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Posts Tagged ‘Biometrics’

10 Ways That The Iron Grip Of The Big Brother Prison Grid Is Tightening On All Of Our Lives

August 5, 2013 Comments off

endoftheamericandream.com

Trapped - Spider And WebDo you ever feel trapped in an invisible control grid that is slowly but surely closing in all around you?  Do you ever feel like virtually everything that you do is being watched, tracked, monitored and recorded?  If so, unfortunately it is not just your imagination.  Our society is rapidly being transformed into a Big Brother prison grid by a government that is seemingly obsessed with knowing everything that we do.  They want a record of all of our phone calls, all of our Internet activity and all of our financial transactions.  They even want our DNA.  They put chips in our passports, they are starting to scan the eyes of our children in our schools, and they have declared our border areas to be “Constitution-free zones” where they can do just about anything to us that they want.  The Bill of Rights has already been eroded so badly that many would argue that it is already dead.  The assault against our most basic freedoms and liberties never seems to end.  The following are 10 ways that Read more…

Categories: Privacy Tags: ,

Next round of smartphones to incorporate biometrics

August 2, 2013 Comments off

biometricupdate.com

Biometrics Research Group, Inc. expects that biometrics will become integrated within a wide number of mobile devices in the near future. Integration will be driven by smartphone and tablet manufacturers such as Apple and Samsung Electronics, which we expect will add both fingerprint and gesture recognition functionality to their mobile devices within the next year.

In January, at the Consumer Electronics Show, a Samsung Android phone was demonstrated which included a fingerprint sensor underneath its screen. Developed by Validity, a firm that creates biometric authentication solutions for mobile devices, the sensor allowed a user to log into an Android-based smartphone with a single swipe of a finger. Using a fingerprint authentication system entitled “Natural Login”, Validity will not only enable security access to mobile devices, but will also allow validation of e-commerce transactions.

As extensively reported in BiometricUpdate.com, Apple is also undertaking incorporation of biometric technologies into its devices. Apple entered into an Read more…

Hunt for illegal immigrants wants your fingerprint

March 7, 2013 Comments off

masslive.com

I

A U.S. Border Patrol vehicle sits parked in front of a crowd of people peering through the U.S.-Mexico border fence at Border Field State Park in San Diego in 2009. At one time, before the enhanced border fence in the area, the San Diego area held the most popular routes for illegal immigrants heading into the United States. (Photo by Denis Poroy / Associated Press file)

Because others have broken the law, the federal government may soon make you prove that you are not a criminal.

Call it logic, Washington-style.

Legislators in the Senate, working to get a handle on illegal immigration, have been talking about requiring each and every person in the land to have an identification card, implanted with a fingerprint or some other biometric detail, in order to get a job. In other words, we would all be guilty until we could prove our innocence, would all be illegals until we could prove our citizenship.

The problem: undocumented workers. Washington’s solution: give the citizens documents.

This plan, being developed by senators working on an immigration fix, badly misreads the mood of the citizenry. The people – liberals and conservatives alike – do not trust the government to do the right thing. Don’t the nation’s elected officials read the polls? Do they really believe that Read more…

Employers Turn to Biometric Technology to Track Attendance

March 6, 2013 Comments off

workforce.com

When hourly employees arrive at Greathouse Screen Printing in San Diego, instead of punching a time clock they smile into a biometric facial recognition device that sits on a counter at the front of the shop. In a matter of seconds, the device identifies them, automatically punches them in, and sends the data to a cloud-based time-and-attendance software program.

The company’s owner, Shawn Greathouse, implemented the biometric clock from Processing Point Inc. a year ago to streamline his time-management process and to ensure that he was only paying employees for the hours they worked.

“Buddy punching was definitely part of the decision,” Greathouse says. “It was never an out-of-hand problem, but it did happen.”

Buddy punching—the practice of punching another employee in or out when they aren’t there—is one of many forms of time theft.

A 2009 study conducted by Harris Interactive Inc. showed that 21 percent of hourly employees admit to stealing company time. While only 5 percent participated in buddy punching, 69 percent said they punch in and Read more…

Categories: Biometrics Tags: ,

Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface

March 6, 2013 Comments off

extremetech.com

Wireless BCI inventors, Arto Nurmikko and Ming Yin, look thoroughly amazed by their deviceResearchers at Brown University have succeeded in creating the first wireless, implantable, rechargeable, long-term brain-computer interface. The wireless BCIs have been implanted in pigs and monkeys for over 13 months without issue, and human subjects are next.

We’ve covered BCIs extensively here on ExtremeTech, but historically they’ve been bulky and tethered to a computer. A tether limits the mobility of the patient, and also the real-world testing that can be performed by the researchers. Brown’s wireless BCI allows the subject to move freely, dramatically increasing the quantity and quality of data that can be gathered — instead of watching what happens when a monkey moves its arm, scientists can now analyze its brain activity during complex activity, such as foraging or social interaction. Obviously, once the wireless implant is approved for human Read more…

Pentagon Inks Deal for Smartphone Tool That Scans Your Face, Eyes, Thumbs

February 13, 2013 Comments off

wired.com

California-based AOptix landed a deal with the Defense Department for its biometrics identification system that loads onto a smartphone (shown here as a hardware mock-up). Photo: AOptix

In a few years, the soldier, marine or special operator out on patrol might be able to record the facial features or iris signature of a suspicious person all from his or her smartphone — and at a distance, too.

The Defense Department has awarded a $3 million research contract to California-based AOptix to examine its “Smart Mobile Identity” biometrics identification package, Danger Room has learned. At the end of two years of research to validate the concepts of what the company built, AOptix will provide the Defense Department with a hardware peripheral and software suite that turns a commercially available smartphone into a device that Read more…

Facing up to the law: increasing surveillance raises privacy concerns

February 12, 2013 Comments off

smh.com

I spy the use of facial recognition systems by law enforcement agencies is becoming more widespread. Illustration: Sam Bennett

ABOUT 15,000 people have had images of their faces captured on an Australian Federal Police database in its first year of operation, igniting fears that the rise of facial recognition systems will lead to CCTV cameras being installed on every street corner.

The database includes pictures of alleged criminals who may not know their images are on file.

The AFP say facial recognition may eventually be considered as credible as fingerprints, but images on their database are not being shared with state police forces. Sharing images on a national database could be possible by 2015.

The president of Australian Councils for Civil Liberties, Terry O’Gorman, said it was troubling that technologies such as facial and number plate recognition had become so widespread and there appeared to be no independent monitoring of the impacts on privacy.

The justification for widespread CCTV has also been questioned, with a report by police in London, the most spied-upon city in the world, showing that only one crime was solved per 1000 cameras.

An AFP forensic and data centres biometrics co-ordinator, Simon Walsh, said international agencies were Read more…

Gold Sellers in Houston Must Submit to Fingerprints and Mugshots

February 12, 2013 Comments off

infowars.com

Instead of reducing crime, the new law will instead put a damper on the sale of gold, silver and other precious metals

Last week the Houston City Council passed an ordinance requiring people who sell precious metals to be fingerprinted and photographed.

According to KTRK-TV, the ordinance is “meant to help track down criminals who try to resell stolen valuables. Gold-buying businesses will now be required to photograph and fingerprint sellers as well as photograph the items that are being sold to the dealer.” In other words, citizens who sell gold will be considered criminals until they demonstrate otherwise.

“It’s going to allow us the tools necessary to combat a lot of the high-end jewelry thefts that’s going on in the city, whether it’s robberies or burglaries,” Houston Police Officer Rick Barajas told the news station last Wednesday.

Audi S8s, Shelby Mustangs, BMW M5s, Dodge Chargers and Honda S2000 roadsters are stolen thousands of times a year and yet people who own them are not required by government to be fingerprinted and photographed in Read more…

11 Body Parts Defense Researchers Will Use to Track You

January 29, 2013 Comments off

wired.com

The Ear

Cell phones that can identify you by how you walk. Fingerprint scanners that work from 25 feet away. Radars that pick up your heartbeat from behind concrete walls. Algorithms that can tell identical twins apart. Eyebrows and earlobes that give you away. A new generation of technologies is emerging that can identify you by your physiology. And unlike the old crop of biometric systems, you don’t need to be right up close to the scanner in order to be identified. If they work as advertised, they may be able to identify you without you ever knowing you’ve been spotted.

Biometrics had a boom after 9/11. Gobs of government money poured into face and iris recognition systems; the Pentagon alone spent nearly $3 billion in five years, and the Defense Department was only one of many federal agencies funneling cash in the technologies. Civil libertarians feared the Read more…

Pilot program explores a ‘cashless society’

January 24, 2013 Comments off

rapidcityjournal.com

This is not good news as there are a lot more cons than pros in this debate

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Aaron Rosenblatt, Rapid City Journal

Bernie Keeler, a mechanical engineering student at South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, demonstrates how to buy an item using biometric payment Tuesday at the Miner’s Shack snack bar. Nexus USA is piloting the Smart Pay system on the Mines campus.

School of Mines students and all of Rapid City could soon be at the cutting edge of a technology that developers say will eliminate the need for cash, IDs and maybe even car keys.

“We’re hoping that this is the future,” Al Maas, president of Nexus USA, said Tuesday at a news conference at Mines. “The applications for this are beyond your imagination.”

On Tuesday, mechanical engineering student Bernie Keeler showed just how easily the system works. After grabbing a Gatorade and a sandwich at the Miner’s Shack, he paid by swiping his index finger through Read more…