off

dailymail

A Scottish airline has cancelled 36 flights tomorrow as the ash cloud billowing from a volanco in Iceland approaches UK airspace.

Regional carrier Loganair, which flies out of Glasgow, announced that there would be no flights following a Civil Aviation Authority warning that disruption could not be ruled out.

The Met Office is predicting the plume of ash from the Grimsvotn volcano will begin to drift over parts of Scotland in the next few hours and would cover all of Ireland, Scotland and parts of northern Britain by 6am tomorrow.

Asked whether this would cause some disruption to flights, a CAA spokesman said: ‘That’s the way it’s looking certainly at the moment.’

William Hague, however, has said he does not predict the volcano will not cause the chaos seen a year ago. The Foreign Secretary has said that Britain has more information on how ash clouds move and is less likely to have to enforce a blanket flight ban.

Last April airports across the UK were shut down for five days. With school half-term holidays next week any disruption to UK airports would cause chaos for hundreds of thousands of families.

Mathematical Model shows Volcanoes Re-awaken in Mere Months

March 10, 2011 Comments off

scientificcomputing.com

Mathematical Model shows Volcanoes Re-awaken in Mere Months

Until now, it was thought that, once a volcano’s magma chamber had cooled down, it remained dormant for centuries before it could be remobilized by fresh magma. A theoretical model developed by Alain Burgisser of the Orléans Institute of Earth Sciences (Institut des Sciences de la Terre d’Orléans – CNRS/Universités d’Orléans et de Tours) together with a U.S. researcher, was tested on two major eruptions and completely overturned this hypothesis: the reawakening of a chamber could take place in just a few months. This research should lead to a reassessment of the dangerousness of some dormant volcanoes. It is published in the journal Nature dated March, 3 2011.

A magma chamber is a large reservoir of molten rock (magma) located several kilometers beneath a volcano, which it feeds with magma. But what happens to the magma chamber when the volcano is not erupting? According to volcanologists, it cools down to an extremely viscous mush until fresh magma from deep inside the Earth ‘reawakens’ it — in other words, fluidizes it by heating it through thermal contact. The large size of magma chambers (ranging from a few tenths to a few hundred cubic kilometers) explains why, according to this theory, it takes several hundred or even thousand years for the heat to spread to the whole reservoir, awakening the volcano from its dormant state.

However, according to the mathematical model developed by Burgisser and his U.S. colleague, George Bergantz, of the Earth and Space Science Department, Seattle, reheating takes place in three stages. When fresh hot Read more…

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Iceland hit by 400 earthquakes in 24 hour, Krisuvik volcano show activity

February 28, 2011 Comments off

thewatchers

After four days of continues earthquake activity it appears that Krísuvík volcano has stepped up it’s activity by a order of magnitude. Since midnight there have been over 400 earthquakes in Krísuvík volcano. The activity is continuing when this is written and does not show any signs of slowing down at this moment. Geologist in Iceland are expecting more earthquakes in this area over the next hours and even earthquakes that are larger then ML3.0 in size.

Earthquake location 27 Feb 15:40 GMT 

The largest earthquakes where ML3.3 and ML3.7 in size. This is automatic size by the SIL system. The depth of the earthquakes was 4.7 km and 1.1 km according to the automatic SIL system. Due to high number of earthquakes the SIL system is putting earthquakes down all around the Reykjanes Peninsula. While there might be some earthquakes there, the number is not nearly as high as can be seen on the map. The earthquakes can be located by there low quality number.

Given the location and how this earthquake swarm is behaving by opinion of  jonfr.com (Iceland volcano and earthquake blog) that this is due to a magma is pushing up the crust in this area. It remains a question of this is going to start a eruption or not. But the chances are growing for as long as this earthquake pattern holds up in Krísuvík volcano. If a eruption starts in Krísuvík volcano it is going to one of Hawaii type eruption, unless it is Read more…

4.3-magnitude earthquake near Mount St. Helens is biggest in 30 years

February 16, 2011 Comments off

By Stuart Tomlinson, The Oregonian

sthelenssunset.JPG

Fault line, won’t you be my Valentine?

The second largest earthquake since Mount St. Helens erupted — a magnitude 4.3 shaker — rocked a fault line six miles north of the volcano Monday morning. People felt it as far away as Astoria, Lake Oswego, Hood River and even Bremerton, Wash., near Seattle.

The last one, as it happens, was 30 years ago also on Valentine’s Day, a magnitude 5.5 temblor.

That 1981 earthquake appeared to be the result of the earth’s crust readjusting after magma oozed up through the fault and blew the mountain’s Read more…

Japan volcano erupts again with massive blast of gas, ash and rocks

February 2, 2011 Comments off
Dome of lava is seen at a eruptive crater at Shinmoedake peak between Miyazaki and Kagoshima prefectures January 31, 2011. More than 1,000 people in southern Japan have been urged to evacuate as a volcano picked up its activities, spewing ashes and small rocks into air and disrupting airline operations, a municipal official said on Monday. (Xinhua/Reuters Photo)

TOKYO, Feb. 1 (Xinhua) — A volcano located on a mountain range on the island of Kyushu, southwest Japan, erupted for the second time Tuesday in an explosion local officials said was five times bigger than the one last Wednesday.

The eruption sent an enormous plume of gas, ash and rocks shooting as high as 2,000 meters into the air and the blast smashed windows in hotels and offices as far away as eight kilometers, local reports said.

As yet no deaths have been reported as a result of the eruption, although one women was cut by shattered glass and felled trees caused by the blast have been hindering traffic in the region, local officials said.

Following the latest blast, the Japan Meteorological Agency raised the alert level from Read more…

Eruption Of Colima Volcano

January 29, 2011 Comments off


A light colored plume, probably the result of rockfall on the dome, extends to the east (right) of the summit. The summit crater is the remnant of an explosive eruption in 1913 which knocked 100 meters (300 feet) off the top of the mountain. For a larger version of this image please go here. by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Jan 28, 2011
Colima Volcano, Mexico’s most active, has been erupting since 1998. The eruption began with several months of earthquakes beneath the volcano, followed by explosions and rockfalls at the summit lava dome as it began to grow.

Dome growth was accompanied months later by a series of lava flows which cascaded down the southwestern flank of the mountain, stretching up to 3,100 meters (10,000 feet) from the summit.

Since then dome growth has continued, with a few periods of actively flowing lava. As of March 2010, the dome was growing about 2,000 cubic meters (70,000) cubic feet a day, leading to frequent small rockfalls and occasional ash plumes. In January 2011, local newspapers reported “dust plumes” rising over Colima, likely pulverized lava stirred up by landslides at the summit dome. Read more…