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Scientists grow kidneys of aborted babies in animals

March 11, 2015 Comments off

wnd.com

kidney-transplantScience publications are hailing research breakthroughs in a new life-saving procedure that harvests the organs of aborted children and transplants them in animals, where they can grow and then be made available to patients.

The Genetic Literacy Project website calls the process Xenotransplantation and suggests the biggest question would be, “Would you accept an organ from a pig, cow, baboon or a chimpanzee to save your child’s life, or your own?”

The statistics it publishes make a case for the need: More than 123,000 Americans require an organ transplant, but fewer than 30,000 will get one, leaving 21 people to die each day “waiting.”

A biotech company in Redwood City, California, called Ganogen Inc. is researching the procedure.

“Our long-term goal is to grow human organs in animals, to end the human donor shortage,” said Ganogen founder Eugene Gu.

But even the science publications are noting the ethical problem. For each organ obtained to transplant into a rat or a pig to later help a needy adult, an unborn baby must be killed.

Read more…

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Human head transplant project proposed for 2017 and further mice and monkey work in next few months

March 5, 2015 Comments off
 nextbigfuture.com
Italian surgeon Sergio Canavero announce a project perform a human head transplant at a keynote lecture at the American Academy of Neurological and Orthopaedic Surgeons annual conference this June. He sees the procedure as being possible as soon as 2017 and believes it should be pursued as a means of saving people with, say, multi-organ cancer.

He believes the patient would be able to speak in his own voice upon waking and that walking could be achieved within a year. “If society doesn’t want it, I won’t do it,” Canavero says. “But if people don’t want it in the US or Europe, that doesn’t mean it won’t be done somewhere else. Read more…

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New Microchip Can Mimic How a Human Brain Thinks

December 19, 2013 Comments off

mind-computer.com

brain controlResearchers from the University of Zurich, have created neuromorphic chips that can mimic the way a human brain will process information in real-time.

With the assistance of an artificial sensory processing system, these chips are able to display cognitive abilities.

Giacomo Indiveri, professor at the Institute of Neuroinformatics (INI), of the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, explained that the goal of the team was to “emulate the properties of biological neurons and synapses directly on microchips.”

With the creation of artificial neuromorphic neurons that can perform specified tasks, the researchers are able to further advancement toward a complex sensorimotor that can complete tasks in real-time.

Shockingly, behavior can be replicated by input formulated in a finite-state machine that could be transferred into neuromorphic hardware.

Indiveri stated: “The network connectivity patterns closely resemble structures that are also found in mammalian brains.”

Researchers at the University of Berkley have suggested implanting mind-reading “neural dust” into human brains to facilitate connectivity of man to machine.

If this dust were sprinkled onto a human brain, it could form an “implantable neural interface system that remains viable for a lifetime.”

This dust would consist of particles no more than 100 micrometers across that would Full Article Here

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Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface

March 6, 2013 Comments off

extremetech.com

Wireless BCI inventors, Arto Nurmikko and Ming Yin, look thoroughly amazed by their deviceResearchers at Brown University have succeeded in creating the first wireless, implantable, rechargeable, long-term brain-computer interface. The wireless BCIs have been implanted in pigs and monkeys for over 13 months without issue, and human subjects are next.

We’ve covered BCIs extensively here on ExtremeTech, but historically they’ve been bulky and tethered to a computer. A tether limits the mobility of the patient, and also the real-world testing that can be performed by the researchers. Brown’s wireless BCI allows the subject to move freely, dramatically increasing the quantity and quality of data that can be gathered — instead of watching what happens when a monkey moves its arm, scientists can now analyze its brain activity during complex activity, such as foraging or social interaction. Obviously, once the wireless implant is approved for human Read more…

Remote-Control Cyborg Cockroaches

September 8, 2012 Comments off

A Madagascar hissing cockroach sports a wireless electronic microcontroller that allows it to be steered by joystick.

North Carolina State University

Building robots is hard. Making them tiny, maneuverable, durable, and smart enough to find their way around in an unmapped environment—for instance, to find survivors trapped in a building after an earthquake—is harder still. So a team of scientists at North Carolina State has turned to the obvious alternative: remote-controlled bionic cockroaches.

By outfitting Madagascar hissing cockroaches with wireless electronic backpacks and hooking electrodes to their antennae and cerci, the researchers found they could Read more…

Scientists working on $330,000 test-tube-meat burger

February 21, 2012 Comments off

latimes.com

Test-tube meat

A strip of muscle tissue produced in a test tube in a Maastricht University lab. (Maastricht University)

Would you eat mystery meat grown in a lab if doing so was better for the environment? The debate may seem abstract, but scientists could turn a test-tube burger into reality by October.

The $330,000 project being conducted by Mark Post, chairman of physiology at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, involves a cow’s stem cells and funds from an anonymous private investor.

Post has already created several small strips of muscle tissue that, once he makes thousands more, will be mashed together to create a burger patty. The first sandwich could be ready this fall, he said during a presentation at the annual meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science in Vancouver, Canada.

Though companies such as Tyson Foods and JBS have asked about possible meat substitutes, much of the

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Cyborg technology with implanted human brain predicted this year

February 13, 2012 1 comment

huliq.com

By Dave Masko

Cyborg technology with implanted human brain predicted this year

It seems the future is almost here now, with Project Cyborg set to unveil an advanced specimen cyborg robot operated by an implanted human brain grown from neurons.

Famed British scientist Kevin Warwick thinks “being linked to another person’s nervous system opens up a whole world of possibilities.” For instance, he points to “thought communication instead of cell phones.” In turn, Warwick stated in in the January edition of “W” (a monthly fashion magazine at wmagazine.com) that he’s about to unveil this “cyborg” technology soon with his “most advanced specimen to date: a cyborg robot that will be operated by an implanted human brain grown from neurons.” A “cyborg” is the nickname for a “cybernetic organism” – that’s both biological and artificial, with electronic and mechanical robotic parts. Warwick, who began “Project Cyborg” in 2002 with a goal, he told W, of making discoveries that can combat Parkinson’s disease, blindness, arthritis, and schizophrenia.” Also, Professor Warwick explains how using “electronic — as opposed to chemical — medicine may well become the norm.” For instance, “W” explains how “taking Advil for a headache numbs the whole body, whereas electronic remedies could treat only the specific area.”

Professor to become a cyborg in 2012

At the same time, Professor Warwick told Read more…