Archive

Archive for the ‘volcano’ Category

Yikes. Supervolcano found under Hong Kong

August 31, 2012 Comments off

theregister

Hong Kong geologists have revealed for the first time the full extent of an ancient supervolcano with a diameter of 18km sitting beneath the former British colony.

The giant ash monster is thought to be of the same collapse caldera type as the infamous Krakatau volcano which killed tens of thousands and literally rocked the world when it blasted open near the Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra in 1883.

The discovery – one of only around 50 such volcanoes in the world – is a coup for the local rock boffins, who have been digging around the Geopark in Sai Kun in the east of the Special Administrative Region for several years.

A supervolcano is one which is capable of producing 1,000 cubic kilometers of ash in an eruption. To put that in perspective, the hugely destructive Krakatau, whose explosion was Read more…

Popocatepetl Volcano Raising Concerns in Mexico

April 17, 2012 Comments off

accuweather.com

A plume of steam rises from the Popocatepetl volcano seen from the city of Puebla, Mexico, Saturday April 14, 2012. An early-morning exhalation from the volcano sent ashes to towns near the area as moderate activity at the volcano continues. (AP Photo/Joel Merino)

A volcano within view of Mexico City has begun to erupt.

Steam, smoke and hot fragments of rock began to be ejected from Popocatepetl this past weekend.

The Volcano is located about 50 miles southeast of Mexico’s capital, Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is home to approximately 21 million people.

According to Reuters, Mexico’s National Center for Disaster Prevention this week raised the alert level to three on a scale from one to seven, with seven being the greatest threat.

The volcano has had a long history of frequent minor to moderate eruptions.

In 2000, thousands of residents surrounding the nearly 18,000-foot mountain were forced to evacuate. Popocatepetl is North America’s second highest volcano.

Eruptions have occurred in November and June of 2011.

According to VolcanoDiscovery.com, Popocatepetl was dormant during the 1950s, 60s, 70s and 80s.

Mexico authorities were recommending limiting Read more…

Deep Ocean Mysteries and Wonders

April 10, 2012 Comments off
Categories: volcano Tags: ,

Ice Age, Supervolcano Could Topple US Government

March 16, 2012 Comments off

beforeitsnews

As more evidence mounts that the world is slipping faster into the next Ice Age, Washington insiders are scurrying to solidify their new power base for centralized government operations. Fears that the US capital might be struck by another more deadly terrorist attack—or other disasters—prompted federal agencies more than a decade ago to hurriedly establish back-up operations in case catastrophe struck. Despite the fact that many conspiracy theories are weaved around the subjects that follow—including some fairly wild-eyed, tin foil hat scenarios—most conspiracy theories have a basis in fact, albeit the facts are often distorted or wildly exaggerated. The actual story of the bizarre Denver International airport, the nation’s “second capital,” the impending Ice Age possibility, and the Yellowstone supervolcano threat to America follows…

Read more…

El Hierro Submarine Volcano Eruption

February 16, 2012 Comments off

Irish_Weather_Online

Posted Image

Four months after it began, the underwater volcanic eruption off El Hierro Island (Canaries) persists. This natural-color satellite image, collected on February 10, 2012, shows the site of the eruption, near the fishing village of La Restinga.

Bright aquamarine water indicates high concentrations of volcanic material. Immediately above the vent, a patch of brown water resembles a turbulent hot tub and indicates when and where the eruption is strongest. Video of the eruption shows the activity in more detail.

This image was acquired by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. The eruption is just off the southern coast of El Hierro, the youngest of the Canary Islands. El Hierro is about 460 kilometers (290 miles) west of Morocco and Western Sahara.

According to El Hierro Digital, measurements of the sea floor by the Instituto Oceanográfico Español found that the volcano’s summit is now only 120 meters (390 feet) beneath the ocean surface—10 meters (30 feet) higher than it was in mid-January. The height of the erupting cone is about 210 meters (690 feet) above the former ocean bottom, with a total volume over 145 million cubic meters (512 million cubic feet) of new material.

NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data. Caption by Robert Simmon. Instrument: EO-1 – ALI

Waiting For Death Valley’s Big Bang: A Volcanic Explosion Crater May Have Future Potential

January 23, 2012 1 comment

nanopatentsandinnovations.blogspot.com

In California’s Death Valley, death is looking just a bit closer. Geologists have determined that the half-mile-wide Ubehebe Crater, formed by a prehistoric volcanic explosion, was created far more recently than previously thought—and conditions for a sequel may exist today.
Scientists dated the crater using rock fragments thrown out when it exploded. Lead author Peri Sasnett contemplates a sample.
Credit: Brent Goehring/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Up to now, geologists were vague on the age of the 600-foot-deep crater, which formed when a rising plume of magma hit a pocket of underground water, creating an explosion. The most common estimate was about 6,000 years before present, based partly on Native American artifacts found under debris. Now, a team based at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has used isotopes in rocks blown out of the crater to show that it formed just 800 years ago, around the year 1300. That geologic youth means it probably still has Read more…

Tremors Around Iceland’s Katla Volcano (A Bigger Eyjafjallajökull) Reported

January 6, 2012 1 comment

inewp.com

Remember Eyjafjallajökull? The Icelandic volcano that was hilariously mispronounced by every non-Icelandic news reporter but wreaked grim havoc with airlines and airports?

Well, Katla, the more bigger (its magma chamber is easily ten times bigger than the one in Eyjafjallajökull) and easily pronounceable volcano supposedly named after an evil, mythological troll, could produce such disruptive havoc on a bigger scale..funnily enough, in a similar manner to an Internet troll.

When Eyjafjallajökull erupted in 2010, many were worried that Read more…