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Archive for the ‘Biotechnology’ Category

Would You Eat A Tomato Which Contains A Gene From A Fish Or A Potato with DNA From An Insect? You May Be Suprised To Learn That You May Already Have.

September 6, 2011 2 comments

endthelie


By David Noble

While we are constantly being reassured that GMO is not only safe but every bit as good for us as organic there is overwhelming evidence that tells us otherwise. Biotech companies like Monsanto are using superficial, rigged research which is designed to avoid finding problems to try and convince us that GMOs are safe. The Main stream media are also guilty of trying to promote GMO as a safe cheaper alternative to organic by citing inaccurate studies which do not address the health concerns or the damage GMO does to the environment.

If people were told the truth about the food they are buying I am sure most would choose organic. Lets face it, if you were given the choice of buying some nice fresh organic tomatoes or potatoes grown as nature intended or take a chance on tomatoes that may contain a gene from a fish or how about potatoes with DNA from an insect which would you choose? While the Read more…

Electronic skin tattoo has medical, gaming, spy uses-Mark of the Beast?

August 12, 2011 Comments off

A hair-thin electronic patch that adheres to the skin like a temporary tattoo could transform medical sensing, computer gamingand even spy operations, according to a US study published Thursday.

The micro-electronics technology, called an epidermal electronic system (EES), was developed by an international team of researchers from the United States, China and Singapore, and is described in the journal Science.

“It’s a technology that blurs the distinction between Read more…

GM Human-Animal Hybrids Emerging Market for Organs, Babies, Pharma

July 27, 2011 1 comment

infowars

TheFrontlineReports
Infowars.com
July 27, 2011

Scientists have hoped for decades that developments in genetic research could lead to biotech applications. Now, human-animal hybrids and transgenic clones are paving the way for organ harvesting and artificially-created human life. But what are the ethics behind this new technology? A biotech culture of ‘pharming’ has also emerged where cloned animals with inserted cross-species genes are used to produce everything from a GMO-version of human-like bovine milk, to pharmaceutical drugs, to spider-silk bred in goats and glow-in-the-dark puppies, kittens and mice made translucent by the application of jellyfish genes.

Read more…

Nanobots To Swim In Blood Stream To Make Repairs, Rare Earth Replacements Found

July 14, 2011 2 comments

beforeitsnews

Nanoscale robots that can flow through blood or repair complex electronics may yet be a possibility with the help of a new strategy developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Although devices such as computer processors can effectively handle electrical signals at the length scale of 10 nanometers, achieving motion at the nanoscale has remained elusive.

“If we want to conquer the nanoscale, we need efficient ways to convert electrical signals to mechanical signals on comparable Read more…

Efficient DNA-Based Computing Could Replace Silicon

May 17, 2011 Comments off

popsci

DNA ynse via Flickr

“DNA is the future of computing,” Jian-Jun Shu tells PhysOrg. And why not? Silicon is slow by comparison, computes in a binary system, creates waste heat, and is not particularly easy on the environment. DNA-based computing can perform better than silicon in several respects, Shu says, and he and a few of his students at Nanyang Technical University in Singapore have set out to prove it.

The general idea: the human body performs computations all of the time, and does so far faster than even the fastest silicon-based supercomputer. Moreover, it does so in a parallel fashion, working with more breadth, speed, and agility than the ones and zeros of silicon computation. For massive parallel problems, artificial intelligence problems, and combinatorial problems, DNA-based computing could be far more efficient.

How does it work? Shu and company are just starting to scratch the surface of what DNA computing could do, he admits, but in the lab he and his students have manipulated strands of DNA to do all kinds of things. They have fused strands together, broken them apart, snipped them, and Read more…

Scientists Work on New Nerve Agent Treatment

April 8, 2011 Comments off

gsn.nti.org

Researchers in Ohio are developing a new treatment that would counteract the effects of exposure to deadly organophosphorus nerve agents, according to a Tuesday release from Ohio State University (see GSN, July 25, 2007).

Nerve agents can cause uncontrollable muscle spasms and other physical effects that can prove lethal in a matter of minutes.

Existing treatments counteract the material by inserting oxime compounds that adhere to the nerve agent’s phosphorous atoms and block their effects on a key enzyme from which constant activation messages would otherwise produce the spasms through transmission to muscles, organs and glands in the body. Complete recovery from exposure, though, is not always guaranteed as some nerve agent molecules can be remain attached to enzymes.

Ohio State chemistry professor Christopher Hadad and a team of scientists are using the Ohio Supercomputer Center in studying potential compounds that would allow the body to Read more…

Blood Simple Circuitry For Cyborgs; Simplifying Cyborg Circuitry Using Human Blood

March 31, 2011 Comments off

nanopatentsandinnovations

Could electronic components made from human blood be the key to creating cyborg interfaces? Circuitry that links human tissues and nerve cells directly to an electronic device, such as a robotic limb or artificial eye might one day be possible thanks to the development of biological components.

A scanning electron microscope(SEM) image of a normal red blood cell, a platelet, and a white blood cell.

 

Credit: Wikipedia
Writing in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics, a team in India describes how a “memristor” can be made using human blood. Memristors were a theoretical electronic component first suggested in 1971 by Berkeley electrical engineer Leon Chua and finally developed in the laboratory by scientists at Hewlett Packard using titanium dioxide in 2008. A memristor is a passive device, like a resistor, with two terminals but rather than having a fixed electrical resistance, its ability to carry a current changes depending on the voltage applied previously; it retains a memory of the current, in other words.
There are countless patents linking the development of memristors to applications in programmable logic circuits, as components of future transistors, in signal processing and in neural networks. S.P. Kosta of the Education Campus Changa in Gujarat and colleagues have now explored the possibility of creating a liquid memristor from human blood. In parallel work they are investigating diodes and capacitors composed of liquid human tissues.
They constructed the laboratory-based biological memristor using a 10 ml test tube filled with human blood held at 37 Celsius into which two electrodes are inserted; appropriate measuring instrumentation was attached. The experimental memristor shows that resistance varies with applied voltage polarity and magnitude and this memory effect is sustained for at least five minutes in the device.

Having demonstrated memristor behavior in blood, the next step was to test that the same behavior would be observed in a device through which blood is flowing. This step was also successful. The next stage will be to develop a micro-channel version of the flow memristor device and to integrate several to carry out particular logic functions. This research is still a long way from an electronic to biological interface, but bodes well for the development of such devices in the future.