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Posts Tagged ‘Climate’

Study: Volcanoes can trigger bigger climate impact

July 12, 2011 Comments off

thehindu

The atmospheric data collected during the Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption suggests that volcanic eruptions can release up to 100 million times more ash particles than thought.
AP The atmospheric data collected during the Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption suggests that volcanic eruptions can release up to 100 million times more ash particles than thought.

Volcanic eruptions might affect earth’s climate by releasing far more weather-altering particles than scientists have suspected previously, a new study has found.

A team of researchers, who wanted to find out the influence of volcanoes on global climate, investigated the huge eruption of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland on March 20, 2010.

From a research station in France, they monitored the volcano’s eruption, which rapidly ejected large ash particles into the atmosphere and spread all over Europe. They then analysed how many secondary particles this ash generated upon reacting chemically with Read more…

Climate Record Suggesting Severe Tropical Droughts as Northern Temperatures Rise

May 13, 2011 Comments off

terradaily


Laguna Pumacocha in the Peruvian Andes.

A 2,300-year climate record Universityof Pittsburgh researchers recovered from an Andes Mountains lake reveals that as temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere rise, the planet’s densely populated tropical regions will most likely experience severe water shortages as the crucial summer monsoons become drier. The Pitt team found that equatorial regions of South America already are receiving less rainfall than at any point in the past millennium.

The researchers report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that a nearly 6-foot-long sediment core from Laguna Pumacocha in Peru contains the most detailed geochemical record of tropical climate fluctuations yet uncovered. The core shows pronounced dry and wet phases of the South American summer monsoons and corresponds with existing geological data of precipitation changes in the surrounding regions.

Paired with these sources, the sediment record illustrated that rainfall during the South American summer monsoon has dropped sharply since 1900-exhibiting the greatest shift in precipitation since around Read more…

Texas Wildfires Threaten Wheat Crop, Drive Food Prices Higher

April 22, 2011 Comments off

care2.com

Texas Wildfires Threaten Wheat Crop, Drive Food Prices Higher
This month, raging wildfires in Texas have killed two firefighters, burned over a million acres of land and threatened thousands of homes. Three years of record droughts throughout the state have left fields full of dry and dead vegetation, making fighting the spread of wildfire flames extremely difficult.

As firefighters from around the country and the National Guard continue to battle the many blazes scattered across the state, with no immediate end to the crisis in sight, the future looks bleak for Texas farmers. Many farmers’ fields were already damaged by drought, and now some crops have been further harmed by smoke or entirely destroyed by flame.

Some agricultural experts are now predicting that Texas will lose two thirds of this year’s wheat crop to drought and Read more…

Fossil Sirenians Give Scientists New Look at Ancient Climate

April 22, 2011 Comments off

nsf.gov

Photo of geologist Mark Clementz sampling tooth enamel from molars in a Florida manatee.Geologist Mark Clementz samples tooth enamel from molars in the lower jaw of a Florida manatee.

April 21, 2011

What tales they tell of their former lives, these old bones of sirenians, relatives of today’s dugongs and manatees.

And now, geologists have found, they tell of the waters in which they swam.

While researching the evolutionary ecology of ancient sirenians–commonly known as sea cows–scientist Mark Clementz and colleagues unexpectedly stumbled across data that could change the view of climate during the Eocene Read more…

NASA admits all previous warming trends caused by sun

April 4, 2011 Comments off

helium.com

I wonder what Al Gore’s rebuttal is going to sound like…

Under mounting pressure from scientists that reject the politically popularized man-made global warming and climate models—the Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) theory—the American space agency NASA has admitted that all past warming trends were driven by solar activity.

A victory for the man-made ‘global warming deniers’

As more scientists have joined the outcry over the politicization of Earth’s climate cycles—the current number exceeds 20,000—promoters of the AGW model have denounced the “global warming deniers” countering that little evidence supports the view that the sun is driving the observed warming trend.

Now, however, new study released from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland measuring the global temperature variance during the past 100 years has found the sun’s heat and variable cycles have indeed made a significant, measurable impact and greatly influenced Earth’s climate.

In fact, the influence extends as far back as the Read more…

Global warming means more snowstorms: scientists

March 2, 2011 Comments off

physorg.com

Climate change is not only making the planet warmer, it is also making snowstorms stronger and more frequent, US scientists said on Tuesday.


Workers remove snow from a runway at O'Hare International Airport on February 3Workers remove snow from a runway at O’Hare International Airport on February 3, in Chicago, Illinois. Climate change is not only making the planet warmer, it is also making snowstorms stronger and more frequent, US scientists said on Tuesday. 

 


“Heavy snowstorms are not inconsistent with a warming planet,” said scientist Jeff Masters, as part of a conference call with reporters and colleagues convened by the Union of Concern Scientists.

“In fact, as the Earth gets warmer and more moisture gets absorbed into the atmosphere, we are steadily loading the dice in favor of more extreme storms in all seasons, capable of causing greater impacts on society.”

Masters said that the northeastern United States has been coated in heavy snowfall from Read more…

Limited Nuclear War Could Deplete Ozone Layer, Increasing Radiation

February 25, 2011 1 comment

By Chris Schneidmiller

Global Security Newswire

WASHINGTON — A nuclear conflict involving as few as 100 weapons could produce long-term damage to the ozone layer, enabling higher than “extreme” levels of ultraviolet radiation to reach the Earth’s surface, new research indicates (see GSN, March 16, 2010).

(Feb. 24) – A 1971 French nuclear test at Mururoa Atoll. The ozone layer could sustain lasting harm from a nuclear exchange involving as few as 100 weapons, allowing increased levels of ultraviolet radiation to reach the Earth’s surface, according to new research (Getty Images).

Increased levels of UV radiation from the sun could persist for years, possibly with a drastic impact on humans and the environment, even thousands of miles from the area of the nuclear conflict.

“A regional nuclear exchange of 100 15-kiloton weapons … would produce unprecedented low-ozone columns over populated areas in conjunction with the coldest surface temperatures experienced in the last 1,000 years, and would likely result in a global nuclear famine,” according to a presentation delivered on Friday at a major science conference in Washington.

Today, there are five recognized nuclear powers — China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States. India, Israel and Pakistan are all known or widely assumed to hold nuclear weapons, while North Korea has a Read more…