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Posts Tagged ‘technology’

U.S. government spending on big data to grow exponentially

August 10, 2013 Comments off

biometricupdate.com

 

 

August 9, 2013 –

 

Biometrics Research Group, Inc. has observed that national security and military applications are driving a large proportion of “Big Data” research spending.

 

Big Data is a term used to describe large and complex data sets that can provide insightful conclusions when analyzed and visualized in a meaningful way. Conventional database tools do not have capabilities to manage large volumes of unstructured data.  The U.S. Government is therefore investing in programs to develop new tools and technologies to manage highly complex data.  The basic components of Big Data include hardware, software, services and storage.

 

Biometrics Research Group estimates that federal agencies spent approximately US$5 billion on Big Data resources in the 2012 fiscal year. We estimate that annual spending will grow to Read more…

1974 PSA Warned Of High Tech Surveillance State For Behavior Control

August 9, 2013 Comments off

whiteowlconspiracy.com

tvhead-620x400By Aaron Dykes and Melissa Melton
Truthstream Media

 

“A tormenting thought: as of a certain point, history was no longer real. Without noticing it, all mankind suddenly left reality.” -Elias Canetti, Nobel Laureate in literature

As more and more information is released via National Security Administration whistleblower Edward Snowden, many Americans drifting through each day blissfully unaware of what country they really live in have had the curtain pulled back just enough to be fed their first spoonful of reality…it’s a bitter taste.

The clip below is of a public service message warning the public on the growing use of technology and surveillance by government and corporations (though who can really tell the difference these days) to control our lives.

Sure, you say. We know all about that. Snowden has conclusively shown us with leaked documentation what our government is doing to us.

Ah. But the film was not made last week or even last decade; it was filmed in 1974.

Watch and listen. No, really listen. This message isn’t just to warn us about the coming technological surveillance state itself, but how its construct is to Read more…

Mind Reading Machine For Sale In Europe Now

August 6, 2013 Comments off

nanopatentsandinnovations.blogspot.com

“We have developed so called brain-computer interfaces which allow the user to control different devices and programmes without hands, by means of the user’s thoughts.”

That is how Christoph Hintermüller of the Project Management and Research team at g.tec Guger Technologies sums up a machine which can quite literally read the mind.

It is intended for disabled patients, and the system made up of electrodes which sit on the scalp translates user intentions into electronic commands.

“A brain-computer interface captures various electrical impulses from the head of the user, and decodes them into specific tasks and actions,” continued Christoph Hintermüller.

That allows the user to play an online computer game, hands-free. The user selects the commands by simply looking at the blinking arrows on the screen. The frequency of the flashing is reproduced in Read more…

Categories: Technology Tags: ,

Next round of smartphones to incorporate biometrics

August 2, 2013 Comments off

biometricupdate.com

Biometrics Research Group, Inc. expects that biometrics will become integrated within a wide number of mobile devices in the near future. Integration will be driven by smartphone and tablet manufacturers such as Apple and Samsung Electronics, which we expect will add both fingerprint and gesture recognition functionality to their mobile devices within the next year.

In January, at the Consumer Electronics Show, a Samsung Android phone was demonstrated which included a fingerprint sensor underneath its screen. Developed by Validity, a firm that creates biometric authentication solutions for mobile devices, the sensor allowed a user to log into an Android-based smartphone with a single swipe of a finger. Using a fingerprint authentication system entitled “Natural Login”, Validity will not only enable security access to mobile devices, but will also allow validation of e-commerce transactions.

As extensively reported in BiometricUpdate.com, Apple is also undertaking incorporation of biometric technologies into its devices. Apple entered into an Read more…

fMRI Machine Read Minds Knows Who You Are Thinking About

March 6, 2013 Comments off

nanopatentsandinnovations.blogspot.com

It is possible to tell who a person is thinking about by analyzing images of his or her brain. Our mental models of people produce unique patterns of brain activation, which can be detected using advanced imaging techniques according to a study by Cornell University neuroscientist Nathan Spreng and his colleagues.

“When we looked at our data, we were shocked that we could successfully decode who our participants were thinking about based on their brain activity,” said Spreng, assistant professor of human development in Cornell’s College of Human Ecology.

Researcher checking fMRI images

File:Researcher-test.jpg
Credit: Wikipedia

Understanding and predicting the behavior of others is a key to successfully navigating the social world, yet little is known about how the brain actually models the Read more…

Categories: Technology Tags: , ,

Next Up for Big Brother: Recording and Transcribing Public Conversations

March 6, 2013 1 comment

allgov.com

Matt Lease, a computer scientist at the University of Texas, is working on ways to literally record all human conversations no matter where they take place. But his research is being funded by the Department of Defense, raising the question of how such a technology might be used in the hands of the government.

 

Lease’s plan is to utilize crowdsourcing, voice recognition software and everyday devices like smartphones to gather human speech, whether in a business meeting or on the street, and store it somewhere so people could access what they said anytime.

 

He told Wired’s Danger Room that he saw the work as both a “need and opportunity to really make conversational speech more accessible, more part of our permanent record instead of being so ephemeral, and really trying to imagine what this world would look like if we really could capture all these conversations and make use of them effectively going forward.”

 

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) liked Lease’s idea so much it gave him a $300,000 grant to support his efforts.

 

If successful, this new system could raise “some thorny legal and social questions about privacy,” wrote Robert Beckhusen at Wired.

 

One example cited by Lease involves “respecting the privacy rights of multiple people involved,” and how to gain permission of everyone talking before capturing and storing a conversation. In the hands of spy agencies, this is not expected to be an issue.

-Noel Brinkerhoff

Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface

March 6, 2013 Comments off

extremetech.com

Wireless BCI inventors, Arto Nurmikko and Ming Yin, look thoroughly amazed by their deviceResearchers at Brown University have succeeded in creating the first wireless, implantable, rechargeable, long-term brain-computer interface. The wireless BCIs have been implanted in pigs and monkeys for over 13 months without issue, and human subjects are next.

We’ve covered BCIs extensively here on ExtremeTech, but historically they’ve been bulky and tethered to a computer. A tether limits the mobility of the patient, and also the real-world testing that can be performed by the researchers. Brown’s wireless BCI allows the subject to move freely, dramatically increasing the quantity and quality of data that can be gathered — instead of watching what happens when a monkey moves its arm, scientists can now analyze its brain activity during complex activity, such as foraging or social interaction. Obviously, once the wireless implant is approved for human Read more…

LAPD Uses Anti-Terrorism Devise to Track Cellphone Users

January 29, 2013 1 comment

allgov.com

The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is using an anti-terrorism device that indiscriminately sweeps up cellphone communications of innocent bystanders during burglary, drug and murder investigations.

LA Weekly wrote back in September that the police agency purchased Stingray technology in 2006 using Department of Homeland Security (DHS) funds, and is deploying the portable equipment for routine police operations. DHS grant documents said the device was intended for “regional terrorism investigations.”

Stingray pretends that it is a cell tower and fools wireless phones into establishing a connection. Once connected, it can establish cell location and download information of people who are not suspects in an investigation, raising all sorts of privacy issues.

Information obtained by the First Amendment Coalition under the California Public Records Act indicates that LAPD used Stingray 21 times in a four-month period last year. While carriers like AT&T and Sprint typically require a court order before granting law enforcement access to cellphone data, it is not clear that LAPD is asking the courts for a warrant.

Privacy advocates argue that accessing phones with Stingray constitutes a “search and seizure” under the Constitution’s Fourth Amendment, and requires a warrant. The FBI has argued it doesn’t need a warrant because cellphone users have no reasonable expectation of privacy. The U.S.Supreme Court has not yet ruled on the issue.

The records viewed by LA Weekly seemed to indicate that judges were not fully apprised of Stingray’s scope; that it was sweeping a range of cellphones rather than a specific suspect’s phone.

LAPD refuses to comment on Stingray, which is reportedly also being used by local law enforcement in Fort Worth, Texas, Gilbert, Arizona, and Miami.

–Ken Broder

11 Body Parts Defense Researchers Will Use to Track You

January 29, 2013 Comments off

wired.com

The Ear

Cell phones that can identify you by how you walk. Fingerprint scanners that work from 25 feet away. Radars that pick up your heartbeat from behind concrete walls. Algorithms that can tell identical twins apart. Eyebrows and earlobes that give you away. A new generation of technologies is emerging that can identify you by your physiology. And unlike the old crop of biometric systems, you don’t need to be right up close to the scanner in order to be identified. If they work as advertised, they may be able to identify you without you ever knowing you’ve been spotted.

Biometrics had a boom after 9/11. Gobs of government money poured into face and iris recognition systems; the Pentagon alone spent nearly $3 billion in five years, and the Defense Department was only one of many federal agencies funneling cash in the technologies. Civil libertarians feared the Read more…

This Is Not A Mosquito It’s An Insect Spy Drone For Urban Areas Already In Production Funded By The Gov (VIDEO)

January 23, 2013 Comments off

pakalertpress.com

It’s an insect spy drone for urban areas, already in production, funded by the Government. It can be remotely controlled and is equipped with a camera and a microphone. It can land on you, and it may have the potential to take a DNA sample or leave RFID tracking nanotechnology on your skin.

This Is Not A Mosquito It’s An Insect Spy Drone For Urban Areas Already In Production Funded By The Gov

It can fly through an open window, or it can attach to your clothing until you take it in your home.

And for all you who automatically say “fake” because you don’t think the government is funding this… do some research.

Source: http://is.gd/Uy5DJT
Research paper: http://is.gd/1UcubI
Footage: http://is.gd/wYN00X
Knowledge of Today

Read more…