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Posts Tagged ‘atmosphere’

New NASA Data Blow Gaping Hole In Global Warming Alarmism

July 29, 2011 2 comments

forbes

By JAMES TAYLOR
This NASA handout Terra satellite image obtain...Image by AFP/Getty Images via @daylife

NASA satellite data from the years 2000 through 2011 show the Earth’s atmosphere is allowing far more heat to be released into space than alarmist computer models have predicted, reports a new study in the peer-reviewed science journal Remote Sensing. The study indicates far less future global warming will occur than United Nations computer models have predicted, and supports prior studies indicating increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide trap far less heat than alarmists have claimed.

Study co-author Dr. Roy Spencer, a principal research scientist at the University of Alabama in Huntsville and U.S. Science Team Leader for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer flying on NASA’s Aqua satellite, reports that real-world data from NASA’s Terra satellite contradict Read more…

Earth’s Tallest Lightning Seen in Unprecedented Detail

July 27, 2011 Comments off

ouramazingplanet

jet lightningTrees form a horizon from which a gigantic jet emerges; the thunderstorm is 200 miles away. Credit: Steven Cummer

Mysterious and gigantic jets of lightning that shoot up to near the edge of space have now been observed in unprecedented detail, revealing just how much charge they pack and how they form.

More than 50 miles (80 kilometers) above Earth’s surface, extreme ultraviolet radiation from the sun reacts with air molecules to produce highly charged particles, generating an energetic region known as the ionosphere.

In 2001, scientists discovered gigantic jets of lightning arcing up from clouds in the lowest portion of the atmosphere, the troposphere, to the ionosphere. These rarities apparently are caused by Read more…

Scientists Aglow After Big Discovery During Tsunami

July 17, 2011 Comments off

sott

Researchers using a camera on Maui have photographed the glow from atmospheric pressure disturbances generated by the March 11 tsunami, raising hopes that the technique could be used to predict the arrival of future waves.

The first observation of its kind was made from the Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing Station atop Haleakala by scientists in France, Brazil and the United States.

The March 11 earthquake in Japan generated a seismic sea wave that devastated parts of northern Honshu and caused millions of dollars of damage in Hawaii.

On the open ocean, such waves move at 500 mph but are only an inch high. Nevertheless, they put pressure on the atmosphere, scientists say.

“The atmosphere gets less and less dense as you get higher, and that allows the Read more…

Rising Oceans – Too Late to Turn the Tide?

July 15, 2011 1 comment

uanews.org

(Click to enlarge) If sea levels rose to where they were during the Last Interglacial Period, large parts of the Gulf of Mexico would be under water (red areas), including half of Florida and several Caribbean islands. (Photo illustration by Jeremy Weiss)

By Daniel Stolte, University Communications July 14, 2011
Melting ice sheets contributed much more to rising sea levels than thermal expansion of warming ocean waters during the Last Interglacial Period, a UA-led team of researchers has found. The results further suggest that ocean levels continue to rise long after warming of the atmosphere has leveled off.

Thermal expansion of seawater contributed only slightly to rising sea levels compared to melting ice sheets during the Last Interglacial Period, a University of Arizona-led team of researchers has found.

The study combined paleoclimate records with computer simulations of Read more…

Military Hush-Up: Incoming Objects Now Classified .. Closing the Eyes of a Nation

July 14, 2011 Comments off

beforeitsnews

Considering such a sudden change in procedures … and the blocking of mainstream sky viewing in this manner … should be receives as sort of a red flag …With all the increase of notice celestial activity … I would consider that there is either something this way comes … or something that way goes …Either way I consider that there is something,  somebody,  don’t what us to see …https://i2.wp.com/asteroidapophis.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/s-METEOR-large.jpg

The upshot: Space rocks that explode in the atmosphere are now classified.

“It’s baffling to us why this would suddenly change,” said one scientist familiar with the work. “It’s unfortunate because there was this great synergy…a very good cooperative arrangement. Systems were put into Read more…

Study: Volcanoes can trigger bigger climate impact

July 12, 2011 Comments off

thehindu

The atmospheric data collected during the Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption suggests that volcanic eruptions can release up to 100 million times more ash particles than thought.
AP The atmospheric data collected during the Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption suggests that volcanic eruptions can release up to 100 million times more ash particles than thought.

Volcanic eruptions might affect earth’s climate by releasing far more weather-altering particles than scientists have suspected previously, a new study has found.

A team of researchers, who wanted to find out the influence of volcanoes on global climate, investigated the huge eruption of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland on March 20, 2010.

From a research station in France, they monitored the volcano’s eruption, which rapidly ejected large ash particles into the atmosphere and spread all over Europe. They then analysed how many secondary particles this ash generated upon reacting chemically with Read more…

World’s Oceans In ‘Shocking’ Decline

June 21, 2011 Comments off

bbc

Coral and fishThe oceans are in a worse state than previously suspected, according to an expert panel of scientists.

In a new report, they warn that ocean life is “at high risk of entering a phase of extinction of marine species unprecedented in human history”.

They conclude that issues such as over-fishing, pollution and climate change are acting together in ways that have not previously been recognised.

The impacts, they say, are already affecting humanity.

The panel was convened by the International Programme on the State of the Ocean (IPSO), and brought together experts from different disciplines, including coral reef ecologists, toxicologists, and fisheries scientists.

Its report will be formally released later this week.

“The findings are shocking,” said Alex Rogers, IPSO’s scientific director and professor of conservation biology at Oxford University.

“As we considered the cumulative effect of what humankind does to the oceans, the implications became far worse than we had individually realised.

“We’ve sat in one forum and spoken to Read more…

Giant “Surfing” Waves Roll Through Sun’s Atmosphere

June 10, 2011 Comments off

universetoday

Surfer waves — initiated in the sun, as they are in the water, by a process called a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability — have been found in the sun’s atmosphere. Credit: NASA/SDO/Astrophysical Journal Letters

Surf’s up on the Sun! Our favorite gnarly spacecraft, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has caught conclusive evidence of classic “surfer waves” in the Sun’s atmosphere. But these waves trump ‘Hawaii Five-O’ surfing big time. These solar waves are about the same size as the continental U.S, and spotting these waves will help our understanding of how energy moves through the solar atmosphere, known as the corona.

Just like a surfing wave on Earth, the solar counterpart is formed by Read more…

Flights out of Scotland cancelled as ash cloud from Iceland volcano ‘will drift over UK within hours’

May 23, 2011 Comments off

dailymail

A Scottish airline has cancelled 36 flights tomorrow as the ash cloud billowing from a volanco in Iceland approaches UK airspace.

Regional carrier Loganair, which flies out of Glasgow, announced that there would be no flights following a Civil Aviation Authority warning that disruption could not be ruled out.

The Met Office is predicting the plume of ash from the Grimsvotn volcano will begin to drift over parts of Scotland in the next few hours and would cover all of Ireland, Scotland and parts of northern Britain by 6am tomorrow.

Asked whether this would cause some disruption to flights, a CAA spokesman said: ‘That’s the way it’s looking certainly at the moment.’

William Hague, however, has said he does not predict the volcano will not cause the chaos seen a year ago. The Foreign Secretary has said that Britain has more information on how ash clouds move and is less likely to have to enforce a blanket flight ban.

Last April airports across the UK were shut down for five days. With school half-term holidays next week any disruption to UK airports would cause chaos for hundreds of thousands of families.

Monster Storm Rearranges Saturn Before Our Eyes

May 20, 2011 1 comment

space 

The best views yet of a giant, once-in-a-generation storm on Saturn are now emerging, revealing how such tempests disrupt the ringed planet and create hot spots and cold vortexes, researchers say.

These findings could shed new light on the behavior of giant planets orbiting both alien stars and our sun. [Photo of Saturn’s huge storm]

The atmosphere of Saturn normally appears calm, but about once per Saturn year — equal to about 30 Earth years — the giant world is gripped by a titanic storm as spring comes to its northern hemisphere. The current monster Saturn storm erupted last Dec. 5.

“This disturbance in the northern hemisphere of Saturn has created a gigantic, violent and complex Read more…

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